The Project Gutenberg ebook of The Golden Bough: a study



Yüklə 4,09 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/52
tarix06.07.2017
ölçüsü4,09 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   52

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Golden Bough: A Study

in Magic and Religion (Third Edition, Vol. 11 of 12) by James

George Frazer

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost

and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.

You may copy

it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project

Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at

http://www.gutenberg.org/license

Title: The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion

(Third Edition, Vol.

11 of 12)

Author: James George Frazer

Release Date: July 9, 2013 [Ebook 43433]

Language: English

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK

THE GOLDEN BOUGH: A STUDY IN MAGIC AND

RELIGION (THIRD EDITION, VOL. 11 OF 12)***



The Golden Bough

A Study in Magic and Religion

By

James George Frazer, D.C.L., LL.D.,



Litt.D.

Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge

Professor of Social Anthropology in the University of

Liverpool

Vol. XI. of XII.

Part VII: Balder the Beautiful.

The Fire-Festivals of Europe and the Doctrine of

the External Soul.

Vol. 2 of 2.

New York and London

MacMillan and Co.

1913


Contents

Chapter VI. Fire-Festivals in Other Lands. . . . . . . . . .

2

§ 1. The Fire-walk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .



2

§ 2. The Meaning of the Fire-walk. . . . . . . . . . . .

18

Chapter VII. The Burning of Human Beings in the Fires. .



25

§ 1. The Burning of Effigies in the Fires. . . . . . . . .

25

§ 2. The Burning of Men and Animals in the Fires.



. .

29

Chapter VIII. The Magic Flowers of Midsummer Eve. . . .



53

Chapter IX. Balder and the Mistletoe.

. . . . . . . . . . .

90

Chapter X. The Eternal Soul in Folk-Tales.



. . . . . . . . 113

Chapter XI. The External Soul in Folk-Custom. . . . . . . 177

§ 1. The External Soul in Inanimate Things. . . . . . . 177

§ 2. The External Soul in Plants. . . . . . . . . . . . . 184

§ 3. The External Soul in Animals. . . . . . . . . . . . 227

§ 4. A Suggested Theory of Totemism. . . . . . . . . . 253

§ 5. The Ritual of Death and Resurrection. . . . . . . . 262

Chapter XII. The Golden Bough. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324

Chapter XIII. Farewell to Nemi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353

Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359

I. Snake Stones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359

II. The Transformation of Witches Into Cats. . . . . . . 359

III. African Balders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360

IV. The Mistletoe and the Golden Bough. . . . . . . . 364

Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373

Footnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 649



[Transcriber's Note: The above cover image was produced by

the submitter at Distributed Proofreaders, and is being placed

into the public domain.]

[001]


Chapter VI. Fire-Festivals in Other

Lands.


§ 1. The Fire-walk.

Bonfires


at

the


Pongol festival in

Southern India.

At first sight the interpretation of the European fire customs as

charms for making sunshine is confirmed by a parallel custom

observed by the Hindoos of Southern India at the Pongol or

Feast of Ingathering.

The festival is celebrated in the early

part of January, when, according to Hindoo astrologers, the

sun enters the tropic of Capricorn, and the chief event of the

festival coincides with the passage of the sun. For some days

previously the boys gather heaps of sticks, straw, dead leaves,

and everything that will burn. On the morning of the first day

of the festival the heaps are fired. Every street and lane has its

bonfire. The young folk leap over the flames or pile on fresh

fuel. This fire is an offering to Sûrya, the sun-god, or to Agni, the

deity of fire; it “wakes him from his sleep, calling on him again

to gladden the earth with his light and heat.”

1

If this is indeed



the explanation which the people themselves give of the festival,

it seems decisive in favour of the solar explanation of the fires;

for to say that the fires waken the sun-god from his sleep is only

a metaphorical or mythical way of saying that they actually help

to rekindle the sun's light and heat. But the hesitation which the

1

Ch. E. Gover, “The Pongol Festival in Southern India,” Journal of the



Royal Asiatic Society, N.S., v. (1870) pp. 96 sq.

§ 1. The Fire-walk.

3

writer indicates between the two distinct deities of sun and fire



seems to prove that he is merely giving his own interpretation of

the rite, not reporting the views of the celebrants. If that is so,

[002]

the expression of his opinion has no claim to authority.



A festival of Northern India which presents points of

Bonfires at the Holi

festival in Northern

India. The village

priest expected to

pass through the

fire. Leaping over

the ashes of the fire

to get rid of disease.

resemblance to the popular European celebrations which we

have been considering is the Holi. This is a village festival held

in early spring at the full moon of the month Phalgun. Large

bonfires are lit and young people dance round them. The people

believe that the fires prevent blight, and that the ashes cure

disease. At Barsana the local village priest is expected to pass

through the Holi bonfire, which, in the opinion of the faithful,

cannot burn him. Indeed he holds his land rent-free simply on

the score of his being fire-proof. On one occasion when the

priest disappointed the expectant crowd by merely jumping over

the outermost verge of the smouldering ashes and then bolting

into his cell, they threatened to deprive him of his benefice if

he did not discharge his spiritual functions better when the next

Holi season came round. Another feature of the festival which

has, or once had, its counterpart in the corresponding European

ceremonies is the unchecked profligacy which prevails among

the Hindoos at this time.

2

In Kumaon, a district of North-West



India, at the foot of the Himalayas, each clan celebrates the Holi

festival by cutting down a tree, which is thereupon stripped of its

leaves, decked with shreds of cloth, and burnt at some convenient

place in the quarter of the town inhabited by the clan. Some of

the songs sung on this occasion are of a ribald character. The

2

W. Crooke, Popular Religion and Folk-lore of Northern India (Westminster,



1896), ii. 314 sqq.; Captain G. R. Hearn, “Passing through the Fire at Phalon,”

Man, v. (1905) pp. 154 sq. On the custom of walking through fire, or rather

over a furnace, see Andrew Lang, Modern Mythology (London, 1897), pp.

148-175; id., in Athenaeum, 26th August and 14th October, 1899; id., in

Folk-lore, xii. (1901) pp. 452-455; id., in Folk-lore, xiv. (1903) pp. 87-89. Mr.

Lang was the first to call attention to the wide prevalence of the rite in many

parts of the world.


4The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion (Third Edition, Vol. 11 of 12)

people leap over the ashes of the fire, believing that they thus

rid themselves of itch and other diseases of the skin. While the

trees are burning, each clan tries to carry off strips of cloth from

the tree of another clan, and success in the attempt is thought to

ensure good luck. In Gwalior large heaps of cow-dung are burnt

instead of trees. Among the Marwaris the festival is celebrated by

the women with obscene songs and gestures. A monstrous and

[003]

disgusting image of a certain Nathuram, who is said to have been



a notorious profligate, is set up in a bazaar and then smashed with

blows of shoes and bludgeons while the bonfire of cow-dung is

blazing. No household can be without an image of Nathuram,

and on the night when the bride first visits her husband, the

image of this disreputable personage is placed beside her couch.

Barren women and mothers whose children have died look to

Nathuram for deliverance from their troubles.

3

Various stories



are told to account for the origin of the Holi festival. According

to one legend it was instituted in order to get rid of a troublesome

demon (rákshasí). The people were directed to kindle a bonfire

and circumambulate it, singing and uttering fearlessly whatever

might come into their minds. Appalled by these vociferations,

by the oblations to fire, and by the laughter of the children, the

demon was to be destroyed.

4

In the Chinese province of Fo-Kien we also meet with a vernal



Vernal

festival


of fire in China.

Ceremony


to

ensure an abundant

year.

Walking


through

the


fire.

Ashes of the fire

mixed

with


the

fodder of the cattle.

festival of fire which may be compared to the fire-festivals of

Europe. The ceremony, according to an eminent authority, is a

solar festival in honour of the renewal of vegetation and of the

vernal warmth. It falls in April, on the thirteenth day of the third

month in the Chinese calendar, and is doubtless connected with

3

Pandit Janardan Joshi, in North Indian Notes and Queries, iii. pp. 92



sq., § 199 (September, 1893); W. Crooke, Popular Religion and Folk-lore of

Northern India (Westminster, 1896), ii. 318 sq.

4

E. T. Atkinson, “Notes on the History of Religion in the Himalayas of the



N.W. Provinces,” Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, liii. Part i. (Calcutta,

1884) p. 60. Compare W. Crooke, Popular Religion and Folk-lore of Northern



India (Westminster, 1896), ii. 313 sq.

§ 1. The Fire-walk.

5

the ancient custom of renewing the fire, which, as we saw, used



to be observed in China at this season.

5

The chief performers in



the ceremony are labourers, who refrain from women for seven

days, and fast for three days before the festival. During these

days they are taught in the temple how to discharge the difficult

and dangerous duty which is to be laid upon them. On the eve of

the festival an enormous brazier of charcoal, sometimes twenty

feet wide, is prepared in front of the temple of the Great God, the

protector of life. At sunrise next morning the brazier is lighted

and kept burning by fresh supplies of fuel. A Taoist priest

[004]

throws a mixture of salt and rice on the fire to conjure the flames



and ensure an abundant year. Further, two exorcists, barefooted

and followed by two peasants, traverse the fire again and again

till it is somewhat beaten down. Meantime the procession is

forming in the temple. The image of the god of the temple is

placed in a sedan-chair, resplendent with red paint and gilding,

and is carried forth by a score or more of barefooted peasants.

On the shafts of the sedan-chair, behind the image, stands a

magician with a dagger stuck through the upper parts of his

arms and grasping in each hand a great sword, with which he

essays to deal himself violent blows on the back; however, the

strokes as they descend are mostly parried by peasants, who walk

behind him and interpose bamboo rods between his back and the

swords. Wild music now strikes up, and under the excitement

caused by its stirring strains the procession passes thrice across

the furnace. At their third passage the performers are followed

by other peasants carrying the utensils of the temple; and the

rustic mob, electrified by the frenzied spectacle, falls in behind.

Strange as it may seem, burns are comparatively rare. Inured

from infancy to walking barefoot, the peasants can step with

impunity over the glowing charcoal, provided they plant their

feet squarely and do not stumble; for usage has so hardened

5

See above, vol. i. pp. 136 sq.



6The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion (Third Edition, Vol. 11 of 12)

their soles that the skin is converted into a sort of leathery or

horny substance which is almost callous to heat. But sometimes,

when they slip and a hot coal touches the sides of their feet or

ankles, they may be seen to pull a wry face and jump out of the

furnace amid the laughter of the spectators. When this part of

the ceremony is over, the procession defiles round the village,

and the priests distribute to every family a leaf of yellow paper

inscribed with a magic character, which is thereupon glued over

the door of the house. The peasants carry off the charred embers

from the furnace, pound them to ashes, and mix the ashes with

the fodder of their cattle, believing that it fattens them. However,

the Chinese Government disapproves of these performances, and

next morning a number of the performers may generally be seen

in the hands of the police, laid face downwards on the ground

and receiving a sound castigation on a part of their person which

[005]

is probably more sensitive than the soles of their feet.



6

In this last festival the essential feature of the ceremony

Passage

of

the



image of the deity

through


the

fire.


Passage of inspired

men through the

fire in India.

appears to be the passage of the image of the deity across the

fire; it may be compared to the passage of the straw effigy of

Kupalo across the midsummer bonfire in Russia.

7

As we shall see



presently, such customs may perhaps be interpreted as magical

rites designed to produce light and warmth by subjecting the

deity himself to the heat and glow of the furnace; and where,

as at Barsana, priests or sorcerers have been accustomed in

the discharge of their functions to walk through or over fire,

they have sometimes done so as the living representatives or

embodiments of deities, spirits, or other supernatural beings.

6

G. Schlegel, Uranographie Chinoise (The Hague and Leyden, 1875), pp.



143 sq.id., “La fête de fouler le feu célébrée en Chine et par les Chinois

à Java,” Internationales Archiv für Ethnographie, ix. (1896) pp. 193-195.

Compare J. J. M. de Groot, The Religious System of China, vi. (Leyden, 1910)

pp. 1292 sq. According to Professor Schlegel, the connexion between this

festival and the old custom of solemnly extinguishing and relighting the fire in

spring is unquestionable.

7

The Dying God, p. 262.


§ 1. The Fire-walk.

7

Some confirmation of this view is furnished by the beliefs and



practices of the Dosadhs, a low Indian caste in Behar and Chota

Nagpur. On the fifth, tenth, and full-moon days of three months

in the year, the priest walks over a narrow trench filled with

smouldering wood ashes, and is supposed thus to be inspired

by the tribal god Rahu, who becomes incarnate in him for a

time. Full of the spirit and also, it is surmised, of drink, the

man of god then mounts a bamboo platform, where he sings

hymns and distributes to the crowd leaves of tulsi, which cure

incurable diseases, and flowers which cause barren women to

become happy mothers. The service winds up with a feast lasting

far into the night, at which the line that divides religious fervour

from drunken revelry cannot always be drawn with absolute

precision.

8

Similarly the Bhuiyas, a Dravidian tribe of Mirzapur,



worship their tribal hero Bir by walking over a short trench

[006]


filled with fire, and they say that the man who is possessed

by the hero does not feel any pain in the soles of his feet.

9

Ceremonies of this sort used to be observed in most districts of



the Madras Presidency, sometimes in discharge of vows made

in time of sickness or distress, sometimes periodically in honour

of a deity. Where the ceremony was observed periodically, it

generally occurred in March or June, which are the months of the

vernal equinox and the summer solstice respectively. A narrow

trench, sometimes twenty yards long and half a foot deep, was

filled with small sticks and twigs, mostly of tamarind, which

8

(Sir) H. H. Risley, Tribes and Castes of Bengal, Ethnographic Glossary



(Calcutta, 1891-1892), i. 255 sq. Compare W. Crooke, Popular Religion and

Folk-lore of Northern India (Westminster, 1896), i. 19; id.Tribes and Castes

of the North-Western Provinces and Oudh (Calcutta, 1896), ii. 355. According

to Sir Herbert Risley, the trench filled with smouldering ashes is so narrow

(only a span and a quarter wide) “that very little dexterity would enable a man

to walk with his feet on either edge, so as not to touch the smouldering ashes

at the bottom.”

9

W. Crooke, Tribes and Castes of the North-Western Provinces and Oudh,



ii. 82.

8The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion (Third Edition, Vol. 11 of 12)

were kindled and kept burning till they sank into a mass of

glowing embers. Along this the devotees, often fifty or sixty in

succession, walked, ran, or leaped barefoot. In 1854 the Madras

Government instituted an enquiry into the custom, but found that

it was not attended by danger or instances of injury sufficient to

call for governmental interference.

10

The French traveller Sonnerat has described how, in the



Hindoo

fire-


festival in honour

of

Darma



Rajah

and


Draupadi.

Worshippers

walking

through


the fire.

eighteenth century, the Hindoos celebrated a fire-festival of this

sort in honour of the god Darma Rajah and his wife Drobedé

[007]


(Draupadi). The festival lasted eighteen days, during which all

who had vowed to take part in it were bound to fast, to practise

continence, to sleep on the ground without a mat, and to walk

on a furnace. On the eighteenth day the images of Darma Rajah

and his spouse were carried in procession to the furnace, and the

performers followed dancing, their heads crowned with flowers

and their bodies smeared with saffron. The furnace consisted

prove fatal, and such an accident is known to have occurred at a village in

Bengal. See H. J. Stokes, “Walking through Fire,” Indian Antiquary, ii. (1873)

pp. 190 sq. At Afkanbour, five days' march from Delhi, the Arab traveller Ibn

Batutah saw a troop of fakirs dancing and even rolling on the glowing embers

of a wood fire. See Voyages d'Ibn Batoutah (Paris, 1853-1858), ii. 6 sq., iii.

439.

10

M. J. Walhouse, “Passing through the Fire,” Indian Antiquary, vii. (1878)



pp.

126 sq. Compare J. A. Dubois, Mœurs, Institutions et Cérémonies



des Peuples de l'Inde (Paris, 1825), ii.

373; E. Thurston, Ethnographic



Notes in Southern India (Madras, 1906), pp. 471-486; G. F. D'Penha, in

Indian Antiquary, xxxi. (1902) p. 392; “Fire-walking in Ganjam,” Madras

Government Museum Bulletin, vol. iv. No. 3 (Madras, 1903), pp. 214-216.

At Akka timanhully, one of the many villages which help to make up the

town of Bangalore in Southern India, one woman at least from every house

is expected to walk through the fire at the village festival. Captain J. S. F.

Mackenzie witnessed the ceremony in 1873. A trench, four feet long by two

feet wide, was filled with live embers. The priest walked through it thrice,

and the women afterwards passed through it in batches. Capt. Mackenzie

remarks: “From the description one reads of walking through fire, I expected

something sensational. Nothing could be more tame than the ceremony we saw

performed; in which there never was nor ever could be the slightest danger to



§ 1. The Fire-walk.

9

of a trench about forty feet long, filled with hot embers. When



the images had been carried thrice round it, the worshippers

walked over the embers, faster or slower, according to the degree

of their religious fervour, some carrying their children in their

arms, others brandishing spears, swords, and standards. This

part of the ceremony being over, the bystanders hastened to rub

their foreheads with ashes from the furnace, and to beg from the

performers the flowers which they had worn in their hair; and

such as obtained them preserved the flowers carefully. The rite

was performed in honour of the goddess Drobedé (Draupadi),

the heroine of the great Indian epic, the Mahabharata. For

she married five brothers all at once; every year she left one

of her husbands to betake herself to another, but before doing

so she had to purify herself by fire. There was no fixed date

for the celebration of the rite, but it could only be held in one

of the first three months of the year.

11

In some villages the



ceremony is performed annually; in others, which cannot afford

the expense every year, it is observed either at longer intervals,

perhaps once in three, seven, ten, or twelve years, or only in

special emergencies, such as the outbreak of smallpox, cholera,

or plague. Anybody but a pariah or other person of very low

degree may take part in the ceremony in fulfilment of a vow.

For example, if a man suffers from some chronic malady, he

may vow to Draupadi that, should he be healed of his disease,

he will walk over the fire at her festival. As a preparation for

the solemnity he sleeps in the temple and observes a fast. The

celebration of the rite in any village is believed to protect the

cattle and the crops and to guard the inhabitants from dangers of

life. Some young girl, whose soles were tender, might next morning find that

she had a blister, but this would be the extent of harm she could receive.” See

Captain J. S. F. Mackenzie, “The Village Feast,” Indian Antiquary, iii. (1874)

pp. 6-9. But to fall on the hot embers might result in injuries which would

11

Sonnerat, Voyage aux Indes orientales et à la Chine (Paris, 1782), i. 247



sq.

10The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion (Third Edition, Vol. 11 of 12)

all kinds. When it is over, many people carry home the holy

[008]

ashes of the fire as a talisman which will drive away devils and



demons.

12

The Badagas, an agricultural tribe of the Neilgherry Hills in



Fire-festival

of

the



Badagas

in

Southern



India.

Sacred fire made by

friction.

Walking


through

the


fire.

Cattle driven over

the hot embers. The

fire-walk preceded

by a libation of

milk and followed

by ploughing and

sowing.


Southern India, annually celebrate a festival of fire in various

parts of their country. For example, at Nidugala the festival is

held with much ceremony in the month of January. Omens are

taken by boiling two pots of milk side by side on two hearths.

If the milk overflows uniformly on all sides, the crops will be

abundant for all the villages; but if it flows over on one side

only, the harvest will be good for villages on that side only. The

sacred fire is made by friction, a vertical stick of Rhodomyrtus



tomentosus being twirled by means of a cord in a socket let into a

thick bough of Debregeasia velutina. With this holy flame a heap

of wood of two sorts, the Eugenia Jambolana and Phyllanthus

Emblica, is kindled, and the hot embers are spread over a fire-

pit about five yards long and three yards broad. When all is

ready, the priest ties bells on his legs and approaches the fire-pit,

carrying milk freshly drawn from a cow which has calved for the

first time, and also bearing flowers of Rhododendron arboreum,

Leucas aspera, or jasmine. After doing obeisance, he throws

the flowers on the embers and then pours some of the milk over

them. If the omens are propitious, that is, if the flowers remain

for a few seconds unscorched and the milk does not hiss when it

falls on the embers, the priest walks boldly over the embers and is

followed by a crowd of celebrants, who before they submit to the

ordeal count the hairs on their feet. If any of the hairs are found to

be singed after the passage through the fire-pit, it is an ill omen.

12

Madras Government Museum, Bulletin, vol. iv. No. 1 (Madras, 1901), pp.

55-59; E. Thurston, Ethnographic Notes in Southern India (Madras, 1906), pp.

471-474. One of the places where the fire-festival in honour of Draupadi takes

place annually is the Allandur Temple, at St. Thomas's Mount, near Madras.

Compare “Fire-walking Ceremony at the Dharmaraja Festival,” The Quarterly

Journal of the Mythic Society, vol. ii. No. 1 (October, 1910), pp. 29-32.



Yüklə 4,09 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   52




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə