Syddansk Universitet Integration of market pull and technology push in the corporate front end and innovation management Insights from the German software industry



Yüklə 316,83 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix04.05.2017
ölçüsü316,83 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

Syddansk Universitet

Integration of market pull and technology push in the corporate front end and

innovation management - Insights from the German software industry

Brem, Alexander; Voigt, K.-I.



Published in:

Technovation



Publication date:

2009


Document version

Publisher's PDF, also known as Version of record



Citation for pulished version (APA):

Brem, A., & Voigt, K-I. (2009). Integration of market pull and technology push in the corporate front end and

innovation management - Insights from the German software industry. Technovation, 29(5), 351-367.

General rights

Copyright and moral rights for the publications made accessible in the public portal are retained by the authors and/or other copyright owners

and it is a condition of accessing publications that users recognise and abide by the legal requirements associated with these rights.

            • Users may download and print one copy of any publication from the public portal for the purpose of private study or research.

            • You may not further distribute the material or use it for any profit-making activity or commercial gain

            • You may freely distribute the URL identifying the publication in the public portal ?



Take down policy

If you believe that this document breaches copyright please contact us providing details, and we will remove access to the work immediately

and investigate your claim.

Download date: 03. May. 2017



Author's personal copy

Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367

Integration of market pull and technology push in the corporate

front end and innovation management—Insights from the

German software industry

Alexander Brem

Ã

, Kai-Ingo Voigt



Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Industrial Management, Lange Gasse 20, 90403 Nuremberg, Germany

Abstract


Within the framework of this paper, an extensive literature overview of technology and innovation management aspects on market pull

and technology push will be given. The existing classification of market pull and technology push will be particularly shown and called

into question by suggesting a conceptual framework. Additionally, the most common front end innovation models will be introduced.

Finally, the authors will introduce how a technology-based service company is managing the connection of these two alternatives.

A special focus will be laid on the accordant methods in order to search for current market needs and new related technologies. The

selected case study will focus on one of Germany’s biggest and most successful software development and information technology service

providers. Based on interviews, document analysis, and practical applications, an advanced conceptual framework will be introduced as

to how market pull and technology push activities within the corporate technology and innovation management can be integrated.

Hence, the purpose of the paper is to introduce a theory-based conceptual framework that can be used in today’s corporate environment.

In this context, technology managers may use the results as a conceptual mirror, especially regarding the influencing factors of

innovation impulses and the use of interdisciplinary teams (with people from inside and outside the company) to accomplish successful

corporate technology and innovation management.

r

2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.



Keywords: Idea management; Front end; Innovation management; Technology management; Innovation process; Market pull; Technology push;

Software industry

1. Introduction and purpose

Organizations and businesses have recognized the need

for finding new methods and paradigms to efficiently serve

existing and new markets with new and/or modified

products as well as services (

Ansoff, 1965

). Thus, the

changing global environment is compelling organizations

and businesses to permanently seek the most efficient

models to maximize their innovation management efforts

(

Christiansen, 2000



). As innovation is a responsibility of all

business units and departments, their involvement needs to

be determined accordingly (

Tucker, 2002

). In this context,

an organization’s ability to identify, acquire, and utilize

(external) ideas can be seen as a critical factor in regards to

its market success (

Zahra and George, 2002

). This so-called

‘Front-End of Innovation’ is therefore one of the most

important areas of corporate management.

Technology and technology-oriented companies, espe-

cially in the business-to-business area, are traditionally

more influenced by new technologies than other compa-

nies. However, firms in the business-to-consumer sector

focus more on end-users, and, therefore, market-induced

impulses. The related scientific discussion regarding the

‘right’ innovation management and especially the ‘best’

source of innovation is similar to the question of whether

the chicken or egg came first. The question becomes even

more complex since there are several examples of successful

technology-oriented companies as well as market-oriented

ones. Therefore, the question is not which view is right or

wrong, but if there is a practicable way to combine both

views or even extend them to other related factors.

ARTICLE IN PRESS

www.elsevier.com/locate/technovation

0166-4972/$ - see front matter r 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

doi:


10.1016/j.technovation.2008.06.003

ÃCorresponding author. Tel.: +49 911 5302 235; fax: +49 911 5302 238.

E-mail address:

brem@industriebetriebslehre.de (A. Brem).



Author's personal copy

Hence, the purpose of the paper is to introduce a theory-

based conceptual framework that can be used in today’s

corporate environment. In order to achieve this, the related

theoretical background (with a focus on the front end of

innovation) is discussed, supplemented by a case study

from the German software industry. Finally, the discussion

and implication section summarizes and consolidates the

findings of both parts with the introduction of



different case-specific sources for innovation impulses,





an extended conceptual framework for corporate

innovation management and



an advanced front-end innovation approach.



2. Theoretical background and literature review

2.1. Conceptual classifications

In order to build a common understanding of market

pull and technology push activities, some fundamental

considerations will be introduced.

Dealing with technology means to handle different

stages of research and therefore special management duties

and responsibilities (see

Fig. 1

).

According to



Specht (2002)

, the stages of technology

development and pre-development activities belong to

technology management. The field of R&D management

is determined by adding upstream fundamental research as

well as product and process development. Finally, innova-

tion management includes the product and market

introduction phase. Thus, innovation management can be

defined as ‘a systematic planning and controlling process,

which includes all activities to develop and introduce new

products and processes for the company’ (

Seibert, 1998,

p. 127

) or, in short, the dispositive constitution of



innovation processes (

Hauschildt, 2004

). Following

Thom


(1980)

, these innovation processes can be divided into the

stages of ‘idea generation’, ‘idea acceptance’, and ‘idea

realization’ (see

Fig. 2

).

Obviously, every innovation is based on an idea from



inside or outside the company (

Boeddrich, 2004

). In order

to obtain a maximum number of innovative product and

process ideas, a holistic view of the innovation process is

needed. Hence, the basic approach of

Thom (1980)

is to


collect as many promising ideas as possible; therefore, the

determinations of the search fields are especially crucial to

the whole innovation process. Search fields can be

identified, for instance, by defining the individual user

needs and the current product value (

Burgelman et al.,

2004

). The idea acceptance phase consists of several stages



through which the ideas have to pass and where they are

enriched (

Cooper, 2005

). When realizing the selected ideas,

it is important to choose efficient ways of saving resources

(

Aeberhard and Schreier, 2001



). The final success of idea

management strongly depends on the right process

structure for the different kinds of ideas and the

corresponding adequate organizational implementation

(

Voigt and Brem, 2005



).

2.1.1. Fuzzy front end of innovation

For further consideration of the matter, the under-

standing of the front end of innovation (FEI) plays an

important role. Therefore, FEI will be defined and some

recent approaches will be introduced.

ARTICLE IN PRESS

                 

Prototype

Theory


Invention

Fundamental

research

Technology

development

Pre-

development

activities

Product

and

process-

development

Product

and

market-

introduction

Technology management

R&D management

Innovation management

Innovation

Technology 

Fig. 1. Classification of technology, R&D and innovation management (

Specht, 2002

).

Idea generation

Determine search field

Suggest ideas

Find ideas

Idea acceptance

Decide to realize a plan

Test and rate ideas

Create realization plans



Idea realization

Control acceptance

Realizing the new idea

Sell new idea to addressee

Fig. 2. Standardized stages of the corporate innovation process (

Thom,


1980

).

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367



352

Author's personal copy

The term ‘(fuzzy) front end’ describes the earliest stage of

an idea’s development and comprises the entire time spent

on the idea, as well as activities focusing on strengthening

it, prior to a first official discussion of the idea (

Reid and de

Brentani, 2004

). Wellsprings for ideas have both internal

and external sources (

von Hippel, 1988

). In this context, it

is important to consider the differences of the new product

and process development (see

Table 1


).

Furthermore, the terms ‘(fuzzy) front end’ and ‘front end

innovation’ are synonymous. Following the argumentation

of

Koen et al. (2001)



that this fuzziness implies an

innovation process phase consisting of unknowable and

uncontrollable factors, the term ‘front end innovation’ will

be the sole one used in this paper. In this sense, the phase is

partly analog to the introduced idea generation stage, but

the focus on the front end is mainly one of opportunity

identification and analysis (

Belliveau et al., 2004

;

Khurana


and Rosenthal, 2002

). Therefore, the front end is one of the

greatest areas of weakness of the innovation process and

fundamentally determines the later innovation success

(

Koen et al., 2001



). It will come as no surprise, then, that

effective management of the front end results is a

sustainable competitive (innovation) advantage. Surpris-

ingly, there has been little research done on the issue thus

far (

Kim and Wilemon, 2002



).

A flow-oriented approach, the so-called ‘idea tunnel’,

which resulted from an older concept called ‘development

funnel’ (

Hayes et al., 1988

), is the elementary basic model

for front end considerations (see

Fig. 3


).

Hence, there are two ways of gaining ideas: one,

collecting them in a sense that they are already present

somehow (at least in the mind of a person or group), or

two, generating them through a well thought-out process

utilizing creative methods. Consequently, creative practice

methods and techniques are needed to foster a continuous

spirit of creative evolution (

Kelley and Littman, 2005

). Key


elements for promoting corporate creativity include a

motivating reward system, officially recognized creativity

initiatives, the encouragement of self-initiated activities,

and the allowance of redundancy (

Stenmark, 2000

).

Nevertheless, several general requirements must be



fulfilled in order to generate ideas that will be successful

in the marketplace (

Boeddrich, 2004

):





a consideration of the company’s corporate strategy,



obvious benefits for the ideas’ target audience and





a systematically structured and conducted concept-

identification phase.

Moreover, there are not only general, but also company-

specific ramifications to consider, which increase the

ARTICLE IN PRESS

Table 1

Front end innovation vs. new product and process development (



Koen et

al., 2001

)

Front end of



innovation

New product and

process development

Nature of work

Experimental, often

chaotic, difficult to

plan, ‘eureka’

moments


Structured,

disciplined, and goal-

oriented with a project

plan


Commercialization

date


Unpredictable

Definable


Funding

Variable; in the

beginning phase, many

projects may be

‘bootlegged’, while

others will need

funding to proceed

Budgeted


Revenue

expectations

Often uncertain,

sometimes done with a

great deal of

speculation

Believable and with

increasing certainty,

analysis, and

documentation as the

release date gets closer

Activity


Both individual and

team-oriented in areas

to minimize risk and

optimize potential

Multi-functional

product and/or

process development

teams


collect

create

refine


evaluate

document


view

evaluate


ideas selected for 

confirmation and 

temporary programs

rejected ideas

ideas put back

ideas put back

new findings

check


Idea

Idea

view


rate

enrich


Idea

Idea

Idea

Idea

Idea

rejected ideas

ideas put back

ideas put back



Idea

Fig. 3. The idea tunnel (

Deschamps et al., 1995

).

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367



353

Author's personal copy

situation’s complexity (

Boeddrich, 2004

). That is why there

is always a dilemma between giving the front end a certain

system and structure on one hand, and forcing creativity

(as well as implementing externals) on the other hand.

Due to page restrictions, the following list of FEI models

is not exhaustive, but gives an overview of existing

approaches with different focuses.

The most popular one is the new concept development

model from

Koen et al. (2001)

, which is supposed

to provide a common language for front end activities

(see


Fig. 4

).

The circular shape shows the flow, circulation, and



iteration of ideas within the five core elements and

surrounding (external) influencing factors. A fundamental

distinction is made between an opportunity and an idea:

thus, opportunity identification and analysis precede a

(business) idea because these stages include an ongoing

process of several information enrichment stages, such as

market studies or scientific experiments. Finally, a formal

business plan or project proposal indicates the changeover

to the new product and process development.

A proposal for a more process-oriented procedure is

given by

Boeddrich (2004)

(see

Fig. 5


).

In this framework, there is a specific differentiation

between single process steps on one hand and organiza-

tional responsibilities on the other hand. Boeddrich

identified company-specific preconditions for the successful

management of front end activities, which were confirmed

by several other studies (

Boeddrich, 2004

):



definition of company-specific idea categories,





commitment to company-specific evaluation methods

and selection criteria, especially with regard to K.O.

criteria for approved projects,



commitment to the owner of the idea management



process,



commitment to individuals or organizational units that



promote innovation within the company,



definition of creative scopes for the company,





influence of the top management,



number of stages and gates in the tailor-made idea



management and



investigation of stakeholders in the structured front end



and establishment of their participation.

In a recent approach,

Sandmeier et al. (2004)

defined a


very comprehensive process model and went explicitly into

the topic of market pull vs. technology push (see

Fig. 6

).

Phase 1 focuses on the market and technology oppor-



tunities of a company. The central and iterative activities

are the strategies and goals of an innovation. Finally, there

are one to two opportunities and search fields for the next

stage. The following phase deals with the actual idea

generation and evaluation, including several sub-processes

ARTICLE IN PRESS



ENGINE

Idea

genesis 

Opportunity

analysis

Opportunity

identification 

Concept & 

technology 

development 

Idea

selection 

To NPPD

Fig. 4. New concept development model (

Koen et al., 2001

).

Multi-project-



management

Allocation of 

R&D-budget

Verification of 

estimations

Cross-functional teams reach 

decisions on ideas based on 

estimation

(product, technical, financial, 

and market attractiveness)

Strategic 

analysis of 

ideas 

by idea or 



innovation

manager


Development of 

innovation-

guidelines 

by top 


management 

and innovation 

manager

Portfolio of 



innovation 

projects


D

E

C

I

S

I

O

N

Preliminary 

projects

Idea screening

execution and further 

conceptual development

Idea gener-

ationand 

adoption

Strategic 

guidelines for 

innovations



Idea management, concept finding phase, 

predevelopment phase

Project 

management

Fig. 5. Front end model proposal (

Boeddrich, 2004

).

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367



354

Author's personal copy

in order to result in the creation of balanced business and

product cards. The final phase transfers the generated ideas

into business plans and product concepts, which will be

devolved to the product development phase. Moreover,

role-specific responsibilities are assigned, depending on the

innovation development progress.

It can be deduced that the described models vary in

terms of perception, resource considerations, and detailing.

What they have in common is that they are all based on

case studies and not on quantitative research. Hence, even

across a range of different companies, industries, and

strategies of product and process development, the front

end innovation challenges and threats seem to be very

similar. There continues a need for additional inter-branch-

based research for further consideration.

Considering the above background, this paper makes a

synthesis of recent literature and evaluates the synthesis in

light of what is learned through the case study to see

whether sector and/or branch specific-approaches are

needed.

2.1.2. Market pull vs. technology push



Generally, there are two common ways innovation

impulses differ (

Boehme, 1986

;

Brockhoff, 1969



;

Bullinger,

1994

;

Schoen, 1967



):

(i) Market pull/demand pull/need pull: The innovations’

source is a currently inadequate satisfaction of customer

needs, which results in new demands for problem-solving

(‘invent-to-order’ a product for a certain need). The impulse

comes from individuals or groups who (are willing to)

articulate their subjective demands.

(ii) Technology push: The stimulus for new products and

processes comes from (internal or external) research; the

goal is to make commercial use of new know-how. The

impulse is caused by the application push of a technical

capability. Therefore, it does not matter if a certain

demand already exists or not. In this context,

Gerpott


(2005)

makes a difference between high and low ‘newness’

of the innovation and thus between radical innova-

tions (‘technology push’) and incremental innovations

(‘market pull’) (see

Table 2


).

Therefore, technology push can be characterized as

creative/destructive,

with


new/major

improvements;

market pull, however, is a replacement or substitute

(

Walsh et al., 2002



). Another view comes from

Abernathy

and Utterback (1978)

, stating that radical product and

process innovation is subsequently followed by incremental

innovations. This is in accordance with

Pavitt (1984)

who


states that technology is particularly relevant for the early

stages of the product life cycle, and market factors

especially for their further diffusion.

A sole focus on technology push can lead to the so-called

‘lab in the woods approach’, where the R&D department is

organizationally and regionally undocked from the rest of

the corporation, working without any daily routine on

technological developments. This approach often results in

‘reinventions of the wheel’ and, consequently, ineffective

research. A strong concentration on market pull tends to

ARTICLE IN PRESS

Analysis of future needs 

and requirements



Yüklə 316,83 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə