The V e r y b e st care



Yüklə 324,22 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix25.05.2017
ölçüsü324,22 Kb.

 TO

 P

ROV



I

D

E



 THE

 V

E

R

Y B

E

ST CARE

 F

O



R E

A

C



H

 

PATI



E

N

T



 O

N

 E



V

E

R



Y OCCA

S

I



ON

If English is not your frst 

language and you need help, 

please contact the Ethnic Health 

Team on 0161 627 8770

For general enquiries please contact the Patient  

Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) on 0161 604 5897

For enquiries regarding clinic appointments, clinical care and 

treatment please contact 0161 624 0420 and the Switchboard 

Operator will put you through to the correct department / service

www.pat.nhs.uk

Wood pulp sourced from 

sustainable forests

Jeżeli angielski nie jest twoim pierwszym językiem i potrzebujesz pomocy proszę skontaktować 

się z załogą Ethnic Health pod numerem telefonu 0161 627 8770

Trans Urethral

Resection of the

Prostate (TURP)

An information guide



2

Trans  Urethral  Resection  of  the  Prostate

(TURP)

What is the prostate?

The prostate is a fleshy organ which is wrapped around the neck of

the bladder and around the urethra, the tube which empties urine

from the bladder. It is made of glands and muscle and it has a very

rich blood supply. When a man has an orgasm the prostate muscle

squeezes a small amount of fluid from the glands into the semen

where it seems to help sperm become more mobile.

Why might you need a TURP?

A TURP is usually carried out because a man has had bothersome

urinary symptom; for example:

• poor flow or interrupted stream whilst urinating

• recurrent urinary tract infections

•  having  to  get  up  during  the  night  to  urinate  (sometimes

frequently)

• feeling of not emptying your bladder properly

• dribbling especially after urinating

• for some men it may prove impossible to pass urine. This is caused

by an increase in the size of the prostate, which occurs with age.

The prostate is situated under the bladder and around the urethra.

This  enlargement  causes  constrictions  on  this  passageway  and

results in the urinary symptoms

The amount of enlargement varies from man to man, as do the

problems which it causes. In most this is an entirely benign (non-

cancerous) process, which is so common it could almost


3

be considered a normal part of getting old. In a small number of

men the growth is a malignant (cancerous) growth. The condition

in which a prostate is simply enlarged is known as Benign Prostatic

Hypertrophy (BPH).

What is a TURP?

It is a procedure where the surgeon removes part of the prostate

from the bladder through the urethra using a special fine telescopic

instrument, which allows him to see the prostatic tissue and remove

it. There are no cuts or stitches. It can be carried out under a general

or spinal anaesthetic.



What are the risks?

If this operation is carried out under general anaesthetic there is a

small risk of complications to your heart and lungs. However before

the operation you will attend the pre-operative assessment clinic

where tests will be carried out. These results will ensure that the

operation is carried out in the safest way possible for you, which

may involve you having a spinal anaesthetic instead.

Most of the risks will have been explained to you by your doctor but

the  main  ones  are  a  risk  of  incontinence,  infection,  retrograde

ejaculation  (where  the  sperm  goes  into  the  bladder  on  orgasm

instead of coming out of the penis) and the risk of bleeding which

could require a blood transfusion.



What are the benefits?

The main benefit is that you should be able to urinate easier and

have  fewer  problems  with  your  urinary  system.  You  should  not

need to go as frequently as you have been doing. If you have had a

catheter in then this operation will being carried out to try and get

rid of this for you.



4

What are the alternatives?

Your doctor will have already tried you on medication to see if your

urinary  symptoms  improve.  For  your  symptoms  to  improve  you

need to have this operation carried out. If you are happy with your

symptoms please discuss this with your consultant who can advise

you  about  the  operation,  as  it  may  be  needed  to  ensure  your

kidneys are not affected by your symptoms.

Before the operation

• you will be asked to attend the Pre-operative clinic where tests

may be carried out such as heart monitoring, blood tests and urine

tests


• you will be advised when to stop eating and drinking before your

operation

• if you are taking anti-coagulants (Warfarin, Aspirin or Sinthrome)

please inform the pre-op assessment staff

• please ensure you have a list of your current medications for the

pre-operative assessment Nurses

• this operation can be undertaken using either a spinal or general

anaesthetic. You may be advised at the preoperative clinic which is

most appropriate for you. If not you will be advised on the ward by

the anaesthetist

•  you  may  be  asked  to  sign  your  consent  form  after  being  fully

informed about the procedure.



What happens on your admission day

• you will be asked relevant information by the nurse and a doctor

• you may be seen by an anaesthetist

• your operation will be explained to you and you will be asked to

sign a consent form, if you have not already done this in clinic.


5

What happens after your operation?

• you may require oxygen following your operation

• you may have an IV line (drip) that will remain in place until you

are eating and drinking normally

• your blood pressure, temperature, pulse and respiration rate will

be recorded by the nurse

• you may experience some pain and discomfort after surgery. We

advise that you keep a supply of pain killers at home

• you should be able to eat and drink normally once the anaesthetic

has worn off

• you will have a catheter in your bladder which will be draining

blood  stained  urine  you  may  also  have  irrigation  fluid  running

through this catheter into your bladder to help to stop the bleeding

• you will need to stay in bed whilst the irrigation is flowing which is

for approximately 24 hours

• the doctor will decide when the irrigation fluid can be removed.

This is usually the day after your surgery as long as the bleeding has

settled.  Once  this  has  been  removed  you  will  be  encouraged  to

drink plenty of extra fluids to help your catheter to continue to

flow


• the doctor will decide when your catheter can be removed. This is

usually 2 days after your operation

• the nurses will assess how well you are passing urine and you will

need to use bottles, so it can be measured and recorded, a different

bottle should be used each time you pass urine

• as there is a slight risk of incontinence following this surgery you

therefore may be taught pelvic floor exercises if needed

• you may be given antibiotics, but you must ensure you complete

the course


6

• your doctor and nurses will discuss with you when they are happy

for you to go home

• if you require a fit note to cover your hospital stay, please ask the

nurses on the ward. Any further fit notes can be obtained from your

GP

•  your  consultant  may  arrange  to  see  you  in  the  outpatient



department if this is required, although this is not always necessary

• you may feel tired for a few weeks after the operation, but this

will gradually improve. It can take up to 3 months before you are

back to your usual self

• you can drive once you can perform an emergency stop without

any discomfort, which is generally after three weeks

• avoid becoming constipated as straining can put pressure on the

prostatic area and cause bleeding.



Common questions following TURP

Will I still get blood in my urine?

There will still be some blood in your urine for at least 2-3 weeks

following the operation and sometimes as long as 4-5 weeks. It can

take up to 6 weeks for the prostate to heal. Around 10 days after

the operation you may see some more blood in your urine, this is

due to the “scab” falling off. If you do get blood in your urine try

and drink more fluids. If the bleeding continues to be heavy or if

you are concerned contact your GP. Discomfort on passing urine,

having a temperature and excessive bleeding could be a sign of

infection.  You  should  see  your  GP  who  will  decide  what  action

should be taken.


7

Will I notice an immediate improvement in my waterworks?

At first you may experience some difficulty in controlling your urine

and may continue to go to the toilet frequently. Be patient - staff

will  advise  you  on  pelvic  floor  exercises  to  help  control  your

dribbling.  It  can  take  up  to  six  months  before  you  see  the  full

benefit.


Do I still need a lot to drink?

Yes  –  until  any  bleeding  settles,  which  should  be  within  2  to  3

weeks, then drink 6-8 cups every day of any fluid e.g. tea, coffee,

fruit juice, water. It is better not to drink too much after 6-8pm to

avoid having to go to the toilet in the night. You may drink alcohol

in moderation after completing any antibiotic therapy which may

have been prescribed.

Should I continue to take my tablets?

Yes – unless your doctor has told you to stop. The ward staff will go

through your medications with you on discharge. When you finish

your  supply  of  tablets  you  should  return  to  your  GP  for  further

advice. If you have been on tablets for your waterworks before the

operation you do not need to continue with these afterwards.



Can I do exercise?

Only gentle exercise is recommended for the first 2-3 weeks. Try to

avoid  heavy  lifting  or  straining.  You  may  start  driving  short

distances after one week. Driving long distances should be avoided

for 2-3 weeks.


8

Can I go on holiday?

There  is  no  reason  why  you  cannot  go  on  holiday  after  the

operation. Although flights or long distance travelling is best left

for  2-3  weeks.  You  must  also  inform  your  holiday  insurance

company that you have just had an operation

Can I have sex?

You should be able to enjoy a normal sex life, but it is best to wait at

least  2-3  weeks  after  your  operation.  One  very  common

consequence  of  the  operation  is  “retrograde  ejaculation”.  This

means that when you have an orgasm nothing comes out of the

penis.  This  is  because  the  sperm  is  going  back  into  the  bladder

instead of outwards in the usual way. It is a harmless side effect but

it does mean that your fertility will be reduced, making it difficult

to  father  children.  A  large  number  of  people  having  a  prostate

operation suffer this side effect.



Have I got cancer?

Most enlarged prostates are not due to cancer. When you have the

operation a specimen is always routinely sent to test for cancer. The

results of this can take up to 10-14 days so it is most likely you will

have been discharged before we receive it. Most patients are not

given a follow up appointment, your GP will be informed about the

results and if there is a need to discuss anything further with you an

appointment will be sent.

If you are worried or have problems after your discharge, contact

your GP or telephone the ward for advice. In an emergency, go to

the nearest Accident & Emergency department.


9

10

11

 TO

 P

ROV



I

D

E



 THE

 V

E

R

Y B

E

ST CARE

 F

O



R E

A

C



H

 

PATI



E

N

T



 O

N

 E



V

E

R



Y OCCA

S

I



ON

If English is not your frst 

language and you need help, 

please contact the Ethnic Health 

Team on 0161 627 8770

For general enquiries please contact the Patient  

Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) on 0161 604 5897

For enquiries regarding clinic appointments, clinical care and 

treatment please contact 0161 624 0420 and the Switchboard 

Operator will put you through to the correct department / service

www.pat.nhs.uk

Wood pulp sourced from 

sustainable forests

Jeżeli angielski nie jest twoim pierwszym językiem i potrzebujesz pomocy proszę skontaktować 



się z załogą Ethnic Health pod numerem telefonu 0161 627 8770

Date of publication: November 2006

Date of review: February 2014

Date of next review: February 2017

Ref: PI_SU_282

© The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust


Yüklə 324,22 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə