Ranslational and



Yüklə 0,77 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix04.01.2017
ölçüsü0,77 Mb.
#4445
  1   2   3

T

RANSLATIONAL AND

C

LINICAL


R

ESEARCH


Human Alternatives to Fetal Bovine Serum for the Expansion of

Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Bone Marrow

K

AREN


B

IEBACK


,

a

A



NDREA

H

ECKER



,

a

A



SLI

K

OCAO



¨ MER

,

a



H

EINRICH


L

ANNERT


,

b

K



ATHARINA

S

CHALLMOSER



,

c,d


D

IRK


S

TRUNK


,

c,e


H

ARALD


K

LU

¨ TER



a

a

Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service of Baden-Wu¨rttemberg-



Hessen, Faculty of Clinical Medicine Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany;

b

Department



Hematology, Oncology and Rheumatology, Medical Clinic of the University Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany;

c

Stem Cell Research Unit Graz, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria;



d

University Clinic of Blood Group

Serology and Transfusion Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria;

e

University Clinic of Internal



Medicine, Department of Hematology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

Key Words. Mesenchymal stromal cells

Fetal bovine serum



Platelet-derived factors

Pooled platelet lysate



Human serum

Bone


marrow

A

BSTRACT



Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candi-

dates for novel cell therapeutic applications. For clinical

scale manufacturing, human factors from serum or plate-

lets have been suggested as alternatives to fetal bovine se-

rum (FBS). We have previously shown that pooled human

serum (HS) and thrombin-activated platelet releasate in

plasma (tPRP) support the expansion of adipose tissue-

derived MSCs. Contradictory results with bone marrow

(BM)-derived MSCs have initiated a comprehensive com-

parison of HS, tPRP, and pooled human platelet lysate

(pHPL) and FBS in terms of their impact on MSC isola-

tion, expansion, differentiation, and immunomodulatory

activity. In addition to conventional Ficoll density gradient

centrifugation, depletion of lineage marker expressing cells

(RosetteSep) and CD271

1

sorting were used for BM-MSC



enrichment. Cells were cultured in medium containing ei-

ther 10% FBS, HS, tPRP, or pHPL. Colony-forming units

and cumulative population doublings were determined,

and MSCs were maximally expanded. Although both HS

and tPRP comparable to FBS supported isolation and

expansion, pHPL significantly accelerated BM-MSC prolif-

eration to yield clinically relevant numbers within the first

two passages. MSC quality and functionality including cell

surface marker expression, adipogenic and osteogenic dif-

ferentiation, and immunosuppressive action were similar

in MSCs from all culture conditions. Importantly, sponta-

neous cell transformation was not observed in any of the

culture conditions. Telomerase activity was not detected in

any of the cultures at any passage. In contrast to previous

data from adipose tissue-derived MSCs, pHPL was found

to be the most suitable FBS substitute in clinical scale

BM-MSC expansion. S

TEM


C

ELLS


2009;27:2331–2341

Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

I

NTRODUCTION



Bone marrow (BM) is a complex tissue harboring hematopoi-

etic stem and progenitor cells, endothelial cells, adipocytes,

osteocytes, and fibroblastoid stromal cells. On cell culture

expansion, BM can yield a multipotent precursor population.

These mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been assessed

in a variety of preclinical and clinical settings ranging from

regenerative medicine to immunological or hematopoietic

support [1]. With MSCs becoming established in the clinical

setting, issues have been raised regarding how to expand these

cells in large-scale good-manufacturing practice (GMP)-com-

pliant protocols [2–4]. Most expansion protocols use a me-

dium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS). Serum

supplementation is practical because it provides the cells with

vital nutrients, attachment factors, and growth factors. How-

ever, the use of xenogenic serum is complicated because of

high lot-to-lot variability and is associated with a risk of

transmitting infectious agents and immunizing effects [5–7].

Regulatory guidelines aiming to minimize the use of FBS

have further reinforced an intensive search for possible

Author contributions: K.B.: Conception and design, financial support, administrative support, collection and assembly of data, data

analysis, manuscript writing; A.H.: Conception and design, collection and assembly of data, data analysis, manuscript writing, final

approval of the manuscript; A.K.: Conception and design, provision of study material; H.L.: provision of study material, collection of

data; K.S.: provision of study material, manuscript writing; D.S.: financial support, data interpretation, manuscript editing; H.K.:

financial and administrative support, final approval of the manuscript. K.B. and A.H. contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence: Karen Bieback, Ph.D., Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service of

Baden-Wu¨rttemberg-Hessen, Faculty of Clinical Medicine Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Ludolf-Krehl-Str. 13-17, 68167

Mannheim, Germany. Telephone: 49-621-383-9720; Fax: 49-621-383-9720;; e-mail: karen.bieback@medma.uni-heidelberg.de

Received


February 11, 2009; accepted for publication May 21, 2009; first published online in

S

TEM



C

ELLS


E

XPRESS


June 4, 2009.

V

C



AlphaMed

Press 1066-5099/2009/$30.00/0 doi: 10.1002/stem.139

S

TEM


C

ELLS


2009;27:2331–2341 www.StemCells.com

alternatives [8–10]. Most current clinical data have been

accomplished with MSCs having been expanded in FBS sup-

plemented media without the appearance of major side

effects. In some cases, however, immunological reactions and

anti-FBS antibodies have been observed and considered as

having possibly affected the therapeutic outcome [7, 11].

A chemically defined standardized, xenogeneic antigen-

and serum-free media composition would be the preferential

solution for pharmaceutical scale manufacturing. Such a for-

mulation allowing for both isolation and expansion has not

been achieved thus far [12]. Based on extensive demand, FBS

may also become scarce and expensive.

In the development of a cell-based medicinal product, any

change in the manufacturing process that impacts final prod-

uct quality must show comparability or superiority [13].

Human blood products are already considered to represent

drugs and are produced accordingly, thus offering certain

advantages as potential FBS substitutes. Accordingly, a vari-

ety of human supplements have been postulated as alterna-

tives to FBS to provide nutrients, attachment factors, and

especially growth factors. These include autologous or alloge-

neic human serum, human plasma, cord blood serum, human

platelet derivatives including platelet lysate, and platelet

released factors [3, 4, 14-24]. Analysis of platelet releasates,

lysates, and subcellular fractions has shown that numerous

bioactive molecules are stored within distinct platelet organ-

elles including adhesive proteins, coagulation factors, mito-

gens, protease inhibitors, and proteoglycans [25]. Compared

with serum, buffy coat-derived platelet preparations are of

particular interest because they do not compete with erythro-

cyte and plasma preparation for the limited available blood

donations [26].

In a previous study, we evaluated a variety of platelet

activation protocols to obtain biologically active proteins to

isolate and expand MSCs. Thrombin-activated platelet relea-

sate in plasma (tPRP) and human blood type AB serum (HS)

were found to be superior adjuvants in isolating and expand-

ing human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) [27].

The efficiency of both HS and tPRP, but not of pooled human

platelet lysate (pHPL), in expanding AT-MSCs was notable in

contrast to previous reports on BM-MSCs [20, 28]. Conse-

quently, in a recent study we compared the effects of these

three human alternatives on the isolation, expansion, differen-

tiation, and immunomodulatory capacities, as well as the

immunophenotype of BM-MSCs using FBS as the standard

substitute. The experimental setup was expanded by additional

analysis of product purity, because our previous observations

showed reduced depletion of contaminating hematopoietic

cells in AT-MSCs cultured in human supplements. In this

new study, the standard Ficoll gradient density centrifugation

method was therefore compared with the enrichment of MSCs

by either depleting mature hematopoietic cells or by purifying

MSCs expressing CD271 (low affinity nerve growth factor re-

ceptor [LNGFR]) and cultivating the obtained mononuclear

cells in the four different supplements.

M

ATERIALS AND



M

ETHODS


Media and Supplements

Dulbecco modified Eagle’s medium low glucose (Lonza Group

Ltd., Basel, Switzerland, http://www.lonza.com), supplemented

with


4

mM

L



-glutamine

(PAA,


Coelbe,

Germany,


http://

www.paa.at), 50,000 units (U) penicillin/50,000

lg streptomycin

(PAA) served as basal medium in all instances. It was completed

with (a) 10% FBS (MSCGM Single Quots; Lonza Group Ltd.),

(b) 10% HS, (c) 10% tPRP, or (d) 10% pHPL.

Human AB Serum

HS was derived from whole blood donations of prescreened AB

blood group-typed donors. From each donor, whole blood was

drained into blood bags without anticoagulants and allowed to clot

overnight at 4



C. The serum was aliquoted and separated by cen-



trifugation at 2,000

g for 15 minutes. Subsequently, the supernatant

was aliquoted into 15-ml sterile tubes (Greiner Bio-One, Fricken-

hausen, Germany, http://www.gbo.com/en) and frozen at –30



C.

After thawing aliquots from at least five donors, HS was pooled



and sterilely filtered through 0.2-

lm pore filters (Nalgene filtration

device; Nalgene Nunc International, Rochester, NY, USA, http://

www.nuncbrand.com). HS-supplemented medium was pretested to

maintain its mitogenic capacity over a period of at least 4 weeks.

Thus, HS medium was not freshly made for each individual use.

At least 10 different pools were checked to verify reproducibility.

Thrombin-Activated Platelet Releasate Plasma

Four whole blood donations of AB or O blood group-typed donors

were used to prepare one pooled platelet concentrate derived from

buffy coats. Instead of using an additive solution like T-Sol, the

pooled platelet concentrate was suspended in AB plasma of one

donor. Platelet counts ranged between 20

 10


11

and 30


 10

11

platelets per liter determined by CellDyn 3,200 (Abbott, Wiesba-



den, Germany, http://www.abbott.de). Subsequently, the platelet

concentrate was activated by 1 U of human thrombin (Sigma

Aldrich, Hamburg, Germany, http://www.sigmaaldrich.com) [27].

The released factors were separated from the cellular debris by

centrifugation at 3,000

g, followed by filtration through 0.2-lm

pores. By pooling two pooled platelet concentrates, tPRP finally

represented eight donors. Five-milliliter aliquots were stored at

–80



C. After thawing, the aliquot was centrifuged again for 5



minutes at 1,500

g to remove any developing clots. To prevent in

vitro gel formation, 2 U of heparin (Heparin-Natrium-5000-ratio-

pharm; Ratiopharm, Ulm, Germany, http://www.ratiopharm.de)/ml

of medium was added before the tPRP. tPRP was shown to rapidly

lose mitogenic activity. A storage time exceeding 48 hours

resulted in extensive loss of mitogenic activity; thus, the medium

was prepared freshly for each individual use. To verify reproduci-

bility, at least 11 different pools were applied.

Pooled Human Platelet Lysate

pHPL was prepared in Graz as previously described [3]. Briefly,

four buffy coat units of blood group O-typed donors were pooled

in AB plasma and centrifuged (340

g, 6 minutes, 22



C). The pla-



telet rich plasma (PRP) was leukocyte depleted by inline filtration

and was frozen at –30



C. After thawing at 37





C, at least 10 units

of freeze-thaw lysed human platelets were further pooled result-

ing in approximately 40-50 donations per batch to minimize do-

nor variations. pHPL was aliquoted and stored at –30



C. Before



use in cell culture, pHPL was thawed and centrifuged at 4,000

g

for 15 minutes, whereas only the supernatant was added to the



culture medium containing 2 U/ml of preservative-free heparin.

Reproducibility of pHPL effects was verified by using at least

seven different batches of pHPL identically prepared in Mann-

heim by pooling platelet concentrates from eight donors. Where

specified, tPRP and pHPL were prepared from one platelet con-

centrate split in two halves to directly compare both.

Isolation and Culture of BM-Derived MSCs

BM aspirates were harvested using an optimized bone marrow

harvesting technique [29]. Illiac crest bone marrow aspirates were

derived from 14 young healthy donors (median age 22) after hav-

ing received informed consent. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) were

isolated from all heparinized BM aspirates by density gradient

centrifugation (Ficoll Paque, GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden,

http://www.gehealthcare.com) as described elsewhere [30]. Inde-

pendent of the cell number, the MNCs were split into equal sub-

fractions and cultured within the respective basal medium

2332

Human Alternatives to FBS for BM-MSC Expansion



supplemented with either FBS (

n ¼ 14), HS (n ¼ 12), tPRP (n ¼

12), or pHPL (

n ¼ 6) (Fig. 1B).

In

n ¼ 6 BM samples, MSC enrichment using RosetteSep



(StemCell Technologies Inc, St. Katharinen, Germany, http://

www.cellsystems.de) was compared with Ficoll-only isolation.

The RosetteSep antibody cocktail (CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD16,

CD19, CD56, CD66b, and glycophorin A) crosslinks undesirable

cells and forms immunorosettes with red blood cells. These are

pelleted after Ficoll gradient centrifugation. In this case, the BM

aspirate was split into two equal aliquots before MNC isolation.

Resulting cells were cultured in media supplemented with FBS,

HS, or tPRP. On four other samples, CD271 (LNGFR) enrich-

ment was performed in one half of the BM sample, whereas the

other half was split to perform Ficoll and RosetteSep separation.

CD271 sorting involved a magnetic bead-assisted preselection

(AutoMACS device; program ‘‘Possel D’’ [2 columns] and ‘‘Possel

S’’ [sensitive]) using CD271 microbeads (Miltenyi Biotec GmbH,

Bergisch Gladbach, Germany, http://www.miltenyibiotec.com).

Because purity reached, at best, 80%, a flow cytometric sorting fol-

lowed the enrichment (BD FACS Vantage TM SE: sorter used for

flow cytometric cell sorting). This yielded a

>99% CD271

þ

cell



population as assured by flow cytometric analysis (CD 271-FITC

and CD 271-PE; Miltenyi Biotec GmbH).

All cell cultures were incubated with the respective supple-

ments at 37



C, 5% CO


2

in a humidified atmosphere. In a standar-

dized fashion, all nonadherent cells were removed 24 hours after

initial plating by media changes. The cells were cultured with

media changed twice weekly until reaching confluence of 70-

80%. At this time, cells were passaged using 1

 trypsin-EDTA

(PAA). At each passage (p), cells were replated at a standard

density of 200 cells per cm

2

at any subsequent passage.



Proliferation Kinetics

Cells were passaged and counted once they reached a subconflu-

ence of 70-80%. The population doubling (PD) rate was deter-

mined using the following formula [31]:

X ¼

½log10ðN


H

Þ À log10ðN

1

ފ

log10



ð2Þ

N

H



is the harvested cell number and

N

1



is the plated cell

number. The PD for each passage was calculated and added to

the PD of the previous passages to generate data for cumulative

population doublings (CPD).

In addition, the generation time (average time between two

cells doublings) of four BM within all media conditions was cal-

culated at passage 1 (p1) and p4 using the following formula:

X ¼


log2

 Dt


log

ðN

H



Þ À logðN

1

Þ



The effects of heparin and thrombin, which are present in

tPRP and pHPL, were checked separately. BM-MSCs of two

donors were cultured in (a) 10% FBS, (b) 10% FBS

þ 2 U hepa-

rin/ml, or (c) 10% FBS

þ 1 U thrombin/ml for three passages.

No impact on MSC growth kinetics was observed within the

three passages.

Colony-Forming Unit-Fibroblast Assays

The colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay in primary cul-

ture was determined for six donor BM, and colonies were

Figure 1.

Morphology of bone marrow

(BM)-mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)

and BM-MSC allocation to specific tests.

(A): Photomicrographs of one representa-

tive donor at primary culture at day 10 for

fetal bovine serum human serum, thrombin-

activated platelet releasate in plasma, and

pooled human platelet lysate are shown in

rows. Columns reflect cells either isolated

using Ficoll density centrifugation, deple-

tion of lineage positive cells by RosetteSep,

or CD271 selection followed by plastic ad-

hesion.

Magnification,



Â100. (B): The

scheme shows the total number BM sam-

ples and those used for the respective paral-

lel tests. Numbers of BM samples were

reduced in subsequent passages because of

replicative senescence-induced growth re-

tardation. Abbreviations: FBS, fetal bovine

serum; HS, pooled human serum; tPRP,

pooled

thrombin-activated



platelet-rich-

plasma;


pHPL,

pooled


human

platelet


lysate.

Bieback, Hecker, Kocao¨mer et al.

2333

www.StemCells.com



counted after 10 days. Freshly isolated BM-MNCs derived from

the three different isolation methods and cultured within the four

different media were plated in duplicate in 6-well plates at den-

sities of 1

 10

4

, 5



 10

4

, and 1



 10

5

per well. On day 10, the



cell layer was fixed with methanol and stained with Giemsa solu-

tion (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany, http://www.merck.de). Individ-

ual colonies composed of at least 50 cells were counted. CFU-F

frequency was calculated based on the respective input cell num-

ber as CFU-F per 1

 10


4

MNCs.


In Vitro Differentiation Potential

The adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity of MSCs

was assessed at p2/p3 for all BM donors and for all culture con-

ditions [27]. To detect the osteogenic differentiation, cells were

stained for calcium deposition using von Kossa stain. Adipogenic

differentiation was indicated by the morphological appearance of

lipid droplets stained with Oil Red O.

Flow Cytometry Analysis

Immunophenotypic analyses were performed on three BM-MSC

batches for all supplements and selected MSC samples derived

from the different isolation methods at p3.

The following mouse anti-human antibodies were used in

multiplexed flow cytometric analysis: CD105-FITC (clone 8E11;

Chemicon/Millipore, Schwalbach/TS, Germany, http://www.milli-

pore.com), CD144-PE (TEA1/31; Beckman Coulter GmbH,

Krefeld, Germany, http://www.beckman.com), CD90-APC (5E10;

Becton Dickinson GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany, http://www.

bdeurope.com),

CD106-FITC

(51-10C9;

Becton

Dickinson



GmbH), CD146-PE (TEA-1/34; Beckman Coulter), CD34-PerCP-

Cy5.5 (8G12; Becton Dickinson GmbH), CD133/1-APC (AC133;

Miltenyi), CD44-APC-Alexa750 (IM7; NatuTec, Frankfurt/Main,

Germany, http://www.natutec.de), CD15-FITC (HI98; Becton

Dickinson

GmbH),


CD45-FITC

(HI30;


Becton

Dickinson

GmbH),

CD3-FITC


(UCHT1;

Becton


Dickinson

GmbH),


CD235a-FITC (GA-R2; Becton Dickinson GmbH), CD14-FITC

(M5E2; Becton Dickinson GmbH), CD19-FITC (AE1; Diatec/

Dianova Hamburg, Germany, http://www.dianova.de), CD117-PE

(104D2; Becton Dickinson GmbH), CD33-PerCP-Cy5.5 (P67.6;

Becton Dickinson GmbH), CD31-APC (WM59; NatuTec), CD29-

APC-Cy7 (TS2/16 BioLegend/Biozol Eching b, Mu¨nchen, Ger-

many, http://www.biozol.de), CD73-PE (AD2; Becton Dickinson

GmbH), HLA-ABC-APC (G46-2.6; Becton Dickinson GmbH),

HLA-DR-PE-Cy7 (L243; Becton Dickinson GmbH), and 7-AAD

(Beckman Coulter) for dead cell exclusion. The samples were an-

alyzed using the BD FACS-Canto II and DIVA software. Com-

parative analysis was performed with FlowJo Version 7.2.5 (Tree

Star, Inc., Ashland, OR, USA, http://www.treestar.com).

Inhibition of Phytohemagglutin-Induced

T-Cell Proliferation


Kataloq: 2015
2015 -> Oitsning ma’nosi – Orttirilgan Immunitet Tanqisligi Sindromi. Bu dahshatli va bedavo kasallik hozirgi zamonning “vabosi” deb yuritiladi
2015 -> 4 İstehlakçıların davranışının modelləşdirilməsi Son istehlakçıların davranışının modelləşdirilməsi
2015 -> Klinik protokol Az ərbaycan Respublikas
2015 -> Üz–çənə cərrahiyyəsi Bölmə Gicgah-çənə oynağının xəstəlikləri və zədələnmələri 1 Çənə oynağının çıxığının əsas səbəbi nədir?
2015 -> Üz–çənə cərrahiyyəsi Bölmə Gicgah-çənə oynağının xəstəlikləri və zədələnmələri 1 Çənə oynağının çıxığının əsas səbəbi nədir?
2015 -> Stomatologiya 1 Sistem hipoplaziyası zamanı hansı dişlər zədələnir?
2015 -> Приложение №3 Информированное согласие пациента на пародонтологическое лечение
2015 -> Myuller h p parodontologiya pdf
2015 -> Buklet Azərbaycan Respublikası Prezidentinin 2011-ci il 7 iyul tarixli

Yüklə 0,77 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə