Division of agriculture



Yüklə 69.74 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix28.01.2017
ölçüsü69.74 Kb.

DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 

R E S E A R C H   &   E X T E N S I O N  

University of Arkansas System 

Agriculture and Natural Resources 

FSA3054  

Musk Thistle  

John Jennings

Professor - Forages 

Gus Lorenz 

Associate Department

Head - Entomology 

John Boyd

Professor - Weed Science 

Don Steinkraus 

Professor - Entomology 

Tim Kring

Former Professor - 

Entomology 

Arkansas Is  

Our Campus  

Visit our web site at: 

http://www.uaex.edu 

University of Arkansas, United States Department of Agriculture, and County Governments Cooperating 



Origin and Distribution

      Musk thistle (Carduus nutans L.) 

is an aggressive weed that infests 

pasture and rangeland. It is native to 

Europe but was introduced acciden­

tally into the eastern United States 

during the mid to late 1800s. Because 

of its prolific seed production and lack 

of natural enemies, it spread rapidly 

throughout much of North America. 

It is a weed of considerable economic 

importance in forage­producing areas 

and has been declared a noxious weed 

in many states. 



Characteristics

      Musk thistle plants grow from 

two to more than six feet in height 

(Figure 1). Flower color varies from 

purple to a deep reddish­pink. Each 

flower head is located at the tip of a 

long stem or branch. The large flowers 

commonly grow to two inches in diam­

eter, causing the stems to bend or nod 

over as the flower matures. Musk 

thistle is also called nodding thistle.

      Leaves, stems and branches of 

musk thistle plants are covered with 

sharp spines. The long leaves are 

deeply and irregularly indented. They 

have a smooth, waxy surface with a 

light­colored grayish­green margin 

and a lighter green mid­rib area 

(Figure 2).

      Musk thistle is generally classed 

as a biennial, but under some environ­

mental conditions it may develop as 

an annual, biennial or winter annual. 

Musk thistle reproduces and spreads 

only by seed. A musk thistle plant 

produces an average of 3,500 seeds, 

but large plants can produce up to 

10,000. Seeds are usually dissemi­

nated by wind but can also be spread 

in contaminated hay or on farm equip­

ment. Although some seed may be 

carried by wind currents for several 

miles, most fall within 100 yards of 

the site of production. 



Figure 1. Flowering musk thistle plants. 

Figure 2. Musk thistle rosette. 

      Seeds generally germinate in the fall or spring 

but may germinate any time moisture is sufficient. 

Most seeds germinate the first year, but some 

dormant musk thistle seeds can remain viable in the 

soil for as long as five to seven years.

      After seed germina­

tion, the plant develops 

a fleshy taproot with a 

rosette of leaves. The 

plant overwinters as a 

rosette. Seed stalks are 

formed in spring as the 

plant starts to bolt, 

followed by flowering 

which normally begins 

in early to mid­May 

(Figure 2A). Occasionally 

some plants can be found 

blooming through 

August. The plant dies 

after all its seeds mature. 

Figure 2A. Bolted musk 

thistle beginning to flower. 

Areas of Infestation

      Musk thistle is commonly found along roadsides, 

railroad rights­of­way, fence borders, unimproved 

areas and in pastures and hay meadows. Newly 

established thistle rosettes are inconspicuous and 

may escape notice until they bolt and bloom. Diligent 

scouting should be done during fall and spring to 

locate infestations. Musk thistle can be a problem in 

fall­planted grains and forages but is not a serious 

weed problem in crops requiring spring seedbed 

preparation. Spring tillage eliminates established 

thistle rosettes before they produce seed.

      The economic impact of musk thistle is greatest 

in pastures and rangeland. Moderate infestations of 

musk thistle have been reported to reduce pasture 

yields an average of 23 percent. Livestock won’t 

graze around musk thistle plants or in heavily 

infested areas. 



Integrated Control Tactics

for Management 

Chemical Control

      Herbicides should be applied when the musk 

thistles are in the rosette stage during fall or early 

spring. Applications made after the plants begin to 

flower are too late to provide adequate control. Plants 

treated with herbicide after the onset of flowering 

may still produce viable seed.

      Detailed information on recommended herbicides 

for thistle control is listed in the publications 

MP44, Recommended Chemicals for Weed and Brush 



Control, and MP522, Pasture Weed Control in 

Arkansas, which are available through the Coopera­

tive Extension Service website at www.uaex.edu. 



Mechanical Control

      Mowing can reduce the amount of seed produced, 

but often enough stem remains intact with the crown 

to produce flowers and seed. Mowing within two days 

after the terminal flower head blooms effectively 

inhibits seed production and reduces some branching 

of the remaining plant stems. Since thistles in a field 

do not all mature uniformly, mowing will usually 

need to be repeated to prevent seed production. 

Mowing on poor soil may actually reduce the competi­

tive effect of other plants, thus favoring musk thistle 

seedling survival.

      Digging and hand pulling are very effective for 

controlling light or scattered infestations of thistles. 

Plants must be cut off under the rosette or crown for 

effective control. If leaves or the crown bud are left 

attached to the root, the plant can still regrow and 

produce seed. Some landowners pile and burn any 

blooming plants they have pulled or dug in an 

attempt to destroy potentially viable seed. 



Cultural Control

      Good forage management practices are important 

in preventing serious musk thistle infestations. Over­

grazing and improper soil fertility management 

reduce the vigor and competitiveness of the forage, 

allowing musk thistle seedlings to become estab­

lished. A pasture program that makes use of soil 

testing and improved grazing management can 

greatly reduce the potential for thistles to 

become established.

      Cutting hay before the thistles produce seed 

prevents on­farm and off­farm movement of seed in 

the hay. Refusing to buy hay that contains musk 

thistle seed can help prevent musk thistles from 

becoming established on your farm. 

Biological Control

      Biological control, the practice of using natural 

enemies, can reduce musk thistle populations and 

reduce the spread of musk thistles. Two species of 

weevils that attack musk thistle have become estab­

lished in Arkansas. These weevils are the flower head 

weevil (Rhinocyllus conicus Froelich) and the rosette 

weevil (Trichosirocalus horridus Panzar). These 

natural enemies, native to Europe, were studied 

extensively to ensure they would not damage 



economic plants. The flower head weevil will attack 

some species of native thistles.

      Establishment of these weevils in Arkansas has 

been through both natural dispersal and releases of 

weevils collected from established populations in 

Missouri. Established populations of both weevil 

species have been found in 18 counties in central and 

north Arkansas.

      The musk thistle weevils offer the benefit of 

reducing musk thistle populations in areas where no 

control measures are being made and can contribute 

significantly to long­term control efforts in areas 

where musk thistle populations are high. Control of 

thistles by the weevils is a slow but effective process. 

Missouri research has shown that the weevils can 

reduce the number of thistles by 50 to 95 percent over 

a six­ to ten­year period. 

Flower Head Weevil

      Musk thistle flower head weevils overwinter as 

adults. The adults are slender and brown with scat­

tered golden spots on the wing covers (Figure 3). They 

are about 

1



inch long and have a short, broad snout. 

In early spring, the adults emerge from overwintering 

sites and seek out musk thistle rosettes. Adults feed 

on leaves of the plants but do little damage. Females 

then mate and begin laying eggs when the plants 

start to bolt and bloom. Eggs are deposited on the 

bracts of the flowers. Each egg is covered with a 

secretion of chewed plant material, giving the eggs an 

easily noticeable brown, scale­like appearance 

(Figure 4). Each female lays an average of 100 eggs 

during its lifetime.

      The eggs hatch in six to eight days. The larvae 

tunnel into the thistle flower where they feed on the 

developing seeds (Figure 5). Some flower heads turn 

brown prematurely due to the damage caused by the 

larvae feeding in the flower or in the stem just below 

the flower (Figure 6).

      Larvae feed for about 25 to 30 days then begin 

pupation. Pupation lasts another 8 to 14 days. The 

pupa rests in an excavated cell in the flower, where it 

transforms into an adult. The adults emerge in July 

and seek overwintering sites under new musk thistle 

rosettes, ground litter or wooded areas, where they 

will remain dormant until the following spring. 

Flower head weevils usually produce only one 

generation per year. 

Figure 3. Adult musk thistle flower head weevil. 

Figure 4. Flower head weevil eggs covered with 

plant material. 

Figure 5. Musk thistle flower infested with weevil larvae. 

Figure 6. Flowers infested with weevil larvae turn 

prematurely brown. 


Figure 7. Adult musk thistle rosette weevil. 

Figure 8. Musk thistle rosette infested with rosette 

weevil larvae. 

Rosette Weevil

      Rosette weevils are slightly smaller than the 

flower head weevil with a shorter and more rounded 

body (Figure 7). This weevil is about 

1





inch long and 

has a narrow snout. It also undergoes one generation 

per year. Adult weevils emerge from summer 

dormancy in early October. They feed on the under­

side of rosette leaves by puncturing leaf tissue. 

Females lay eggs during the fall and on warm days 

during the winter. These same adults overwinter and 

resume egg laying the following spring, up until 

about May 1. The eggs are usually laid in the mid­rib 

on the underside of rosette leaves or placed directly 

in the rosette crown (Figure 8). In late spring some 

egg laying occurs in secondary buds.

      Emerging larvae burrow their way into the crown 

of the plant where they feed, causing damage to the 

growing point of the plant. Larvae complete their 

development then leave the rosette and pupate in 

the soil.

      Over time, rosette weevils have the potential to 

provide greater thistle control than the flower head 

weevil since the feeding damage by the larvae can 

kill a rosette outright or weaken the plant so it 

produces fewer flower heads and, thus, less seed. 

However, the damage caused by the rosette weevil is 

complementary to that caused by the flower head 

weevil in controlling musk thistles because the 

weevils are not in competition with each other. 



Integrated Control

      Prevention of a musk thistle infestation is easier 

than eradicating a population that has become well 

established. New infestations of musk thistle or 

invading scattered plants on a farm should be eradi­

cated before seed production occurs. A combination of 

methods previously described provides more effective 

control than reliance on any single method. 

The life cycle of the musk thistle weevils in 

relation to the seasonal development of musk thistle 

is shown in Figure 9. The chart shows an integrated 

control program using proper timing of mechanical 

and chemical control practices that encourages weevil 

populations for effective thistle control.

      Figure 9 shows that if only the flower head weevil 

is established, rosettes can be sprayed with herbicide 

between mid­March and late April, thistles can be 

mowed in mid­July after the weevil completes its 

life cycle, and new rosettes can be sprayed from 

September to mid­October. If both the flower head 

weevil and the rosette weevil are present, herbicide 

applications should be limited to the fall. Spraying 

thistle rosettes in the spring will not only kill the 

thistles but will also kill the rosette weevil larvae 

feeding in the crowns of the thistle plants. This inte­

grated approach allows maximum benefit from the 

weevils, yet allows other methods to be used for more 

effective thistle control. 



Field Collection of Musk 

Thistle Weevils 

Collection and Release

      Musk thistle weevils are not produced 

commercially but may be collected from established 

populations and released at new sites. Flower head 

weevils can be collected in early to mid­May. Rosette 

weevils are most readily found in late May to mid­

June but are more difficult to collect than the flower 

head weevil. Studies show spring­released adult 

weevils are 80 times more effective in colonizing 

musk thistle than adult weevils collected and 

released in July. Because of this, attempts to 

establish populations of weevils by moving flowers or 

plants infested with weevil larvae are generally 

not effective. 



Figure 9. Integrated control schedule matching chemical and mechanical control 

with the life cycles of musk thistle and musk thistle weevils. 

Musk Thistle 

Life Cycle 

JAN 


FEB 

ROSETTE 


egg laying 

adults 


active 

Rosette Weevil 

Life Cycle 

Flower Head 

Weevil Life Cycle 

MAR  APR 

MAY 

JUN 


JUL 

BOLTS 


FLOWERING 

DIES 


larvae 

egg 


laying 

larvae 


pupae 

pupae 


new 

adults 


emerge 

MOW 


SPRAY 

adults 


active 

new 


adults 

emerge 


MOW 

AUG 


adults 

inactive 

SEP 

OCT 


ROSETTE 

SPRAY 


SPRAY 

new adult overwinters 

NOV  DEC 

adults 


active 

egg laying 

larvae 

      A minimum of 500 flower head weevils or 



200 rosette weevils should be released at a new site 

to help ensure establishment of either weevil species. 

Weevils can be sprinkled over the leaves and blooms 

of musk thistle plants, then plant­to­plant movement 

of the weevils provides adequate dispersal. Written 

records of the release and a photograph of the site 

will help document the establishment and effect of 

the weevils over time. 



Collection Techniques

      Simple equipment can be used for collecting 

weevils. Weevils can be collected in a canvas insect 

sweep net, plastic trash bag or large plastic bucket. 

A large pan or plastic dish pan will serve to deposit 

weevils in for sorting. Other items include leather 

gloves, a three­foot­long dowel or stick, small card­

board boxes or one­pint ice cream cartons for each 

500 weevils collected, large ice chest and ice packs 

or ice.


      Musk thistle weevils are most active on sunny, 

warm days. It is best to collect flower head weevils 

when plants have bolted one to two feet. Rosette 

weevils will be more numerous after the plants begin 

to bloom. Because of some overlap of emergence and 

egg laying of flower head and rosette weevils, both 

species are sometimes collected at the same time.

      To collect the weevils, bend the bolting portion of 

a musk thistle plant into the canvas sweep net while 

wearing leather gloves. Rap on the plant several 

times with the dowel rod. This will cause the weevils 

to feign death and drop into the sweep net.

      After netting 50 to 100 weevils, dump the sweep 

net contents into the plastic wash basin for sorting. 

Keep the basin in the shade to prevent its surface 

from heating up and causing the weevils to fly off. 



Storage and Transport

      Adult weevils can be stored and transported in 

lots of up to 500 in small cardboard cartons. A thistle 

bud or bloom should be included in the carton, and 

the lid should be sealed tightly to prevent escape. 

Plastic cartons should not be used because they allow 

moisture to build up, increasing mortality. Cardboard 

cartons of weevils can be stored for up to a week in 

an insulated chest if kept dry and cool (but not 

frozen) with ice or ice packs. Release weevils at the 

new site as soon as possible after collection to enable 

them to deposit most of their eggs at the release site 

rather than in the carton. 

Suggestions for Successful 

Weevil Releases 

Studies show establishment success of musk 

thistle weevils is improved by following these 

factors: 

1.   The area should not be mowed or sprayed. 

(Rights­of­way and unimproved fields 

work well.) 

2.   Areas with heavy infestations work best (at 

least 1,000 musk thistle plants). 

3.   All the weevils should be placed in the same 

area (five to ten per plant). 

4.   Release weevils away from livestock. 

5.   Five to seven years may be required before 

weevil populations are high enough to 

provide significant thistle control. 

Summary

 •   Musk thistle plants reproduce only by seed. 

Mature plants die after seed is produced.

 •   Herbicides are most effective if applied 

during spring or fall to musk thistles in the 

rosette stage.

 •   Rosette weevil larvae feed in the thistle 

crown and weaken or kill the plant.

 •   Flower head weevil larvae feed in the flower 

and reduce the number of seed produced.

 •   Mowing is most effective when done within 

two days after the terminal flower blooms.

 •   Good pasture management practices reduce 

establishment of musk thistles.

 •   Integrated control, using a combination of 

biological, chemical, mechanical and cultural 

control methods, is the most effective 

program for reducing infestations of 

musk thistles. 

The authors wish to thank Doug Ladner, USDA­Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; David Blackburn, Arkansas State Plant 

Board; Joe Williams and Larry White of the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission; Glen Sutton, Natural Resources 

Conservation Service; and Tom Riley, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Arkansas, for serving on the steering committee and 

for their contributions to this project. 

Acknowledgment is given to Dr. Ben Puttler, Extension Assistant Professor of Entomology, University of Missouri, for providing 

information and technical review of this publication. 

Printed by University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service Printing Services. 



DR. JOHN JENNINGS, professor ­ forages, and DR. JOHN BOYD,  

professor ­ weed science, with the University of Arkansas System  

Division of Agriculture are located in Little Rock. DR. GUS LORENZ,  

associate department head ­ entomology, with the University of  

Arkansas System Division of Agriculture is located in Lonoke.  

DR. DON STEINKRAUS, professor ­ entomology, is located in the  

Department of Entomology at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.  



DR. TIM KRING is a former professor ­ entomology at the University  

of Arkansas, Fayetteville.  

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 

and  June  30,  1914,  in  cooperation  with  the  U.S.  Department  of 

Agriculture,  Director,  Cooperative  Extension  Service,  University  of 

Arkansas. The  University  of  Arkansas  System  Division  of  Agricul­

ture  offers  all  its  Extension  and  Research  programs  and  services 

without regard to race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, 

national  origin,  religion,  age,  disability,  marital  or  veteran  status, 

genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an 

Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. 

FSA3054­PD­7­2016RV 





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə