Textual dynamism as a heuristic for a delicate semantic description of ellipsis patterns



Yüklə 298,05 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix18.05.2017
ölçüsü298,05 Kb.

Textual  dynamism  as  a  heuristic  for  a  delicate  semantic  description  of 

ellipsis patterns 

 

Ben Clarke 

University of Portsmouth 

Park Building, King Henry I Street, Portsmouth, PO1 2DZ, United Kingdom 

 

This paper puts the case that viewing text dynamically can be valuable in the practice of semantic 



description. Using, as its case study, the statistically significant occurrence of Subject ellipsis 

across consecutive clauses in a corpus of newspaper football reports, the paper demonstrates a 

systematic difference between the lexicogrammatical characteristics of clauses containing such 

patterned use of ellipsis and the clauses of their surrounding co-text. The lexicogrammatical 

features  in  question,  which  are  analysed  in  detail  in  the  paper,  are:  clause  length  in  words, 

number of clause elements, amount of syntactic embedding and patterns in Hallidayan transitivity 

process-types. Given the nature of these lexicogrammatical features, the argument is made that 

Subject  ellipsis  across  consecutive  clauses  can  iconically  express  an  increase  in  pace  – 

something only observable when the text is viewed dynamically. 

 

Keywords:  Subject  ellipsis,  textual  pace,  textual  dynamism,  semantic  description, 

lexicogrammatical features 

 

 



Firth (1951: 123) famously remarked that linguistics is “language turned back on itself”, that linguistic 

methods “are neither immanent or transcendent” but rather simply assist the linguist in her/his making 

statements of meaning. This paper is concerned with using the dynamic qualities observed in authentic 

language text as a heuristic for semantic description – specifically, here, the semantic description of a 

particular lexicogrammatical phenomenon: ellipsis. It takes, as its case study, the claim that the ellipsis 

of the grammatical Subjects across consecutive clause may express pace by iconic means (see Clarke, 

forthcoming). The paper begins, §1, with a discussion of linguistic dynamism, starting with the Functional 

Sentence  Perspective  operationalisation  of  dynamism  as  a  matter  internal  to  the  clause  and  then 

broadening the scope of dynamism to a wider textual environment

 

(Danes, 1974; Matthiessen, 2002).  In 



§2, ellipsis, the phenomenon under predominant focus in the paper, is defined and an argument made 

for the need for further work on more delicate semantic accounts of the phenomenon. §3 constitutes the 

mainstay  of  the  paper.  There,  clauses  attesting  consecutive  Subject  ellipsis  in  a  corpus  of  football 

newspaper  reports  are  surveyed  for  their  lexicogrammatical  behaviour  in  respect  of  four  features:  (i) 

clause  length  in  words;  (ii)  number of  clause  elements;  (iii)  amount of  syntactic embedding;  and  (iv) 

transitivity. As the paper concludes, comparing the aforementioned features in those clauses implicated 

in the cases of consecutive Subject ellipsis with the clauses of the surrounding co-text suggests that 

ellipsis is used to convey pace – something only apparent when the analyst views the text dynamically.  

 

 

1. 



Clausal dynamism and textual dynamism 

 


In the Introduction to the present special issue, Clarke & Arus loosely use ‘linguistic dynamism’ to refer 

to a range of ways in which different parts of some attested use of language contribute varyingly in the 

production of meaning. One of the earlier and more extensive attempts to account for what we may term 

‘linguistic  dynamism’  resides  in  the  work  of  Firbas  (e.g.  1971;  1992)  and  colleagues  working  in  in 

Functional  Sentence  Perspective  (henceforth  FSP).  What  these  scholars  label  ‘communicative 

dynamism’ (henceforth CD) is taken to be “an inherent quality of communication [… the] development 

towards the attainment of a communicative goal […] the fulfilment of a communicative purpose” where 

“some elements are more or less dynamic”,  “differ[ing] in the extent to which they contribute to [that] 

further development of the communication” (Firbas, 1992: 7)

For scholars in FSP, dynamism is primarily 



a matter internal to the clause; “the distribution of degrees of CD [is] over the sentence” (Firbas, 1971: 

138) – these ‘more or less dynamic’ elements defined in terms of ‘theme’ (the lowest CD carrier) and 

‘rheme’ (the highest carrier of CD). Daneš (1974) extends FSP’s account of dynamism by considering 

how ‘theme’ patterns across  complete texts; if most often the consecutive themes refer to the same 

referent, there is ‘constant thematic progression’; if most often the rheme of one clause becomes the 

theme of the next, there is ‘simple linear thematic progression’; etc..  

 

While the starting point of Daneš (1974) ‘thematic progression’ is still an item defined in terms of its place 



within  the  clause,  in  ‘logogenesis’  Matthiessen  (2002)  proposes  a  notion  of  dynamism  which  is  yet 

broader still. Matthiessen (2002) defines ‘logogenesis’ as an approach to text analysis which aims to 

account for how the text unfolds as a process in the creation of meaning. As such, it is concerned with 

dynamism across entire and organic textual environments. Counter to viewing the text synoptically and 

being concerned with – say – the ratio of positive polarity to negative polarity clauses in the text as a 

whole, a logogenetic analysis is sensitive to relative ordering in the evolution of semiosis which leads to 

the production of text; in terms of the same example, do either negative polarity or positive polarity clauses 

cluster, or otherwise predominantly occur at a certain point in the text? Conceiving of linguistic dynamism 

in this way, it relevant to inquire about the instantiated trajectory throughout the course of the text for any 

linguistic phenomenon, whether defined by a particular level (phonological, lexicogrammatical, semantic, 

etc.) or not, by a particular unit (text phase, clause, phoneme, etc.) or not. Something akin to the notion 

of ‘logogenesis’ is what is intended by dynamism in the present paper. This take on dynamism is relevant 

given  that  the  phenomenon  under  study  in  this  paper  involves  relations  typically  enacted  across 

boundaries structurally greater than the clause complex (Halliday & Hasan, 1976). 

 

 

2. 



Towards developing the description of the semantics of ellipsis 

 

This paper demonstrates the potential of the type of linguistic dynamism discussed in the last section to 



serve as a heuristic in the practice of semantic description. It uses, as its case study, Clarke (forthcoming), 

which  is  concerned  with  ellipsis  –  particularly  the  meanings  expressed  by  ellipsis.  Ellipsis,  a 

lexicogrammatical phenomenon (Halliday & Hasan, 1976: 89-90; Quirk et al., 1985: 859), is defined here 

as  the  predictable  omission  of  one  or  more  usually  obligatory  elements  of  some  syntactic  unit  – 

‘predictable’ in that the elements in question can be retrieved from the co-text and can be specified in 

form precisely, pro-form and morphological variation aside (see Quirk et al., 1985: 884- 888 and Clarke, 

2012: 64-66). Working in a broadly Hallidayan paradigm (Halliday, 1978; 1985; 1993; Halliday & Hasan, 

1985),  Clarke  (forthcoming)  assumes  a  stratal  and  functional  conception  of  language  where  the 



descriptive job relative to a lexicogrammatical phenomenon such as ellipsis is not complete until due 

consideration is given to the meanings it expresses and by which it is motivated (Barthes, 1977: 87; 

Halliday, 1979; 1996).  

 

Only  two  such  semantic  accounts  of  ellipsis  have  so  far  been  presented  in  the  systemic  functional 



literature. Halliday & Hasan (1976: 306-308, 314-318) claim that ellipsis communicates 'continuity in the 

context of contrast'; that is, ellipsis conveys a local continuity (e.g. of referent, of process, etc.) where 

there is a broader environment of contrast (e.g. in terms of class membership, in terms of polarity or 

modality, etc.; see, for a more detailed discussion, Clarke, 2016b). However, so say Halliday and Hasan 

(1976: 306-308, 314-318), this is a generalised semantic motive for ellipsis – i.e. one common to all its 

uses. One-to-one grammar-meaning correspondences  are rare in a system as complex as  language 

(Givón, 1985). It is therefore very likely that more specific types and patterned uses of ellipsis will have 

their own different semantic motives for which a comprehensive description of ellipsis will also need to 

account.  

 

The same argument is made by Xueyan (2013). In order to develop the descriptive account of ellipsis, 



Xueyan  (2013:  239)  calls  for  text-type  specific  studies  of  ellipsis  –  its  patterns  of  use  and  meaning 

expressions in such text-types. She takes a step down this road by observing the use of ellipsis in textual 

data of a particular contextual type; namely, teacher-student interaction in EFL classroom discourse. 

However, in her data the only meaning she claims to be expressed by ellipsis is that which is expressed 

by instances of clausal ellipsis, which she shows are predominant in her data. These in her data, Xueyan 

claims,  coherently  tie  together  moves  in  the  sequencing  of  such  moves  in  dialogue.  As  a  semantic 

expression, this is as general as Halliday & Hasan’s (1976: 306-308, 314-318) posited 'continuity in the 

context of contrast' meaning sense of ellipsis. Clarke (forthcoming), then, is the only published specific 

semantic statement on uses of ellipsis typical in a particular text-type known to the present author. 

 

 



3. 

Consecutive Subject ellipsis and textual pace 

 

Clarke (forthcoming) argues that instances of consecutive Subject ellipsis such as those in the following 



example relay, as a part of their meaning, a swiftness of pace.   

 

(1) 



Craig Bellamy, whose contribution across the pitch was colossal, collected a Lescott interception, (Craig 

Bellamy [S]) ran 40 yards, (Craig Bellamy [S]) exchanged passes with Richards and (Craig Bellamy [S]) 

gratefully lashed in on 74 minutes.  

(Week 5, Independent

 

He uses, as his data, a 50,220 word corpus of eighty-nine newspaper reports on English Premier League 



football games played during 2009 and 2010 published on the websites of UK tabloid and UK broadsheet 

(for more details on the corpus, see Clarke, 2012;  forthcoming). This dataset contains thirty cases of 

Subject ellipsis where there is also ellipsis of the Subject of the immediately preceding or subsequent 

clause (or both) – these thirty clauses giving fourteen examples like (1), twelve with two neighbouring 

cases of Subject ellipsis and two with three neighbouring cases of Subject ellipsis (three more of these 

are presented in §3.1 – 3.4; see Appendix 1 in Clarke forthcoming for the remaining ten). Given the 



occurrence  of  any  type  of  ellipsis  in  this  corpus,  the  occurrence  of  this  particular  patterned  type  is 

statistically significant (p = 0.000189)

1



 



The fundamental purpose of this section, the mainstay of the paper, is to demonstrate how linguistic 

dynamism of the sort described in §1 can assist in semantic description. If semiotic expression is typically 

complex  such  that  meanings  are  often  construed  by  an  orchestration  of  multiple  lexicogrammatical 

features (see the last section), any features identified as being sensitive to variation across local text 

environments may well become method and evidence for semantic description and semantic dynamism 

respectively (cf. again Firth, 1951: 123). To what semantic generalisation do such features appear to 

point? Not only must such inquiry be necessarily empirical (Xueyan, 2013: 239); the identification of the 

relevant  lexicogrammatical  features  is,  I  here  argue,  facilitated  significantly  by  the  use  of  statistical 

computation. 

 

This section is arranged into four parts, corresponding to four lexicogrammatical characteristics which 



suggest a systematic difference in examples like (1) between, on the one hand, the consecutive clauses 

containing Subject ellipsis and the antecedent clause (referred to collectively as ‘the ellipsis clauses’ in 

the  following  discussion)  and,  on  the  other,  the  clauses  of  the  surrounding  co-text  –  a  difference 

seemingly motivated semantically so as to construe increased pace. First, §3.1 considers the difference 

between the aforementioned groups of clauses in terms, simply, of their word length. Next, §3.2 and §3.3 

look similarly at an assumed notion of ‘text-time’ but in more linguistically sophisticated terms  – as a 

matter of the number of elements per clause and then the amount of syntactic embedding per clause. 

Finally, §3.4 compares the ellipsis clauses with the clauses of the surrounding co-text in terms of patterns 

of transitivity, a different lexicogrammatical feature in type from those considered in the previous three 

sub-sections. 

 

 

3.1.  



Clause length in words 

 

Barthesian structuralists working on literary narrative (e.g. Barthes, 1966; Chatman, 1969; 1978; Genette, 



1980; etc.) considered how the text can itself construe time, i.e. iconically – a vehicle to vary, emphasise 

and otherwise make meaningful aspects of time. In terms of durative meanings, for example, Chatman 

(1978:  72)  labels  textual  ‘stretch’  instances  where  the  reported  actions  happen  in  a  short  real-world 

timeframe (the ‘story-time’) but are discussed at great length in the text (the ‘text-time’). Their approach 

can be criticised, most obviously owing to the page’s indelicacy as a unit of measure for the assumed 

‘text-time’ (see below this sub-section). Certainly, the page is better suited to the literary works with which 

those scholars were concerned; in the analyses of this paper, the page is an unsuitable measure, given 

the word length of texts in the football newspaper reports corpus introduced above is typically between 

                                                           

1

 With four thousand seven hundred and thirty two clauses in the corpus and two hundred and forty four instances of any type 



of ellipsis, the chance of any clause containing ellipsis is slightly greater than five per cent (244/4732 = 0.0516). The chance 

of two consecutive clauses both containing ellipsis is slightly greater than a quarter of 1% (0.0516 x (0.0516 / 4642) x 4643 = 

0.00264651).  While  of  course  semiotic  relations  are  not  random  (Oakes,  1998),  the  occurrence  of  fourteen  cases  of 

consecutive ellipsis, all of the same Subject ellipsis type, is a particularly marked occurrence.  

 


300 and 800 words long. In an analysis akin to that of the aforementioned scholars, then, this sub-section 

uses clause length in words as a more delicate measure of ‘text-time’

2



 



Let us take another prototypical example of consecutive Subject ellipsis from the data, including some of 

its surrounding co-text: 

 

(2) 


Keane is a player who thrives on confidence 

-3 


and did not allow that to knock his nerve. 

-2 


In the 18th 

minute, he got the ball rolling - the ball he would eventually take home after his superb display - when he 

scored from the spot in ebullient fashion. 

-1 


Jermain Defoe exposed Andre Bikey's lack of manoeuvrability 

by rolling him with ease, only to be brought down by the central defender's despairing challenge. 



Keane 

skipped up, 

2

 (Keane [S]) shimmied, 

3

 (Keane [S]) fooled keeper Brian Jensen into diving right 



and (Keane [S]) coolly slotted the ball into the other corner

+1 

Burnley are not a team to park the bus 



on their away travels, despite their obvious weakness at the back. 

+2 


And they do have a bit of flair going 

forward, which is why they have won all three of their Premier League home games so far. 

+3 

Manager 


Owen Coyle was convinced they should have been rewarded in the 26th minute when Steven Fletcher 

rammed the ball home after a clever Joey Gudjonsson flick. 

 

(Week 7, News of the World



 

The word length of both those clauses attesting the successive Subject-only ellipsis (introduced with 

2



3



 

and 


4

, and emboldened) and the antecedent clause in this example (introduced with 

1

 and emboldened) 



appear prima facie short (3, 1, 7 and 9 words). Comparing the average word length of all ‘the ellipsis 

clauses’ (8.56 words) with the same measure for all clauses in the football newspaper reports corpus 

(10.63 words) does not, however, reveal much in the way of difference. This is particularly true if one 

considers that the difference is at least influenced, if not fully accounted for, by the omission to words 

caused by the ellipsis itself (for a more detailed discussion, see Clarke, 2016b). Such  a comparison, 

however, misses the point; if the argument is that consecutive Subject ellipsis projects a quickening of 

the textual pace, relativity is paramount; quicker than what? The relevant contrast is not between those 

clauses implicated in the successive Subject ellipsis and all other clauses elsewhere in the corpus; it is 

far more local than that.  

 

The length of the three clauses prior to (introduced with 



-1

-2 



and 

-3

) and the three clauses immediately 



after (

+1



+2 

and 


+3 

) ‘the ellipsis clauses’ in text example (2) are significantly greater in word length (9, 29 

and 24;  20, 26 and 27 words) than those clauses involved in the ellipsis. This trend is general to all 

fourteen examples of the phenomenon in the corpus; there is a statistically significant difference between 

the average word length for clauses containing consecutive Subject ellipsis (again, 8.56 words) and the 

same for all clauses immediately before or after (16.40 words for the clauses in the pre-co-text; 16.51 

words for the post-co-text; see Appendix 2 in Clarke, forthcoming for more details). With a t-score of 

6.2916 and 125 degrees of freedom, the probability that these results are down to chance – rather than 

motivated by different underlying populations – is p <0.0005. 

 

Measuring ‘text-time’ by word count has revealed a systematic pattern such that those clauses involved 



in  consecutive  Subject  ellipsis  are  significantly  and  repeatedly  shorter  in  length  than  clauses  of  the 

                                                           

2

 No attempt is made here to account for ‘story-time’ – compare how long is a skipping up with how long is a shimming (see 



textual example (2)) – and so neither is any attempt made to compare an assumed ‘text-time’ with an assumed ‘story-time’. 

surrounding co-text. However, as hinted at above, this sort of analysis can still be criticised for being 

unsophisticated  from  a  linguistic  standpoint;  much  like  the  page,  the  word  carries  limited  linguistic 

regularity (Sinclair, 1991: 28-29, 41). For this reason, the next two sub-sections compare the ‘text-time’ 

of  ‘the  ellipsis  clauses’  and  the  clauses  of the  surrounding  co-text  by  means of a  more  linguistically 

rigorous analysis in terms of syntactic complexity: (i) by the number of clause elements, as a measure of 

syntactic complexity conceived as syntactic breadth (§3.2); and (ii) by the amount of syntactic embedding, 

as  a  measure  of  syntactic  complexity  conceived  as  syntactic  depth  (§3.3).  These  analyses  are 

complimentary halves of one ‘syntactic complexity’ whole; that is, the number of elements a clause has 

is likely to co-vary with the amount of syntactic embedding it attests. Their separation into two separate 

sub-sections aids presentation but is a division of an artificial kind, as per the process of analysis itself. 

 

 

3.2.  



Number of clause elements 

 

Evidence from a number of studies in psycholinguistic approaches relate syntactic complexity to cognitive 



processing and reading-time (e.g. Noordman & Vonk, 1994; cf. also Simpson, 2014). Processing-time 

generally and reading-time certainly bear some relation to the construal of time by iconic means (cf. the 

last section). Other things being equal, then, the fewer in number the elements in a clause, the quicker 

the implied text pace; by the same token, the greater the number of elements in a clause, the slower the 

implied pace of the text. Consider the following further example of the phenomenon under focus in this 

paper: 


 

(3) 


-3

 

Once he shrugged off his nearest marker he cantered, unchallenged, into the penalty area 



-2

 

and steered 



the ball into the far corner of the net. 

-1

 



The exuberant Ashley Cole, virtually playing as a winger, was next 

to take up the baton. 



He tamed a lofted pass, 



(he [S]) left a bewildered Lorik Cana on his backside, 



and (he [S]) poked in a fabulous goal. 

+1 


The outstretched foot of Marton Fulop prevented a fourth only 

temporarily

+2 

but  Frank  Lampard  capitalised  on  more  slack  marking  when  he  slid  in  Ashley  Cole's 



tantalising  cross. 

+3 


Anelka's  blistering  shot  suggested  that  whatever  Bruce  said  at  half-time  was 

insufficient to limit the damage. 

(Week 21, Guardian)

 

 



The three clauses implicated in consecutive Subject ellipsis, repeated below as (3ai) – (3aiii), contain, 

respectively, three, three and two clause elements following a functional interpretation of the syntax of 

the English clause akin, broadly, to a  Hallidayan (Halliday, 1961; 1967-8; 1994) cum Quirkian (Quirk et 

al., 1995; Biber et al., 1999) approach. Where it occasionally departs from standard Hallidayan (Halliday, 

1994)  model,  Fawcett’s  (2000;  2008)  systemic  functional  model  is  followed;  the  most  significant 

discrepancy  in  the  context  of  the  present  analysis  is  that  embedded  clauses  are  treated  as  direct 

elements of a matrix clause rather than as tactically related clauses subject to analysis in their own terms

3



 

(3a) 


(i) 

i

 He [S/ngp] 



ii

 tamed [MV] 

iii

 a lofted pass [C/ngp],  



                                                           

3

 Note that each new clause element is introduced with a superscript Roman numeral. Inside square brackets after each 



clause element are short-form labels to denote, firstly, the clause element in question (S = Subject; F = Finite; MV = Main 

Verb; C = Complement; A = Adjunct) and, secondly, separated by a forward slash, its realisation in form (Cl. = clause; ngp = 

nominal group; pgp = prepositional group; adjgp = adjectival group; advgp – adverb group).  


(ii) 

i

 left [MV] 



ii

 a bewildered Lorik Cana [C/ngp] 

iii

 on his backside [C/pgp],  



(iii)

 

and 



i

 poked in [MV] 

ii

 a fabulous goal [C/ngp].  



 

In comparison, the three clauses before those implicated in ellipsis, (3bi) – (3biii) below, have a greater 

number of clause elements – five, three, and four respectively: 

 

(3b) 



(i)

 



Once he shrugged off his nearest marker [A/Cl.] 

ii 


he [S/ngp] 

iii


 

cantered [MV], 

iv

 unchallenged [A/adjgp], 



v

 into the penalty area [A/pgp]  

(ii



and 



steered [MV] 

ii 

the ball [C/ngp] 



iii 

into the far corner of the net [A/pgp].  

(iii)

 

i



 The exuberant Ashley Cole [S/ngp], 

ii

 virtually playing as a winger [A/Cl.], 



iii

 was [MV] 

iv

 next to take 



up the baton [C/adjgp].  

 

The  three  clauses  after  ‘the  ellipsis  clauses’,  (3ci)  –  (3ciii),  also  contain  a  greater  number  of  clause 



elements with four, four and three respectively: 

 

(3c) 



(i)

 



The outstretched foot of Marton Fulop [S/ngp] 

ii 


prevented [MV] 

iii 


a fourth [C/ngp] 

iv 


only temporarily 

[A/advgp],  

(ii)

 

but 



Frank Lampard [S/ngp] 

ii 

capitalised on [MV] 



iii 

more slack marking [C/ngp] 

iv 

when he slid in Ashley 



Cole's tantalising cross [A/Cl.].  

(iii)


 

Anelka's  blistering  shot  [S/ngp] 



ii 

suggested  [MV] 

iii 

that  whatever  Bruce  said  at  half-time  was 



insufficient to limit the damage [C/Cl.]. 

 

This pattern – that the number of clause elements are fewer for ‘the ellipsis clauses’ than for the clauses 



of the surrounding co-text – is a trend general to all cases of consecutive Subject ellipsis in the football 

newspaper reports corpus. On average, clauses of the surrounding co-text have 4.46 clause elements, 

with, therein, clauses of the ‘pre-co-text’ having a slightly greater number of clause elements (4.58) than 

clauses of the ‘post-co-text’ (4.33). The average number of clause elements for those clauses involved 

in the cases of consecutive Subject ellipsis is fewer: 3.21. 

 

 



Although on first impression this difference appears to be minimal, the limits of working memory (Miller, 

1956) mean that there is a ceiling on the size of even any motivated difference where numbers of clause 

elements are concerned; rather, what is important here is that the difference between ‘the ellipsis clauses’ 

and  the  clauses  of  the  surrounding  co-text  is  systematic;  in  twelve  of  the  fourteen  instances  of 

consecutive  Subject  ellipsis  in  the  data,  there  are,  per  clause,  fewer  clause  elements  in  ‘the ellipsis 

clauses’ than there are for both the clauses of the ‘pre-’ and the ‘post-co-text’. Neither is it the case that 

this difference in the number of clause elements is accounted for by the  instances of Subject ellipsis 

contained within ‘the ellipsis clauses’. For one thing, the clauses of the surrounding co-text contain ten 

ellipted clause elements themselves (e.g. (3bii) above). In addition, the average difference, in terms of 

numbers of clause elements, between ‘the ellipsis clauses’ and those clauses of the surrounding co-text 

across all fourteen examples is in excess of 1 (4.46 – 3.21 = 1.25), and so cannot be explained by Subject 

ellipsis alone – even putting aside the not insignificant number of cases of ellipsis also in the clauses of 

the surrounding co-text. In sum of this sub-section, the clauses of the surrounding co-text appear more 

syntactically complex than ‘the ellipsis clauses’ in terms of the number of clause elements they contain. 

 


 

3.3.  

Amount of syntactic embedding 

 

Syntactic embedding was described at the end of §3.1 as the depth of syntactic complexity. Let us here 



elaborate this description a little. Taking a Hallidayan (1961; see also Fawcett, 2008: 72-82) approach to 

grammar, syntactic units – regularities in form – are said to be composed of functional elements – parts 

of the unit defined by the role each plays in that unit. Each general type of syntactic unit (in English: 

clause, phrase and word) has its own functional elements. The English clause has the elements: Subject, 

Finite, Main Verb, Complement

4

 and Adjunct. Owing to the richness of this area of English grammar, 



there are a number of different types, or ‘classes’, of English phrase (noun phrase, verb phrase, adjective 

phrase, adverb phrase and prepositional phrase), each with their own inventory of functional elements 

(see,  for  example,  Fawcett,  2000:  306-307).  As  often  noted,  present  day  English  does  little  of  its 

grammatical work morphologically; the number of functional elements needed to describe the syntactic 

unit  of  word  in  English  are  therefore  few  with  syntactic  embedding  here  rare.  A  case  of  syntactic 

embedding is said to occur, then, when an element of one syntactic unit has, as its form, a unit equal to 

or greater than itself on the rank-scale of syntactic units. By ‘rank scale’ is meant a hierarchy of units, 

bigger to smaller in typical size. In English, the rank-scale of syntactic units is: clause > phrase > word

5



typically, a clause is composed of a number of phrases, a phrase of a number of words. In relation to an 



English phrase,  for example,  syntactic  embedding happens  when  one of  its  elements  takes  either  a 

clause  or  another  phrase  as  its  form  (see  below  this  sub-section  for  examples).  One  caveat  needs 

imposing on this account of syntactic embedding. There are a small number of instances in English where 

syntactic embedding is an inevitable consequence of the grammatical environment, rather than being a 

free choice of the language user. Noun phrases which function as post-modifiers in prepositional phrases 

(e.g.  backside  in  on  his  backside  –  see  (3dii)  below)  would  constitute  just  such  a  grammatical 

environment. These and equivalent cases of what may be termed ‘obligatory’ syntactic embedding will 

not be included as instances of embedding in the analyses of this section. 

 

As was stressed at the end of §3.1, it is artificial to separate the discussions of the analyses of syntactic 



breadth and syntactic depth. To illustrate this point, compare (3ai) and (3ciii) from the last sub-section; 

both clauses have three clause elements, but one of these clauses is clearly more syntactically complex 

than the other (see below this sub-section) with that complexity furnished as syntactic depth, not breadth

.

 



As such, the analysis here of syntactic embedding considers the same example of consecutive Subject 

ellipsis as analysed for the number of clause elements in the last sub-section. In the analysis which 

follows, non-obligatory embedding of phrases within phrases is marked by enclosure of single square 

brackets (e.g. [fabulous] goal) with non-obligatory embedding of a clause within either another clause 

or a phrase being marked by double square brackets (e.g. next [[to take up the baton]]). Given the relation 

between syntactic complexity and cognitive-processing (see the start of the last sub-section), the more 

                                                           

4

 Many non-Hallidayan functional models (e.g. Quirk et al., 1985; Biber et al., 1999) distinguish those arguments, Subject 



aside, which are new to the clause (so-called Objects; e.g. the ball in He picked up the ball) and subsequent mentions to a 

referent already present in the clause (so-called Complements; e.g. a study in frustration in Van Persie's face was a study in 



frustration). 

 

5



 Where > denotes ‘is greater than’. 

infrequent syntactic embedding, the quicker for implications of text pace and vice-versa – other things 

being equal. 

 

(3d) 


(i) He tamed a 

i

[lofted] pass,  



(ii) left a 

i

[bewildered] Lorik Cana on his backside,  



(iii)

 

and poked in a 



i

[fabulous] goal.  

 

The three clauses implicated in consecutive Subject ellipsis, (3di) – (3diii), each have a single instance 



(a [lofted] passa [bewildered] Lorik Cana and a [fabulous] goal) of non-obligatory syntactic embedding 

– all unmodified adjective phrases functioning as pre-modifiers in a noun phrase. In comparison, the three 

clauses before those implicated in ellipsis, (3ei) – (3eiii), have three, two and three instances of syntactic 

embedding respectively: 

 

(3e) 


(i)

 

i



[[Once he shrugged off his 

ii

[nearest] marker]] he cantered, unchallenged, into the 



iii

 [penalty

area 

(ii


and steered the ball

 

into the [far] corner [of the net].  



(iii)

 

The 



i

[exuberant] Ashley Cole, 

ii

[[virtually playing as a winger]], was next 



iii

[[to take up the 

baton]].  

 

Likewise, for the three clauses following ‘the ellipsis clauses’, (3fi) – (3fiii), there are three, four and four 



instances of syntactic embedding: 

 

(3f) 



(i) The 

i

[outstretched] foot 



ii

[of Marton Fulop]

 

prevented



 

a fourth 

iii

[only] temporarily,  



(ii)

 

but



 

Frank Lampard capitalised on

 i

[more 


ii

[slack]] marking 

iii

[[when he slid in Ashley Cole's 



iv

[tantalising] cross]].  

(iii)

 

Anelka's 



i

[blistering]  shot  suggested 

ii

[[that 


iii

[[whatever  Bruce  said  at  half-time]]  was 

insufficient 

iv

[[to limit the damage]] ]]. 



 

This pattern – that there is notably less syntactic embedding in ‘the ellipsis clauses’ than in the clauses 

of the surrounding co-text – is common of all fourteen cases of the phenomenon under discussion. The 

average clause of the surrounding co-text has 4.26 cases of syntactic embedding. At 1.42 incidences of 

syntactic embedding, the average clause involved in the cases of consecutive Subject ellipsis has far 

less syntactic embedding.

 

 

As has been shown over the course of the analyses provided in the last two sub-sections, then, the 



analysis of syntactic breadth, as a matter of the number of clause elements, and the syntactic depth, as 

the amount of syntactic embedding, has revealed results which support the main finding of §3.1; that, 

namely, clauses involved in cases of consecutive Subject ellipsis behave markedly and systematically 

different to clauses of their surrounding co-text. However, the analyses of this sub-section and the last 

are more linguistically sophisticated than the relatively simple clause length in words analysis of §3.1.  

 

 



3.4.  

Patterns in transitivity 

 


A  comparison  of  ‘the  ellipsis  clauses’  with  those  clauses  of  the  surrounding  co-text  for  the  dynamic 

occurrence  of  a  final  lexicogrammatical  feature  provides  yet  further  evidence  for  the  claim  that 

consecutive Subject ellipsis in this data is motivated by the semantics of a quickening of the textual pace. 

This analytical comparison is different in kind from those so far discussed in earlier parts of §3. Consider 

a third extended textual example from the data: 

 

(4) 



-3 

At that point, there seemed to be only one winner. 

-2 

How wrong those doubters were as Ferguson's 



team surged back, Giggs the architect behind the comeback just as Arshavin had sparked Arsenal earlier. 

-1 


The difference was referee Mike Dean said yes when United claimed their penalty as Rooney went 

crashing to the ground after Giggs had supplied the pass that sent him through one-on-on with Almunia. 



Rooney went straight for the ball, 



(Rooney [S]) put it on the spot 



and (Rooney [S]) promptly 

sent Almunia the wrong way. 

+1 


When Diaby was hacked at by Rooney and Wes Brown, both men were 

booked 


+2 

and Van Persie was offered the chance to curl a free-kick at Foster's goal which thudded against 

the  crossbar. 

+3 


A  minute  later,  from  a  very  similar  position,  United  got  their  second  when  Diaby 

inexplicably headed into his own net.

 

(Week 4, Daily Star



 

In this example, the two clauses containing the successive Subject ellipses (introduced with 

2

 and 


3

, and 


emboldened) and the antecedent clause (introduced with 

1

 and emboldened) have dynamic main verbs 



(went forput and sent). These are verbs of material transitivity in Halliday’s (1967-8; 1994) terms – verbs 

denoting experiences observable to an on-looker as they are manifest outwardly of the body (cf. cognitive 

experiences, thinkingfeeling, etc.). The main verbs which follow ‘the ellipsis clauses’ in this example 

(introduced with 

+1

 , 


+2

 and 


+3

bookedoffered and got) are also all material process-types. However, the 

main verbs of those clauses preceding ‘the ellipsis clauses’ is very different, comprised of stative rather 

than dynamic verbs: in terms of Halliday’s transitivity categories, seemed to be (introduced with 

-3

) is 


existential; were (introduced with 

-2

) is an attributive type of relational; and was (introduced with 



-1

) is an 


identifying type of relational. An inversion of this pattern is seen in example (2) in §3.1 above: the main 

verbs of ‘the ellipsis clauses’ (skipped up, shimmiedfooled and slotted) along with those preceding ‘the 

ellipsis clauses’ (allowgot … rolling and exposed) are material in transitivity, but the clauses subsequent 

to ‘the ellipsis clauses’ have a different transitivity profile: are is an attributive type of relational; have is a 

possessive type of relational; and convinced is mental. This pattern is common to all fourteen cases of 

consecutive Subject ellipsis and their surrounding clauses found in the football newspaper reports corpus. 

That is, the vast majority of clauses implicated in consecutive Subject ellipsis (79.55%) have material 

transitivity. While there are still a predominant number of instances of material transitivity in the clauses 

of both the prior (54.76%) and post co-text (56.10%), this is less frequent than the occurrence of material 

transitivity in ‘the ellipsis clauses’. Clauses of the prior and post co-text also share a significant frequency 

of relational transitivity (28.57% in the prior co-text; 31.71% in the post co-text) and so behave remarkably 

similarly in terms of their transitivity just as is the case in terms of their word length (see §3.1 above). 

 

 

4.  



Conclusion  

 

The analytical trends presented in §3.1 – §3.4 establish a marked difference between, on the one hand, 



those clauses involved in cases of consecutive Subject ellipsis in the football newspaper reports corpus 

and,  on  the  other,  the  clauses  of  their  surrounding  co-text  –  doing  so  in  terms  of  the  four 



lexicogrammatical features there discussed. ‘The ellipsis clauses’ are shorter (§3.1), syntactically simpler 

in having few clause elements (§3.2) and less syntactic embedding (§3.3), and are to a larger degree 

material in their transitivity (§3.4). Indeed, it should be noted that these patterns are in all likelihood yet 

more pointed; the decision to take always and exactly three clauses of the surrounding ‘pre-’ and ‘post-

co-text’ against which to compare ‘the ellipsis clauses’ is arbitrary, designed to facilitate the analysis; 

these evidently  will  not  be coterminous  with  organic  rhetorical  divisions  of  text  and  context  (see,  for 

example, Cloran, 1994; Gregory, 2002; etc.) where changes of temporal kinds, including pace, would be 

more naturally located. Regardless, these lexicogrammatical features do appear in a patterned way as 

just outlined. Moreover, in slightly different ways they have in common an ability to express time, whether 

most obviously by iconic (§3.1 – §3.3) or denotational means (§3.4). For this reason, Clarke (forthcoming) 

claims that Subject ellipsis over consecutive clauses is motivated semantically by an intention to express 

a quickening of the textual pace. Given that a chief aspect of the social action of football newspaper 

reports  is  discussion  of  on-field  events,  this  semantic  reasoning  appears  to  make  good  sense  and 

perhaps explains the statistically significant frequency with which the phenomenon occurs in this data 

(see  the  introduction  of  §3).  Greater  support  for  the  semantic  sense  of  ellipsis  discussed  in  Clarke 

(forthcoming)  would,  then, come  from observing  similar  patterns  of  use  of  ellipsis  in  other  text-types 

whose social action has experiential events associated with a range of paces, including fast ones. Further 

empirical work to this end is required. This paper’s particular focus, though, has been a matter of how 

qualitative-in-kind, textual analyses which are sensitive to dynamism across local textual environments 

can, when combined with statistical inquiry, function as a descriptively powerful method for the linguist 

interested in making statements of meaning – an example of Firth’s (1951: 123) famous dictum.  

 

 



References 

 

Barthes, R. (1966). ‘Introduction à l’analyse structurale des récits’. Communications, 8, 1-27. 



 

Biber, D., Johansson, S., Leech, G.N., Conrad, S., & Finnigan. E. (1999). Longman Grammar of Spoken 



and Written English. London: Longman. 

 

Chatman, S. (1969). ‘New ways of analysing narrative structure’. Language and Style, 2, 3-36. 



 

Chatman,  S.  (1978)  Story and  Discourse:  Narrative Structure  in  Fiction  and  Film.  Ithaca,  New York: 

Cornell University Press. 

 

Clarke,  B.P.  (2012). Do  patterns  of  ellipsis  in  text  support  systemic  functional  linguistics’  ‘context-



metafunction hook-up’ hypothesis? A corpus-based approach.  PhD thesis, Cardiff University, Cardiff. 

 

Clarke,  B.P.  (2016b) ‘Cohesion  in  Systemic  Functional  Linguistics  in  the  21



st

  century:  A  theoretical 

reflection’. In Bartlett, T & O’Grady G. (eds.) The Routledge Handbook of Systemic Functional Linguistics. 

Oxford: Routledge. 

 

Clarke,  B.P.  (forthcoming)  ‘Further  semantics  of  ellipsis:  The  increased  textual  pace  construed  by 



consecutive Subject ellipsis’. Offered to Word

 

Cloran, C. (1994). Rhetorical Units and Decontextualisation: An Enquiry into some Relations of Context, 



Meaning and Grammar. Nottingham: Monographs in Systemic Linguistics. 

 

Daneš, F.  (1974). ‘Functional Sentence Perspective and the organisation of the text’. In Daneš (ed.) 



Papers on Functional Sentence Perspective. The Hague: Mouton. 

 

Fawcett,  R.P.  (2000).  A  Theory  of  Syntax  for  Systemic  Functional  Linguistics.  Amsterdam:  John 



Benjamins.  

 

Fawcett,  R.P.  (2008).  Invitation  to  Systemic  Functional  Linguistics  through  the  Cardiff  Grammar:  An 



Extension and Simplification of Halliday's Systemic Functional Grammar. 3

rd

 edition. London: Equinox.  



 

Firbas, J. (1971) ‘On the concept of Communicative Dynamism in the theory of Functional Sentence 

Perspective’. In Sbornik prací filosofické fakulti brnenské universit,19/71, 135-144. 

 

Firbaš, J. (1992). Functional Sentence Perspective in Written and Spoken Communication. Cambridge: 



Cambridge University Press. 

 

Firth, J.R. (1951). ‘Modes of meaning’, Essays and Studies of the English Association, 4, 123-149. 



 

Genette, G. (1980). Narrative Discourse. Oxford: Blackwell.  

  

Givón, T. (1985). ‘Iconicity, isomorphism and non-arbitrary coding in syntax.’ In Haiman, J. (ed.) Iconicity 



in Syntax. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 187-219. 

 

Gregory, M.J. (2002) ‘Phasal analysis within communication linguistics: Two contrastive discourses’. In 



Fries, P., M. Cummings, D. Lockwood & W. Spruiell (eds.) Relations and Functions within and around 

Language. London: Continuum, 316-345. 

 

Halliday, M.A.K. (1961). ‘Categories of the theory of grammar’. Word, 17, 241-292.   



 

Halliday, M.A.K. (1967-8). 'Notes on transitivity and theme in English, Parts 1-3'. In Journal of 



Linguistics, 3 (1), 37-81, 3 (2), 199-244 and 4 (2), 179-215. 

 

Halliday,  M.A.K.  (1978).  Language  as  Social  Semiotic:  The  Social  Interpretation  of  Language  and 



Meaning. London: Arnold. 

 

Halliday, M.A.K. (1979). 'Modes of meaning and modes of expression: Types of grammatical structure, 



and their determination by different semantic functions'. In Allerton, D.J., E. Carney & D. Holdcroft (eds.) 

Function  and  Context  in  Linguistic  Analysis:  Essays  Offered  to  William  Haas.  London:  Cambridge 

University Press, 57-79.  

 

Halliday,  M.A.K.  (1985).  ‘Systemic  background’.  In  Benson,  J.D.  &  W.S.  Greaves  (eds.)  Systemic 



Perspectives on Discourse. Norwood, New Jersey: Ablex, 1-15. 

 

Halliday,  M.A.K.  (1993).  ‘Systemic  theory’.  In  Asher,  R.E.  (ed.)  The  Encyclopedia  of  Language  and 



Linguistics. Oxford: Pergamon Press, 4505-4508. 

 

Halliday, M.A.K. (1994). An Introduction to Functional Grammar. 2



nd

 edition. London: Arnold. 

 

Halliday,  M.A.K.  (1996).  ‘On  grammar  and  grammatics’.  In  Hasan,  R.,  C.  Cloran  &  D.G.  Butt  (eds.) 



Functional Descriptions: Theory in Practice. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1-38. 

 

Halliday, M.A.K. & Hasan, R. (1976). Cohesion in English. London: Longman. 



 

Halliday, M.A.K. & Hasan, R. (1985).  Language, Context and Text:  Aspects of Language in a Social 



Semiotic Perspective. Oxford

: University Press. 

 

Matthiessen,  C.M.I.M.    (2002).  ‘Lexicogrammar  in  discourse  development:  Logogenetic  patterns  of 



wording.’  In Huang, G.  &  Wang, Z. (eds.) Discourse  and  Language  Functions. Shanghai: Foreign 

Language Teaching and Research Press, 2-25. 

 

Noordman, L & Vonk, W. (1994). ‘Text processing and its relevance for literacy’. In Verhoeven, L (ed.) 



Functional Literacy: Theoretical Issues and Educational Implications. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 75-

92. 


 

Oakes, M. (1998). Statistics for Corpus Linguistics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 

 

Quirk, R., Greenbaum, S., Leech, G. & Svartvik, J. (1985). A Comprehensive Grammar of the English 



Language. Harlow: Longman. 

 

Simpson, P. (2014). ‘Just what is narrative urgency?’ Language and Literature, 23: 1, 3–22. 



 

Sinclair, J. (1991). Corpus, Concordance, Collocation. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 



 

Xueyan, Y. (2013). ‘Modelling ellipsis in EFL classroom discourse’. In Yan, F.  & Webster, J.J. (eds.) 



Developing Systemic Functional Linguistics: Theory and Application. Sheffield: Equinox, 227-240.

  


Yüklə 298,05 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə