Principles for Codevelopment of an 1 In Vitro Companion Diagnostic



Yüklə 0,62 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/6
tarix26.02.2017
ölçüsü0,62 Mb.
#9737
  1   2   3   4   5   6

Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 

Draft - Not for Implementation 

 

 



Principles for Codevelopment of an

 

1

In Vitro Companion Diagnostic 

2

Device with a Therapeutic Product 

 

3

4



5

Draft Guidance for Industry and 

6

Food and Drug Administration Staff  

7

8

DRAFT GUIDANCE 



9

This guidance document is being distributed for comment purposes only.

  

10



Document issued on: July 15, 2016 

11

12



You should submit comments and suggestions regarding this draft document within 90 days 

13

of publication in the Federal Register of the notice announcing the availability of the draft 



14

guidance.  Submit written comments to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), 

15

Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852.  Submit 



16

electronic comments to 

http://www.regulations.gov.

  Identify all comments with the docket 

17

number listed in the notice of availability that publishes in the Federal Register



18

19

For questions about this document, contact CDRH’s Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and 



20

Radiological Health at 301-796-5711 or Pamela Bradley at 240-731-3734 or 

21

Pamela.Bradley@fda.hhs.gov



; CBER’s Office of Communication, Outreach and Development, 

22

at 1-800-835-4709 or 240-402-8010; or for CDER, please contact Christopher Leptak at 301-



23

796-0017


 or 

Christopher.Leptak@fda.hhs.gov

 

24



25

 

26 



U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 

27

Food and Drug Administration 

28

Center for Devices and Radiological Health 

29

Center for Drug Evaluation and Research 

30

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

31


Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 

Draft - Not for Implementation 

 

 



32

Preface 

33

34



35

Additional Copies 

36

37



CDRH

 

38



Additional copies are available from the Internet.  You may also send an e-mail request to 

39

CDRH-Guidance@fda.hhs.gov



 to receive a copy of the guidance. Please use the document 

40

number 1400027 to identify the guidance you are requesting. 



41

42

CBER

  

43

Additional copies are available from the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research 



44

(CBER) by written request, Office of Communication, Outreach and Development, Bldg. 71, 

45

Room 3128, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993; by telephone, 1-800-



46

835-4709 or 240-402-8010; by email, 

ocod@fda.hhs.gov

; or from the Internet at 

47

http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/de



48

fault.htm

49

50



CDER

  

51



Additional copies of this guidance document are also available from the Center for 

52

Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) by written request to: Office of 



53

Communications, Division of Drug Information, WO51, Room 2201, Center for Drug 

54

Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire 



55

Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, or by telephone, 301-796-3400; or from the Internet 

56

at 


57

http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/de

58

fault.htm



59

60



Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 

Draft - Not for Implementation 

 

 



Table of Contents 

61

62



I.

 

Introduction ................................................................................................................... 4



63

II.


 

Background ................................................................................................................... 6

64

III.


 

Principles of the Codevelopment Process ..................................................................... 7

65

A.

 



General .......................................................................................................................... 8

66

B.



 

Regulation of Investigational IVDs and Therapeutic Products .................................... 9

67

1.

 



Risk Assessment and IDE Requirements .......................................................... 10

68

2.



 

Submission of Investigational IVD Information Related to Investigational 

69

Drugs or Biological Products ...................................................................................... 13



70

3.

 



IDE Applications for Investigational IVDs in Codevelopment Trials .............. 14

71

C.



 

Planning Ahead for IVD Validation in Potential Codevelopment Programs ............. 15

72

1.

 



Expectation for Analytical Validation Prior to Investigational IVD Use in 

73

Therapeutic Product Trials .......................................................................................... 15



74

2.

 



New Intended Uses for IVDs ............................................................................ 16

75

3.



 

IVD Prototypes in Early-Phase Therapeutic Product Clinical Trials ............... 16

76

4.

 



Using Research Use Only Components as Part of a Test System .................... 17

77

5.



 

Prescreening for Eligibility for Therapeutic Product Clinical Trials ................ 18

78

6.

 



Preanalytic Procedures and Testing Protocols .................................................. 19

79

7.



 

Planning Ahead for Analytical Validation Studies ........................................... 19

80

D.

 



Therapeutic Product Clinical Trial Design Considerations ........................................ 20

81

1.



 

General Considerations for Early Therapeutic Product Development ............. 21

82

2.

 



General Considerations for Late Therapeutic Product Development ............... 22

83

3.



 

Prognostic and Predictive Markers ................................................................... 24

84

4.

 



Prospective-Retrospective Approaches ............................................................ 25

85

5.



 

Considerations for Identifying Intended Populations ....................................... 26

86

E.

 



Considerations for IVD Development in Late Therapeutic Product Development .... 28

87

1.



 

Training Samples Sets versus Validation Samples Sets ................................... 29

88

2.

 



Effect of Changes to the Test Design ............................................................... 29

89

3.



 

IVD Bridging Studies ....................................................................................... 30

90

4.

 



Special Protocol Assessments ........................................................................... 31

91

F.



 

Planning for Contemporaneous Marketing Authorizations ........................................ 32

92

1.

 



Coordinating Review Timelines ....................................................................... 32

93

2.



 

When Contemporaneous Marketing Authorization is Not Possible ................. 37

94

3.

 



Shipment and Verification of an IVD Companion Diagnostic Prior to 

95

Marketing Authorization ............................................................................................. 37



96

G.

 



Labeling Considerations ............................................................................................. 38

97

1.



 

Claims for IVD Companion Diagnostics Based on Use in Trial ...................... 38

98

H.

 



Postmarketing Considerations .................................................................................... 40

99

APPENDIX 1: Critical Points of the Codevelopment Process ............................................... 41



100

APPENDIX 2: Subject Specimen Handling Considerations .................................................. 43

101

APPENDIX 3: BIMO Information to Submit in a PMA ........................................................ 46



102

APPENDIX 4: Letters of Authorization ................................................................................. 47

103


Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 

Draft - Not for Implementation 

 

 



Principles for Codevelopment of an In 

104


Vitro Companion Diagnostic Device 

105


with a Therapeutic Product 

106


107

108


Draft Guidance for Industry and  

109


Food and Drug Administration Staff  

110


111

112


This draft guidance, when finalized, will represent the current thinking of the Food and 

113


Drug Administration (FDA) on this topic.  It does not establish any rights for or on any 

114


person and is not binding on FDA or the public.  You can use an alternative approach if it 

115


satisfies the requirements of the applicable statutes and regulations.  To discuss an 

116


alternative approach, contact the FDA staff or Office responsible for implementing this 

117


guidance as listed on the title page.   

118


119

I. Introduction  

120

An in vitro companion diagnostic device (hereafter referred to as an “IVD companion 



121

diagnostic”) is an in vitro diagnostic device

1

 (IVD) that provides information that is essential 



122

for the safe and effective use of a corresponding therapeutic product.

2

  As described in the 



123

FDA guidance entitled “In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices,”

3

 in most circumstances, 



124

                                                 

1

 Per 21 CFR 809.3(a), in vitro diagnostic devices (IVDs) are “those reagents, instruments, and systems 



intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, including a determination of the state of health, 

in order to cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease or its sequelae.  Such products are intended for use in the 

collection, preparation, and examination of specimens taken from the human body.”  IVDs “are devices … and 

may also be biological products subject to section 351 of the Public Health Service Act.”  21 CFR 809.3(a).  

This guidance does not address IVDs regulated under section 351 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 

262).


 

2

 As used in this guidance, therapeutic product includes therapeutic, preventive, and prophylactic drugs and 



biological products.  Although this guidance does not expressly address therapeutic devices intended for use 

with in vitro diagnostics, the principles discussed in this guidance may also be relevant to such devices. 

 

3

 FDA defined the term “IVD companion diagnostic device” and described certain regulatory requirements in 



the guidance entitled “In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices” 

(http://www.fda.gov/downloads/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/GuidanceDocuments/UCM26

2327.pdf).  This guidance also states that FDA expects that most therapeutic product and IVD companion 

diagnostic device pairs will not meet the definition of “combination product” under 21 CFR 3.2(e).  FDA 

 


Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 

Draft - Not for Implementation 

 

 



an IVD companion diagnostic should be approved, granted a de novo request or cleared by 

125


FDA contemporaneously with the approval of the corresponding therapeutic product for the 

126


use indicated in the therapeutic product labeling.

4

   



127

128


This guidance document is intended to be a practical guide to assist therapeutic product 

129


sponsors and IVD sponsors in developing a therapeutic product and an accompanying IVD 

130


companion diagnostic, a process referred to as codevelopment.

5

  This guidance is also 



131

intended to assist FDA staff participating in the review of candidate IVD companion 

132

diagnostics



6

 or their associated therapeutic products. 

133

134


This guidance describes: general principles to guide codevelopment to support obtaining 

135


contemporaneous marketing authorization for a therapeutic product and its corresponding 

136


IVD companion diagnostic, certain regulatory requirements that sponsors should be aware of 

137


as they develop such products, considerations for planning and executing a therapeutic 

138


product clinical trial that also includes the investigation of an IVD companion diagnostic, and 

139


administrative issues in the submission process for the therapeutic product and IVD 

140


companion diagnostic. 

141


142

Although this guidance focuses on IVD companion diagnostics, many of the principles 

143

discussed may also be relevant to the codevelopment of therapeutic products with IVDs that 



144

do not meet the definition of an IVD companion diagnostic but that are nonetheless 

145

beneficial for therapeutic product development or clinical decision making.  Likewise, the 



146

principles discussed in this guidance may be useful even if codevelopment is not planned 

147

from the start of a therapeutic product’s development (e.g., the potential benefit of an IVD is 



148

not established until later in the therapeutic product’s development lifecycle). 

149

150


FDA’s guidance documents, including this guidance, do not establish legally enforceable 

151


requirements.  Instead, guidances describe the Agency’s current thinking on a topic and 

152


should be viewed as recommendations, unless specific regulatory or statutory requirements 

153


are cited.  The use of the word “should” in Agency guidances means that something is 

154


suggested or recommended, but not required.  

155


                                                                                                                                                       

updates guidance documents periodically.  To make sure you have the most recent version of a guidance, check 

the FDA website: http://www.fda.gov/RegulatoryInformation/Guidances/default.htm. 

 

4



 In FDA’s experience IVD companion diagnostics have generally been high-risk, Class III devices, which 

require FDA approval of a premarket approval application (PMA); however, FDA recognizes the possibility of 

a moderate-risk IVD companion diagnostic (i.e., Class II device), which would require clearance of a 510(k) 

premarket notification or grant of a de novo request.  Thus, in the context of this guidance document, the term 

“contemporaneous marketing authorization(s)” refers to the approval of a therapeutic product 

contemporaneously with the clearance, grant of de novo, or approval (as appropriate) of the associated IVD 

companion diagnostic, where the appropriate premarket review standard(s) for each product has been met.  

 

5



 For the purposes of this document, the term codevelopment is used in reference to the development of a 

therapeutic product and an IVD companion diagnostic that is essential for the safe and effective use of the 

therapeutic product.  Note that codevelopment more generally may refer to any development of a therapeutic 

product with an IVD.

 

6

 For the purposes of this document, the term candidate IVD companion diagnostic is used to refer to an IVD 



that the sponsor(s) believes is necessary to support the safe and effective use of the corresponding therapeutic 

product and is the version of the IVD that will be reviewed by FDA in a premarket submission. 



Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 

Draft - Not for Implementation 

 

 



II. Background 

156


The concept of codevelopment of a therapeutic product and an IVD companion diagnostic 

157


was first applied when the therapeutic product trastuzumab (Herceptin) was paired with an 

158


immunohistochemical IVD companion diagnostic (HercepTest™) that measures expression 

159


levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2; also known as ERBB2) in 

160


breast cancer tissue and identifies patients more likely to have a therapeutic response.  These 

161


two products were approved in 1998.  Since that time, interest in identifying biomarkers that 

162


could be used as biological targets for therapeutic product development, prognostic 

163


indicators, or predictors of patient response to specific therapeutic products has grown 

164


tremendously.  There are now numerous examples of therapeutic products with an 

165


accompanying IVD companion diagnostic.

7

   



166

167


As stated in the FDA guidance entitled “In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices,”

8

 IVD 



168

companion diagnostics are, by definition, essential for the safe and effective use of a 

169

corresponding therapeutic product and may be used to: 1) identify patients who are most 



170

likely to benefit from the therapeutic product; 2) identify patients likely to be at increased 

171

risk for serious adverse reactions as a result of treatment with the therapeutic product; 3) 



172

monitor response to treatment with the therapeutic product for the purpose of adjusting 

173

treatment (e.g., schedule, dose, discontinuation) to achieve improved safety or effectiveness



174

or 4) identify patients in the population for whom the therapeutic product has been 

175

adequately studied and found to be safe and effective (i.e., there is insufficient information 



176

about the safety and effectiveness of the therapeutic product in any other population).

9

  

177



178

If an IVD companion diagnostic is essential to assuring safety or effectiveness of the 

179

therapeutic product, FDA generally will not approve the therapeutic product or new 



180

indication for a therapeutic product if the IVD companion diagnostic does not already 

181

have marketing authorization or will not receive contemporaneous marketing 



182

authorization for use with that therapeutic product for that indication.  In certain 

183

circumstances



 

(i.e., when a therapeutic product is intended to treat a serious or life-

184

threatening condition for which no satisfactory available therapy exists or when the 



185

labeling of an approved therapeutic product needs to be revised to address a serious 

186

safety issue), however, FDA may approve a therapeutic product 



without the prior or 

187


contemporaneous marketing authorization of an IVD companion diagnostic,

10

 



regardless of 

188


whether the IVD companion diagnostic and the therapeutic product are developed by a 

189


single sponsor or are independently developed by different sponsors.   

190


191

Codevelopment of IVD companion diagnostics and therapeutic products is critical to the 

192

advancement of precision medicine.  FDA seeks to facilitate innovations in precision 



193

medicine by providing sponsors with a set of principles that may be helpful for effective 

194

                                                 



7

 See current list of IVD companion diagnostics (

www.fda.gov/companiondiagnostics

).

 



8

 See note 3.

 

9

 See note 3. 



10

 See FDA guidance on “In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices,” note 3, for further details.  

 


Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 

Draft - Not for Implementation 

 

 



codevelopment and in fulfilling FDA’s applicable regulatory requirements.

11

  This guidance 



195

outlines fundamental principles that have been developed to assist sponsors in 

196

codevelopment.   



197

III. Principles of the Codevelopment Process 

198

Therapeutic products and IVDs typically are developed on different schedules, are subject to 



199

different regulatory requirements,

12

 and have different points of interaction with the 



200

appropriate review centers at FDA.

13

  The merging of the two development processes to 



201

facilitate the contemporaneous marketing authorization of a therapeutic product and its 

202

corresponding IVD companion diagnostic requires that the sponsors of both products have a 



203

general understanding of both processes.  

204

205


Sponsors of therapeutic product development programs and their IVD partners face a range 

206


of issues when launching a codevelopment program.  There are often questions related to use 

207


of the investigational IVD

14

 in a therapeutic product clinical trial and how the goals of the 



208

therapeutic product development program are dependent on the IVD.  This section describes 

209

many of the factors that sponsors should anticipate and plan for in the codevelopment process 



210

and makes recommendations for both therapeutic product and IVD sponsors to facilitate their 

211

obtaining contemporaneous marketing authorizations.  



212

213


Various approaches may be acceptable to obtain the data needed to support contemporaneous 

214


marketing authorization of a therapeutic product and the accompanying IVD companion 

215


diagnostic.  Because many novel or complex issues can be raised by including an 

216


investigational IVD in therapeutic product clinical trial design, FDA strongly recommends 

217


that the sponsors of both the therapeutic product and the IVD meet with the appropriate FDA 

218


review centers prior to launching a trial intended to advance the development of the 

219


therapeutic product and the IVD companion diagnostic.  Whenever appropriate, both 

220


sponsors should be present at meetings with the review centers responsible for the 

221


therapeutic product and the IVD, so that each sponsor is clearly informed about the Agency’s 

222


thinking on both products.  Sponsors are responsible for providing timely information to the 

223


                                                 

11

 Applications for an IVD companion diagnostic and its corresponding therapeutic product will be reviewed 



and approved according to applicable regulatory requirements.  The IVD companion diagnostic application will 

be reviewed and approved, granted a de novo request or cleared under the device authorities of the Federal 

Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) and relevant medical device regulations; the therapeutic product 

application will be reviewed and approved under section 505 of the FD&C Act (for drug products) or section 

351 of the Public Health Service Act (for biological products) and relevant drug and biological product 

regulations.  

 

12

 See note 11.



 

13

 Therapeutic products are reviewed by FDA in either the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research 



(CBER) or the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER).  IVDs are medical devices reviewed by 

CBER or the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH).  CDRH reviews the great majority of IVD 

submissions.  CBER reviews human leukocyte antigen (HLA) test kits and diagnostic tests for human 

immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV).  CBER also reviews IVDs used in 

blood and tissue donation and administration practices, including compatibility tests.  

 

14



 Investigational IVDs and applicable regulatory requirements are described in Section III.B of this document.

 


Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 

Draft - Not for Implementation 

 

 



appropriate review centers to enable an efficient review process and to support obtaining 

224


contemporaneous marketing authorizations. 

225


Yüklə 0,62 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə