Propolis: chemical composition, biological properties and therapeutic activity



Yüklə 0,68 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/6
tarix18.04.2017
ölçüsü0,68 Mb.
#14617
1   2   3   4   5   6

3-methylbut-2-enyl 

caffeate


and 

3-methylbutyl 

ferulate 

(Bankova 

et al,

1987; 


Amoros 

et al, 


1994).

Antifungal activity

Millet-Clerc 

et al (1987) reported 

that propo-

lis  exhibited 

an 

important 



antifungal 

activ-


ity against 

Trichophyton 

and 

Mycrosporum



in 

the presence of 

propylene glycol, 

which


interacts 

synergistically 

at 



5% 



concentra-

tion. 


Combinations of 

some 


antimycotic

drugs 


with 

propolis (10%) 

increased their

activity 

on 

Candida albicans 



yeasts. 

The


greatest 

synergistic 

effect 

against 


most

strains 


was 

obtained when 

propolis 

was


added 

to 


antifungal 

drugs (Holderna 

and

Kedzia,  1987). 



Valdés 

et al (1987) 

tested

30 


propolis samples produced 

in 


Cuba

against 


strains of 

C albicans.  Lisa 

et 


al

(1989) 


verified the 

antifungal activity 

of

propolis 



extracts 

(10% 


in 

ethanol)  against

17 

fungal pathogens. 



The EEP inhibited

Candida and all tested 

dermatophytes. 

Fer-


nandes Junior 

et 


al 

(1994) 


evaluated the

antifungal 

activity 

of EEP 


against 

albi-



cans, 

parapsilosis, 



tropicalis 

and 



guil-



liermondii; 

98% 


of 

fungi 


samples 

were 


sen-

sitive 


to EEP 

concentrations 

of less than

5.0%. Lori 

(1990) 

observed that in  in vitro



tests, 

propolis 

concentrations of 5 

or 


10%

prevented growth 

of 

Trichophyton 



verruco-

sum. 


The 

antifungal activity 

of 

propolis 



was

observed in 

some 

plant 


fungi 

in vitro 

(La

Torre 


et al, 

1990).


Cytotoxic 

activity


Extracts of 

propolis 

have been examined

for in vitro 

cytotoxic activity by 

different meth-

ods of tissue culture in 

some 


cell  lines.

Hladón 


et al (1980) investigated 

the 


cyto-

static 


activity 

of 


propolis 

extracts 

on 

human


KB 

(nasopharinx carcinoma) 

and HeLa

(human 


cervical 

carcinoma) 

cell lines. The

ethereal 

propolis 

fraction 

(DEEP) 

exhibited



the 

strongest cytostatic 

activity. 

The 


sec-

ondary 


fractions of 

ethyl 


acetate 

and butanol

of DEEP 

presented 

good activity. 



Inter-

mediate 


activity 

was 


verified 

in 


the

CHCl


3

/DEEP 


fraction. The 

killing 


action 

of

propolis 



on 

HeLa cells 

was 

tested 


by 

Ban


et 

al 


(1983). 

A concentration of 10 

mg/ml

caused 50% inhibition  of 



colony-forming

ability. 

In 

assessing 



the 

killing 


action of

propolis, 

flavonoids 

were 


also tested. HeLa

cells 


were 

found 


to 

be 


more 

sensitive 

to

quercetin 



and 

rhamnetin, 

but less sensitive

to 


galangin.  Grunberger 

et 


al 

(1988)


described caffeic acid 

phenethyl 

ester

(CAPE) 


as 

the 


compound partially 

respon-


sible for the 

cytostatic properties 

of propo-

lis.  The effect of 

CAPE 

on 


human 

cancer


cell  lines 

was 


tested 

in 


breast carcinoma

(MCF-7) 


and melanoma 

(SK-MEL-28 

and


SK-MEL-170) 

cell  lines in  culture. A dose

of  10 

μg/ml 



of CAPE 

completely 

inhibited

the 


incorporation 

of 


[

3

H]thymidine 



into the

DNA of breast carcinoma. More dramatic

effects 

were 


observed in  the 

melanoma,

colon 

(HT 29) 


and renal 

carcinoma cell 

lines,

but the 


CAPE effect 

on 


normal fibroblasts

and 


melanocytes 

was 


significantly 

less.


Because the 

cytostatic 

action of CAPE is

more 


effective in transformed 

cells, 


it  is 

rea-


sonable 

to 


assume 

that it  is 

responsible 

for


the claimed carcinostatic 

properties 

of

propolis.



The antitumoral 

activity 

of caffeic acid

derivatives, 

eg, 

methyl 


ferulate, 

methyl acetyl

ferulate, methyl acetyl 

isoferulate and 

methyl

diacetyl 



caffeate, 

was 


reported by Inayama

et 


al, 

1984. 


The 

effect of other caffeic acid

derivatives has been 

investigated by König

(1988). 

Ross 


(1990) reported 

that 


the 

cyto-


toxic 

effect of 

propolis 

in vitro 

against 

Chi-


nese 

hamster ovary 

cancer 

cell  lines 



was

due 


to 

naphthalene 

derivatives in 

propolis.

In vitro tests of 

extracts 

of Brazilian 

propolis


from 

mellifera 



on 

human 


hepatocellular

carcinoma, 

KB and HeLa cell lines showed

that the 

cytotoxic 

effects 


were 

caused 


by

quercetin, 

caffeic acid and 

phenyl 


ester 

con-


stituents of 

propolis (Matsuno, 1992).

Scheller 

et 


al 

(1989c) 


reported 

cytotoxic



activity 

of 


propolis 

in  mice 

bearing 

Ehrlich


carcinoma in vivo.

Antiprotozoan activity

Scheller 

et al (1977b) reported antiproto-

zoan 

activity 



of 

propolis (EEP) 

in vitro 

on 


3

strains of Trichomonas 

vaginalis. 

EEP solu-

tions 

in 


vitro 

presented 

lethal 


activity 

on

strains 



at 

concentration of 150 



mg/ml.

The 


antiprotozoan activity 

of 


propolis

was 


verified 

in 


experimental 

animals 


infected

with  Eimeria 

magna, 



media and 



per-


forans treated with 3% EEP and other

antiprotozoan drugs. 

The coccidiostatic

effect of 

propolis 

was 


higher 

than other

drugs (Hollands 

et al, 


1988a). Propolis

preparations 

were 

classified 



as a 

good 


coc-

cidiostat 

against 

Chilomonas 

paramecium

(Hollands 

etal, 

1988b). 


Torres 

et al (1990)

evaluated the 

effect of EEP 

on 

the 


growth 

of

the 



protozoan 

parasite 

Giardia lamblia  in

vitro. At 

an 

EEP concentration of 11.6 



mg/ml

there 


was a 

98% 


inhibition 

effect.


Other 

properties

Many 

other 


biological 

and 


pharmacological

properties 

of 

propolis 



have been described

by 


various 

authors, 

including 

regeneration 

of

cartilaginous 



tissue 

(Scheller 

et al, 

1977a),


bone tissue 

(Stojko 


et al, 

1978) 


and dental

pulp 


(Scheller 

et al,  1978; 

Magro 

Filho and



Perri de 

Carvalho, 

1990), 

anaesthetic 



activ-

ity  (Paintz 

and 

Metzner, 



1979), hepato-

protective activity 

(Giurgea 

et al, 1985, 1987;

Hollands 

et al, 1991; 

Tushevskii 

et al, 


1991),

increasing 

the number of 

plaque-forming

cells in the 

spleen 


of 

populations 

of immu-

nized  males 

(Scheller 

et 


al, 

1988),


immunomodulatory 

action 


(Benková 

et 


al,

1989; 


Dimov 

et al,  1991, 

1992), 

immuno-


genic properties (Scheller 

et al, 


1989d), 

liver


detoxifying 

action, 


choleretic and antiulcer

action in vitro 

(Kedzia 

et al, 


1990), 

antioxi-


dant 

activity 

(Yanishlieva 

and 


Marinova,

1986; 


Krol 

et al,  1990; 

Scheller 

et al,  1990;

Dobrowolski 

et al,  1991; 

Misic 

et al,  1991;



Olinescu, 1991; 

Volpert and 

Elstner, 1993a,

1993b), 


anticaries in 

rats 


(Ikeno 

et al, 


1991), 

protection agent against 

gamma irradiation

in  mice 

(Scheller 

et al, 


1989b), 

antileish-

maniosis 

in 


hamster 

(Sartori 

et al, 

1994),


antitrypanosomal 

agent 


(Higashi 

et al, 


1991)

and  inhibition 

of 

dihydrofolate 



reductase

activity 

(Strehl et al,  1994).

Toxicity


As 

propolis 

use 

increases, 



its 

side-effects

are 

observed 



more 

frequently (Wanscher,



1976; Petersen, 1977; 

Monti 


et al,  1983;

Ayala 


et al,  1985; 

Machácková, 

1985;

Rudzki 


et al,  1985; 

Tosti 


et al, 1985; 

Cirasino


et al,  1987; 

Hausen 


et al,  1987b; 

Sartoris


et al,  1987; 

Young, 


1987; 

Hay 


and 

Greig,


1990). 

Propolis 

contains 

some 


compounds

which 


cause 

toxicity. Beekeeper’s 

dermati-

tis  due 

to 

propolis 



is  well  known and 

an

apparent 



association between 

sensitivity 

to

propolis 



and 

to 


poplar 

resins has been

observed 

(Hausen 


et al,  1987a, 

b).


Hausen 

et al (1987b) 

described the inci-

dence 


of 

nearly 


200 

cases 


of 

allergic 

con-

tact 


dermatitis due 

to 


propolis. 

They 


identified

substance 



1,1-dimethylallyl 

caffeic acid

(LB-1) responsible 

for the 


allergy. 

They 


also

described the 

sensitizing properties 

of LB-


in 


guinea pigs provoked by 

several propo-

lis 

samples, demonstrating 



that this 

com-


pound 

is the main sensitizer in 

propolis. 

The


flavonoid 

tectochrysin 

was 

considered 



a sec-

ond 


allergen, although 

Schmalle 

et al (1986)

stated that 

tectochrysin 

was a 


very weak

sensitizer.  Hashimoto 

et al (1988) 

verified


the 

allergenic properties 

of 

phenylethyl 



and

prenyl 


esters 

of caffeic acids from 

propolis.

Observations 

of 

propolis 



used 

orally 


sug-

gest 


that intestinal 

absorption 

could 

play 


an

important 

role in 

propolis 

sensitization. Lim-

iting 


the 

extent 


of oral administration may

be useful in 

preventing propolis allergy

(Angelini 

et al,  1987; 

Hausen 


et al,  1987a,

1988; 


Kleinhans, 1987; 

Trevisan and 

Kokelj,

1987; 


Machácková, 

1988).


Therapeutic 

activity


Propolis 

has been used since ancient times

in  the remedies in 

folk medicine in  many

parts 

of the world 



(Ghisalberti, 1979). 

It  has


long 


tradition 

of medicinal 

use 

in  many


parts 

of the world. 

Many 

European 



coun-

tries 


are 

interested in  natural 

products 

to

heal diseases and 



propolis 

is 


an 

important

product 

used for this purpose. It is found in

pharmaceutical 

and 


cosmetic 

products, 

such

as 


anti-acne 

lotion, 


face 

creams, 


ointments,

lotions and solutions 

(Debuyser, 

1983; 


Leje-

une 


et al,  1988; 

Pons and 

Cueto, 

1988,


1989; Goetz, 

1990).


Propolis 

in 


dermatology

Bolshakova 

(1975) 

treated 110 



patients

infected with 

Trichophyton 

on 


the 

hairy 


zone

of the  head with  50% 

propolis (as 

an

unguent). 



In 97 

patients, 

it 

was 


found 

to 


pro-

duce excellent results. 

Other 

examples 



of

the 


treatment 

of 


dermatological 

diseases


were 

described when 

propolis 

was 


used 

as

an 



antiseptic (Bolshakova, 

1975; 


Gafar 

et

al, 



1986), antimycotic (Holderna 

and 


Kedzia,

1987; 


Millet-Clerc 

et al, 


1987), 

bacteriostatic

(Soboleva 

et al,  1990; 

Dobrowolski 

et al,


1991; 

Stark 


and 

Glinski, 1993; Ventura Coll

et al, 

1993), 


antiviral 

(Giurcaneanu 

et al,

1988; 


Vachy 

et al, 


1990) 

and 


fungistatic

(Millet-Clerc 

et al, 

1987) agent. Many 



other

propolis applications 

in 

dermatology 



have

been described. It  has been used 

for wound

healing, 

tissue 

regeneration, 



treatment 

of

burns, neurodermatitis, 



microbial 

eczema,


contact 

dermatitis, 

leg 

ulcers, 


psoriasis, 

mor-


phea, herpes simplex 

and 


genitalis,  pruri-

tus 


ani, 

dermatophytes, trophic 

ulcers, 

pulp


gangrene and 

as an 


astringent 

(Bolshakova,

1975; 

Molnar-Toth, 1975; 



Scheller 

et al,


1977a, 1978; 

Ghisalberti,  1979; 

Korsun,

1983; 


Gafar 

et al,  1986; 

Hausen 

et al,


1987a; 

Giurcaneanu 

et al,  1988; 

Ponce de


Leon and 

Benitez, 1988; 

Goetz, 

1990; 


Fierro

Morales, 

1994).

Propolis 



in 

otorhinolaryngologic

(ORL) 

diseases


Matel 

et al (1973) 

described the 

treatment 

of

126 


subjects 

suffering 

of external 

otitis,


chronic 

mesotympanic 

otitis  and 

tympan


perforation 

with 


propolis 

solutions 

(5-10%)

which had 



positive therapeutic 

result in


most 

cases. 


Propolis 

effects in  other 

ORL

diseases 



were 

reported: 

acute 

inflamma-



tions of the 

ear 


(Kachnii, 

1975; 


Palos 

et al,


1989), 

treatment 

of 

mesotympanitis (Pop-



nikolov 

et 


al, 

1973),  pharyngitis

(Doroshenko, 1975), 

tuberculosis 

(Karimova

and 


Rodionova, 

1975), 


chronic bronchitis

(Chuhrienko 

et al,  1989; 

Scheller 

et al,

1989a), rhinopharyngolaryngitis (Isakbaev,



1986), 

pharyngolaryngitis 

(Lin 

et al, 


1993a)

vasomotor 

catarrh 

treatment 

(Zommer-

Urbanska 

et al, 

1987) 


and rhinitis 

(Nuñez

et al, 

1988/1989).



Propolis 

in 


gynecological 

diseases


Zawadzki and Scheller 

(1973) 


investigated

90 


cases 

of 


therapeutic activity 

of 


3% 

EEP in


cases 

of 


vagina 

and 


uterus 

cervix inflam-

mation 

caused 


by 

pyogenes. 



They

observed that 

more 

than 50% 



of the 

cases


responded 

well 


to treatment 

with EEP. The

action of 

propolis 

to treat 

inflammatory 

and

distrophic 



lesions of the female 

genital 


sys-

tem 


caused 

by protozoan 

and 

fungi 


has been

studied. 

Some 

137 


cases 

of 


diffuse inflam-

mations, 

ulcerations and ex-ulcerations 

of

cervix uteri diseases 



were 

investigated by

Roman 

et al (1989). 



After 20-25 d of 

asso-


ciated 

treatment 

(allopathic 

and 


apithera-

peutic) 


very 

good 


results 

were 


obtained in 

53

cases, 



good 

results in 

24, 

and 


satisfactory 

in

28 



cases. 

The results obtained 

by 

Roman 


et

al (1989) 

confirm that 

propolis potentiates

the 

antiseptic,  antifungal 



and  antit-

rychomonas 

actions 

of 


specific 

chemical


medicines. 

Stojko 


and 

Stojko 


(1993) 

also


reported 

the 


use 

of 


propolis preparations

for 


treatment 

of 


gynecological 

disorders.

Propolis 

in 


stomatology

Mirayes 


et 

al 


(1988) 

described 

clinical


assay with 

an 


extract 

of 


propolis 

that showed

its 

efficacy against giardiasis. 



Some 138

patients 

were 

studied, 



48 

children and 90

adults, 

and treated with 

propolis (in 

children,

concentration of 10% and adults 

20%). 


At

these 


concentrations, 

52% 


of the children

showed 


a cure. 

In 


adults, 

the 


propolis 

effect


was 

the 


same as 

tinidazole, 

an 

antiproto-



zoan 

drug. 


When the 

propolis 

concentra-

tion 


was 

elevated 

to 

30%, 


there 

was a


higher 

efficacy (60% 

cure versus 

40% 



Yüklə 0,68 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə