Pathogenesis of Rubella and Congenital Rubella Dr Jenny Best



Yüklə 45,75 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix20.02.2017
ölçüsü45,75 Kb.
#9152

Pathogenesis of Rubella and 

Congenital Rubella 

Dr Jenny Best 

Emeritus Reader in Virology 

King’s College London. 

2012 


Pathogenesis of Primary Infection 

• Spread by droplet from URT (7 d before – 

7-10 d after onset of rash). 

• High concs of virus. 

• Incubation period 14 days (range 12-21) 

• Virus replication in buccal mucosa and 

lymphoid tissue. 

• Spread via lymphatic system leading to 

viraemia and systemic infection. 


Neut. & HAI antibody 

 

SRH antibody 



 

Specific IgG (EIA) 

 

Specific IgM (EIA) 



Pharynx 

 

Blood 



 

Stool 


 

Urine 


Rash 

 

Fever 



 

Arthralgia 

 

Lymphadenopathy 



Se

rol

ogy

 

Vi

rus 

Is

ol

ati

on

 

C

linical 

Fe

at

ur

es

 

Days after exposure 

 2        4       6       8      10     12     14      16      18       20      22      24       26       28     30 

 2        4      6       8      10      12      14       16     18      20      22      24       26     28      30 

39



 

38



  

37



 

Relation between clinical and virological features of postnatally acquired rubella.   

  Rubella 

rash 

Rubella rash  

• First on face and spreads down 

• Maculo-papular, lesions may coalesce. 

• Usually lasts  ≤ 3 days and may be fleeting. 

• Pinpoint enanthem on soft palate sometimes 

 


Pathogenesis of rubella rash 

• Not fully understood. 

• Rubella virus (RV) is present in the skin. 

• Immune mechanisms may be responsible. 

 


Joint symptoms (1) 

• Most common in post-pubertal females (≤ 

70%) 

• Arthralgia or arthritis for 3-4 days, 



occasionally up to 1 month. 

• RV may persist in the synovium. 

• RV antibodies detected in synovial fluid. 

• Immune complexes may be responsible 

(CIC in serum from vaccinees     ). 


Joint symptoms (2) 

• Hormonal factors – high incidence in 

females and assoc with menstrual cycle. 

• No convincing evidence for association 

with chronic joint disease. 


Immune responses 

• IgG and IgM used for diagnosis. 

• IgG (predom IgG1), IgM, IgA and sec IgA. 

• CMI – lymphoproliferative responses a few 

days after rash.  Mixed Th1/Th2 response.  

• Mild, transient immunosuppression. 

 


Child with a Congenital 

Rubella Cataract 

• This child is 9 months 

old. 

• A cataract in the other 



eye was surgically 

removed. 

• Cataracts may develop 

following maternal 

rubella in 1

st

 12 weeks 



of pregnancy. 

• Thrombocytopenic 

purpura in 

congenital rubella. 

  (1964, USA.  From 



Banatvala & Best). 

Some Common Manifestations 

of Congenital Rubella (1) 

   


  Permanent 

• Cataract 

• Retinopathy 

• Sensorineural deafness 

• Heart defects 

• Microphthalmia 

• Microcephaly 

   


  Transient 

• Low birth weight 

• Hepatosplenomegaly 

• Meningoencephalitis 

• Thrombocytopenic 

purpura 


• Bone lesions 

Some Common Manifestations 

of Congenital Rubella (2) 

• Developmental 

• Sensorineural deafness 

• Peripheral pulmonary stenosis 

• Mental retardation 

• Central language defects 

• Diabetes mellitus 


Pathogenesis of Congenital 

Rubella 

 

• Most damage is during the period of 



organogenesis. 

• Persistence of RV 

 delayed manifestations 



 

   

   


Histological studies  

(Töndury & Smith 1966) 

 

• Foci of damage in the chorion, desquamated 



cells enter the fetal circulation. 

• Damage to endothelial cells  

    


haemorrhages   

 tissue necrosis. 



• Obstructive lesions in arteries. 

• Tissue necrosis 

• No inflammatory response 

 


Congenitally-acquired Rubella 

Persistence of Virus 

Site 

Age (yrs) 

Reference 

Lens 


Menser et al. 1967 

Thyroid* 

Ziring et al. 1977 



Brain† 

12 


Weil et al. 1975 

Cremer et al. 1975 

* Hashimoto’s disease 

† 

Cases of panencephalitis 



Congenital rubella: immune 

responses 

• Impairment of CMI responses – allows clones of 

RV to persist. 

• Specific IgG, IgA and IgM are produced, but 

antibody titres may fall rapidly in some affected 

children. 

• May lack antibodies to C, have weak response to 

E2 and weak response to E1 compared with 

adults. 

• T-cell lines fail to respond to certain RV E1 

peptides. 

•  Suggests selective immune tolerance to E1.   



RV-induced changes observed in 

cell cultures (1) 

• Retardation in cell division – mitotic 

inhibition – may be due to disruption of 

actin filaments (cytoskeleton). 

• Apoptosis 


Rubella Virus CPE in RK13 Cells is 

due to Apoptosis



Pathogenesis of Congenital 

Rubella 

• Apoptosis of essential cells. 

• No apoptosis in fetal fibroblasts, may allow 

RV to persist. 



RV-induced changes observed in 

cell cultures (2) 

• RV may disrupt normal cell growth: NSP 

p90 interacts with pRB & pCK. 

• Disturbance of signalling pathways that 

control cell differentiation, proliferation and 

survival. 

• RV replication may be limited by interferon 

&/or DI RNAs. 

 


CRS and IDDM (1) 

• RV isolated from pancreas of infants with CRS

• RV-induced damage to islet cells, but not 



cytolytic. 

• Depression of immunoreactive secreted insulin. 

• RV capsid shares epitopes with β-cell protein

• Autoantibodies to islet cells in 20% patients in 2



nd

 

decade. 



• Genetic susceptibility (↑ HLA DR3 ↓DR2). 

Conclusions 

• IDDM may be caused by an autoimmune 

reaction or direct damage caused by persisting 

virus. 


• The mechanisms by which RV interferes with 

normal cell growth are of considerable interest. 

• More research is required to elucidate the 

mechanisms by which RV causes fetal 

damage. 


 

Rubella 

Cell mediated immune responses (1) 

• Decrease in total leucocytes, neutrophils 

and T cells. 

• Transient depression of lymphocyte 

responsiveness and DTH to mitogens and 

antigens. 

• Specific lymphoproliferative responses 

develop rapidly and persist for many years. 



Rubella 

Cell mediated immune responses (2) 

• Proliferative responses in adults are 

influenced by selected HLA-DR antigens. 

• CD4+ MHC class II restricted and CD8+ 

class I restricted T-cell responses are 

observed. 



Interference with the cell cycle 

• NSP P90 interacts with pRB and pCK. 

• pRB, retinoblastoma protein is a cell cycle 

regulatory protein. 

• pCK, citron-K kinase protein, a cytokinesis 

regulatory protein. 

 


Cell survival signaling pathways 

• Studies in RK13 cells. 

• Inhibition of PI3K-Akt signaling reduced 

cell viability and increased Rv apoptosis. 

• Inhibition of Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK pathway 

impaired RV replication and growth. 



 

    


Cooray et al. Virology Journal 2005. 


Yüklə 45,75 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə