Ugu emf: Biodiversity Assessment June 2013 I



Yüklə 6,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/16
tarix18.08.2017
ölçüsü6,45 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16

UGU EMF: Biodiversity Assessment
 
June 2013
 
 
I   
 
 
 
 
 
Development of an Environmental Management 
Framework for the Ugu District: 
 
Biodiversity Assessment
 
 
 
 
Date: June 2013
 
 
 
Lead Author: Douglas Macfarlane 
 
Report NoEP71-02
 
 

UGU EMF: Biodiversity Assessment
 
June 2013
 
 
II   
 
 
 
 
 
Prepared for: 
 
 
 
 
Mott MacDonald South Africa (Pty) Ltd 
 
 
 
By 
 
 
 
 
Please direct any queries to: 
 
Douglas Macfarlane 
 
 
Cell: 0843684527 
26 Mallory Road, Hilton, South Africa, 3245 
Email: 
dmacfarlane@eco-pulse.co.za
 

UGU EMF: Biodiversity Assessment
 
June 2013
 
 
I   
 
 
 
 
SUGGESTED CITATION 
Macfarlane, D.M. and Richardson, J.  2013. Development of an Environmental Management Framework for the 
Ugu District:  Biodiversity Assessment.  Unpublished report No EP71-02, June 2013.  Prepared for Mott MacDonald 
South Africa (Pty) Ltd by Eco-Pulse Environmental Consulting Services.
 
 
DISCLAIMER 
The project deliverables, including the reported results, comments, recommendations and conclusions, are 
based on the project teams’ knowledge as well information available at the time of compilation and are not 
guaranteed to be free from error or omission. The study is based on assessment techniques and investigations 
that are limited by time and budgetary constraints applicable to the type and level of project undertaken.  
 
Eco-Pulse Environmental Consulting Services exercises all reasonable skill, care and diligence in the provision of 
services. However, the authors and contributors also accept no responsibility or consequential liability for the 
use of the supplied project deliverables (in part or in whole) and any information or material contained therein. 
 
FURTHER INFORMATION 
Much of the information presented in this report was prepared as part of the Biodiversity Sector Plan (BSP) for 
the Ugu District (Macfarlane et.al., 2013a).  Additional information in the form of Geographical Information 
Systems (GIS) shapefiles used to prepare the Critical Biodiversity Areas Maps referred to in this status quo report, 
together with the original BSP report and associated guidelines can be obtained by contacting 
data@kznwildlife.com. 
 
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
This report sets out the findings of a specialist biodiversity assessment, commissioned as one of a number of 
technical reports aimed at informing the development of an Environmental Management Framework for the 
Ugu District.    
 
The first section of the report provides an overview of legislation governing management of biodiversity 
nationally and regionally.  This serves to highlight the plethora of environmental legislation available to support 
the protection of biodiversity with a specific focus on outlining practical implications for municipalities in the 
context of development planning.  Despite this legal framework, significant progress is needed in order to 
effectively integrate biodiversity imperatives with spatial planning and decision making.  This highlights the 
importance of this study to help entrench biodiversity issues within the broader planning context. 

UGU EMF: Biodiversity Assessment
 
June 2013
 
 
II   
 
 
 
 
 
A biophysical overview of the Ugu District is provided as a background to understanding biodiversity patterns 
within the study area.  This includes an overview of current transformation and dominant land uses that have 
caused biodiversity loss within the district.  The status quo of biodiversity in the study area is then presented in a 
structured manner by focussing on a number of indicators.  The following highlights are worth noting in this 
regard: 

 
Maputaland-Pondoland Albany biodiversity ‘hotspot’:   The importance of the area is emphasised by noting 
the location of the municipality within this regional ‘hotspot’ which, despite significant (

70%) 
transformation, is still recognised for its unusually high levels of endemism. 

 
Status of vegetation types:  High levels of transformation in the study area have contributed to five 
vegetation types being classified as critically endangered and a further three vegetation types being 
classified as endangered.  Together, these vegetation types account for 58% of the study area while 24% of 
vegetation types are vulnerable , while only 17% are classified as least threatened. 

 
Alien invasive plants:  Large sections of the Ugu District are affected by alien invasive plant species with the 
highest densities reported to the south and west of the study area.  Current and potential future expansion 
of affected areas poses a significant risk to remaining untransformed areas. 

 
River ecosystems:  Most rivers including the two major perennial rivers are reported as being in good 
condition (A/B class). A number of the smaller rivers are more heavily modified and classified as moderately 
(C class) to heavily (D class) impacted.  While detailed information is lacking for some of the smaller rivers, 
surrounding land cover suggests that many of these systems are “not intact”, including a large number of 
discrete, short river systems flowing into the Indian Ocean. 

 
Wetland ecosystems:  An estimated 67% of wetland areas have been subject to transformation, significantly 
affecting the ecosystem services derived from these resources.  While no critically endangered wetland 
types were identified in the provincial assessment, more than 50% of wetlands fall within an endangered 
wetland vegetation type.  The national assessment paints a worse picture with many wetland vegetation 
groups classified as critically endangered in the study area.  

 
Estuaries:  Estuaries are heavily impacted with only 20% of estuaries in a Good or Excellent condition.  Of the 
remainder, 30% area reportedly in a Poor condition while the remaining 50% are in Fair condition. 

 
Species status:  A wide range of threatened fauna and flora species occur in the Ugu District.  This includes 
at least 6 species regarded as critically endangered with a further 22 species that are endangered. 

 
Level of protection:  Less than 2% of the study area falls within formally protected areas which is significantly 
lower than international and national benchmarks. 

 
Management of protected areas:  A recent assessment suggests that existing protected areas all fall below 
the recommended minimum standard with an average management effectiveness score of close to 60%.  
Some areas are also subject to significant pressures which also threaten to compromise protected area 
objectives.   
 
The importance of areas for biodiversity conservation are then presented in the form of a Critical Biodiversity 
Area (CBA) map based on the outputs of the recent Biodiversity Sector Plan (BSP) prepared for the Ugu District.  
The CBA map indicates areas of terrestrial land, aquatic features as well as marine areas which must be 
safeguarded in their natural state if biodiversity is to persist and ecosystems are to continue functioning. The 

UGU EMF: Biodiversity Assessment
 
June 2013
 
 
III   
 
 
 
 
CBA map aims to guide sustainable development in the District by providing a synthesis of biodiversity 
information to decision makers and serves as the common reference for all multi-sectoral planning procedures, 
advising which areas can be developed in a sustainable manner, and which areas of critical biodiversity value 
should be protected against biodiversity threats and impacts such as development.  
 
Focal areas for management have also been identified by prioritizing CBA areas identified in the BSP.  This was 
done by spatially integrating information on threat and biodiversity importance to identify areas with high 
biodiversity value and potentially subject to high levels natural and anthropogenic threats.  The resultant map 
should serve to focus conservation efforts of Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife, Municipalities and other 
biodiversity stakeholders with an interest in conserving priority conservation areas. 
 
Key issues affecting biodiversity within the study area have also been highlighted.  Key drivers include demand 
for land for economic and social development, agricultural activities, subsistence living areas and climate 
change. These, together with a range of other drivers continue to exert pressure on the remaining areas of 
untransformed habitat that not only provide habitat for a range of important species, but provide a range of 
goods and services to people living in and around the study area.  These pressures and resultant impacts have 
given rise to the status quo and will lead to further biodiversity losses if not addressed through appropriate 
directed actions.  A range of responses have therefore been proposed in order to ensure that biodiversity 
concerns are addressed and that society’s basic rights to an environment which is not harmful to their health or 
well-being and to have the environment protected for the benefit of present and future generations are 
upheld. 
 
Finally, a range of monitoring indicators are suggested as a means of monitoring the state of the environment 
within the study area.  These monitoring indicators should ideally be assessed on a regular basis in order to 
monitor how effectively biodiversity aspects are being addressed in the district. 

UGU EMF: Biodiversity Assessment
 
June 2013
 
 
IV   
 
 
 
 
CONTENTS 
1.  INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................................................. 1 
1.1 
What is “biodiversity” and why is it important? .................................................................................................... 1 
1.2 
Background to this consultancy ............................................................................................................................. 1 
1.3 
Scope of work ............................................................................................................................................................ 2 
1.4 
Project team ............................................................................................................................................................... 3 
1.5 
Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................................................. 3 
1.6 
General description of the study area .................................................................................................................. 3 
 
2.  METHODOLOGY FOLLOWED ............................................................................................................................................. 5 
2.1 
Legal review ............................................................................................................................................................... 5 
2.2 
Providing a biophysical overview of the area ..................................................................................................... 5 
2.3 
Assessment of present state .................................................................................................................................... 5 
2.3.1  Regional conservation context ............................................................................................................................ 5 
2.3.2  Evaluating the present state of terrestrial ecosystems ..................................................................................... 5 
2.3.3  Evaluating the present state of aquatic ecosystems ....................................................................................... 6 
2.3.4  Reporting on threatened species ........................................................................................................................ 6 
2.3.5  Assessing the level and effectiveness of biodiversity protection ................................................................... 6 
2.4 
Mapping the importance of areas for biodiversity conservation ..................................................................... 7 
2.5 
Identification of focal areas for management .................................................................................................... 8 
2.6 
Identification of key environmental issues and recommended responses .................................................... 9 
2.7 
Identification of indicators for monitoring ............................................................................................................. 10 
 
3.  LEGAL FRAMEWORK .......................................................................................................................................................... 10 
 
4.  BIOPHYSICAL OVERVIEW OF THE DISTRICT ...................................................................................................................... 12 
4.1 
Climate ........................................................................................................................................................................ 12 
4.2 
Landscape and Topography .................................................................................................................................. 13 
4.3 
Geology and Geomorphology ............................................................................................................................... 15 
4.4 
Land use and transformation .................................................................................................................................. 16 
 
5.  STATUS QUO OF BIODIVERSITY ......................................................................................................................................... 18 
5.1 
Regional Conservation Context ............................................................................................................................. 18 
5.2 
Terrestrial ecosystems ................................................................................................................................................ 19 
5.2.1  Vegetation types .................................................................................................................................................... 19 
5.2.2  Alien invasive plants ............................................................................................................................................... 24 
5.3 
Aquatic ecosystems .................................................................................................................................................. 25 
5.3.1  Rivers ......................................................................................................................................................................... 25 
5.3.2  Wetlands (freshwater) ............................................................................................................................................ 27 

UGU EMF: Biodiversity Assessment
 
June 2013
 
 
V   
 
 
 
 
5.3.3  Estuaries .................................................................................................................................................................... 29 
5.4 
Species of special concern – flora & fauna ......................................................................................................... 31 
5.4.1  Plants ......................................................................................................................................................................... I 
5.4.2  Mammals .................................................................................................................................................................. 32 
5.4.3  Birds ........................................................................................................................................................................... 32 
5.4.4  Amphibians .............................................................................................................................................................. 32 
5.4.5  Reptiles ..................................................................................................................................................................... 33 
5.4.6  Invertebrates............................................................................................................................................................ 33 
5.4.7  Fish ............................................................................................................................................................................. 33 
5.5 
Protected areas ......................................................................................................................................................... 33 
5.5.1  Extent of formally protected areas ..................................................................................................................... 33 
5.5.2  Management effectiveness and pressures facing protected areas ............................................................ 36 
 
6.  MAPPING THE IMPORTANCE OF AREAS FOR BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION ............................................................... 38 
6.1 
Critical Biodiversity Areas (CBAs) ............................................................................................................................ 40 
6.1.1  Terrestrial CBAs ........................................................................................................................................................ 40 
6.1.2  Aquatic CBAs .......................................................................................................................................................... 41 
6.1.3  Estuarine CBAs ......................................................................................................................................................... 41 
6.1.4  Marine CBAs ............................................................................................................................................................ 41 
6.2 
Ecological Support Areas (ESAs) ............................................................................................................................. 42 
6.2.1  Terrestrial ESAs .......................................................................................................................................................... 42 
6.2.2  Aquatic ESAs ............................................................................................................................................................ 43 
6.2.3  Estuarine ESAs .......................................................................................................................................................... 43 
6.2.4  Marine ESAs .............................................................................................................................................................. 43 
6.3 
Ecological Infrastructure (EI) .................................................................................................................................... 44 
6.3.1  Terrestrial EI ............................................................................................................................................................... 45 
6.3.2  Aquatic EI ................................................................................................................................................................. 45 
 
7.  IDENTIFICATION OF FOCAL AREAS FOR CONSERVATION ACTION ............................................................................... 46 
 
8.  KEY ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES ........................................................................................................................................... 47 
 
9.  MONITORING INDICATORS .............................................................................................................................................. 54 
 
10. CONCLUSION .................................................................................................................................................................... 55 
 
11. REFERENCES ....................................................................................................................................................................... 57 
 
12. ANNEXURES ....................................................................................................................................................................... 59
 
 

UGU EMF: Biodiversity Assessment
 
June 2013
 
 
VI   
 
 
 
 
LIST OF FIGURES 
Figure 1. 
Regional map of the Ugu District Municipality showing local municipalities within the UDM and the 
surrounding Districts. ............................................................................................................................................ 4 
Figure 2. 
Outline of the approach followed in developing a priorities map for the study area. .......................... 9 

Каталог: Documents
Documents -> Исследование диагностических моделей по Пону и Коркхаузу
Documents -> 3 пародонтологическая хирургия
Documents -> Hemoglobinin yenidoğanda yapim azliğina bağli anemiler
Documents -> Q ə r a r Azərbaycan Respublikası adından
Documents -> Ubutumire uniib iratumiye abantu, imigwi y'abantu canke amashirahamwe bose bipfuza gushikiriza inkuru hamwe/canke ivyandiko bijanye n'ihonyangwa ry'agateka ka zina muntu hamwe n'ayandi mabi yose vyakozwe I Burundi guhera mu kwezi kwa Ndamukiza
Documents -> Videotherapy Video: Cool Runnings Sixth Grade
Documents -> Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs
Documents -> Document Outline form monthly ret cont
Documents -> Şİrvan şƏHƏr məRKƏZLƏŞDİRİLMİŞ Kİtabxana sistemi
Documents -> İnsan hüquq müdafiəçilərinin vəziyyəti üzrə Xüsusi Məruzəçi

Yüklə 6,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə