Military Medicine International Journal of amsus raising the bar: extremity trauma care guest editors



Yüklə 2,47 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/20
tarix14.01.2017
ölçüsü2,47 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20

Military Medicine

International Journal of AMSUS

RAISING THE BAR: EXTREMITY TRAUMA CARE

GUEST EDITORS

Fred A. Cecere, MD

Steven J. Stanhope, PhD

Kenton R. Kaufman, PhD

Bill W. Oldham, MBA

COL John C. Shero, MS USA (Ret)

COL James A. Mundy, MS USA (Ret)

SPECIAL ISSUE – Supplement to Military Medicine, Volume 181, Number 11/12

November/December 2016


 Raising the Bar: Extremity Trauma Care

“Raising the Bar” in Extremity Trauma Care: A Story of Collaboration and Innovation 

1

Fred A. Cecere, Bill W. Oldham



The Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence: Overview of the Research and 

Surveillance Division 

Christopher A. Rábago, Mary Clouser, Christopher L. Dearth, Shawn Farrokhi, Michael R. Galarneau, 

M. Jason Highsmith, Jason M. Wilken, Marilynn P. Wyatt, Owen T. Hill

The Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation (BADER) Consortium: 

Reaching in Partnership for Optimal Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Outcomes 

13

Steven J. Stanhope, Jason M. Wilken, Alison L. Pruziner, Christopher L. Dearth, Marilynn Wyatt, Gregg W. Ziemke, 

Rachel Strickland, Suzanne A. Milbourne, Kenton R. Kaufman

The Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research: Advancing the Rehabilitative Care for 

Service Members With Complex Trauma 

20

Brad M. Isaacson, Brad D. Hendershot, Seth D. Messinger, Jason M. Wilken, Christopher A. Rábago, 

Elizabeth Russell Esposito, Erik Wolf, Alison L. Pruziner, Christopher L. Dearth, Marilynn Wyatt, Steven P. Cohen, 

Jack W. Tsao, Paul F. Pasquina



Improving Outcomes Following Extremity Trauma: The Need for a Multidisciplinary Approach 

26

Daniel J. Stinner



The Prevalence of Gait Deviations in Individuals With Transtibial Amputation 

30

Christopher A. Rábago, Jason M. Wilken



A Narrative Review of the Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated With Development of Knee 

Osteoarthritis After Traumatic Unilateral Lower Limb Amputation 

38

Shawn Farrokhi, Brittney Mazzone, Adam Yoder, Kristina Grant, Marilynn Wyatt



Differences in Military Obstacle Course Performance Between Three Energy-Storing and 

Shock-Adapting Prosthetic Feet in High-Functioning Transtibial Amputees: A Double-Blind

Randomized Control Trial 

45

M. Jason Highsmith, Jason T. Kahle, Rebecca M. Miro, Derek J. Lura, Stephanie L. Carey, Matthew M. Wernke, 

Seok Hun Kim, William S. Quillen

Functional Outcomes of Service Members With Bilateral Transfemoral and Knee 

Disarticulation Amputations Resulting From Trauma 

55

Barri L. Schnall, Yin-Ting Chen, Elizabeth M. Bell, Erik J. Wolf, Jason M. Wilken



Core Temperature in Service Members With and Without Traumatic Amputations During a 

Prolonged Endurance Event 

61

Anne M. Andrews, Christina Deehl, Reva L. Rogers, Alison L. Pruziner



A Review of Unique Considerations for Female Veterans With Amputation 

66

Billie J. Randolph, Leif M. Nelson, M. Jason Highsmith



Outcomes Associated With the Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis (IDEO): A Systematic 

Review of the Literature 

69

M. Jason Highsmith, Leif M. Nelson, Neil T. Carbone, Tyler D. Klenow, Jason T. Kahle, Owen T. Hill, SP USA, 

Jason T. Maikos, Mike S. Kartel, Billie J. Randolph

Descriptive Characteristics and Amputation Rates With Use of Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeleton 

Orthosis 

77

Owen Hill, Lakmini Bulathsinhala, Susan L. Eskridge, Kimberly Quinn, Daniel J. Stinner

VOLUME 181 

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016 

SUPPLEMENT

M

ILITARY

 M

EDICINE

AMSUS - The Society of Federal Health Professionals should not be held responsible for statements made in its publication by contributors or advertisers. 

Therefore, the articles reported in this supplement to MILITARY MEDICINE do not necessarily refl ect the endorsement, offi cial attitude, or position of AMSUS or

the Editorial Board.



The Thought Leadership Institute, BADER Consortium, the Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research 

(CRSR), and the Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE) wish to acknowledge 

the efforts of the following people in the coordination of this supplement: 

Kelly Bothum

 

Elizabeth Russell Esposito



Jeremy G. Johnson

Michelle Mattera Keon

Maria Pellicone

Christopher A. Rabago

Rachel A. Strickland


MILITARY MEDICINE, 181, 11/12:1, 2016

“Raising the Bar” in Extremity Trauma Care:

A Story of Collaboration and Innovation

Fred A. Cecere, MD; Bill W. Oldham, MBA

Today

’s military health system is working in remarkable



ways to provide complex extremity trauma care that helps

injured service members reach their highest level of function.

The difference in outcomes as a result is staggering. In the

1980s, only 2% of soldiers remained on active duty following

limb loss, despite relatively minor injuries such as a partial

hand amputation.

1

By 2010, 19% of service members



remained on active duty after suffering limb loss caused by

major extremity trauma. About 25% of this group actually

returned to theater, even though their injuries were much

more devastating than those suffered during previous con

flicts.

2

Wounded soldiers now have access to cutting-edge tech-



nologies, multidisciplinary care, and research efforts aimed

at realizing optimal outcomes for a population already used

to performing at high levels. The approach is holistic and

family centered, focusing more on the patient

’s ability than

disability. Best of all, advances in the care of these patients

offer bene

fits to other injured service members as well as the

civilian population.

This work is possible because of the synergies that exist

between programs operating through the Department of

Defense (DoD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

(VA) across the patient care spectrum. The result is comple-

mentary rather than competing care that begins at the point

of injury and continues for the rest of a patient

’s life.


Efforts to cultivate this collaborative approach to ortho-

pedic rehabilitation care have been bolstered by three sepa-

rate but interconnected programs that have identi

fied and


developed critical research capabilities and infrastructures

that translate research advances into clinical care for patients

with traumatic extremity injuries.

The Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excel-

lence (EACE) was created by Congressional mandate as a

joint enterprise between the DoD and the VA to develop a

comprehensive strategy to help service members with trau-

matic injuries optimize their quality of life.

The Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research (CRSR)

was established to advance the rehabilitative care for service

members with combat-related injuries while also educating

the next generation of military medicine professionals.

The Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional

Rehabilitation (BADER) Consortium was developed as

a research capacity building program to further establish

research infrastructures and investigators at DoD and VA sites

and to launch a series of multiteam clinical research initiatives.

These programs operate independently, but they are

designed to be interdisciplinary and collaborative in nature.

This complementary approach is re

flective of the efforts by

the DoD to address the complex health needs of the combat

wounded before they reach the VA, which has already had

an established amputee and rehabilitation science program.

Together, they provide a unique opportunity to strengthen

DoD/VA research programs and in

fluence the long-term

direction of care for this unique patient population.

It is an approach that is working, as evidenced by a 2015

report by the Defense Health Board on the sustainment and

advancement of amputee care.

3

It found that the DoD is



“leading the Nation and the world in extremity trauma and

amputee science and care through its infrastructure, systems

and approach.

” That same report also reiterated the need

for collaborations between institutions, practitioners, and

researchers across disciplines and organizations in order to

sustain these advancements.

Whether it is team members from the EACE and the

BADER Consortium embedding at military treatment facilities

(MTFs) to help answer clinically relevant questions and support

research in high-priority areas or CRSR staff working to

de

fine and validate rehabilitation strategies for injured service



members,

the focus

remains

constant


—to help these

wounded warriors get back to the life they were living

before their traumatic injuries.

By working collaboratively, researchers do not have to

give up their autonomy. Indeed, each domain of rehabilita-

tion care can and should be able to work independently.

The resultant creativity and energy is evidenced by the

myriad of research projects already underway at MTFs and

VA centers around the country. These researchers are not

constrained by working toward the same goal

—helping

patients regain their highest functional levels

—but rather,

they are empowered to meet those goals in different ways.

One project funded by the Defense Medical Research and

Development Program and supported by the EACE and

BADER focused on preventing falls in service members

with amputations through the use of advanced rehabilitation

training.

4

At CRSR, they are



finding improvements in pain

management strategies that can improve the quality of life

for patients with severe combat injuries. The BADER Con-

sortium supports the goal of optimal outcomes by providing

needed administrative assistance and infrastructure support

to help address important gaps in clinical orthopedic rehabil-

itation research and patient care.

Thought Leadership and Innovation Foundation, 16775 Whirlaway

Court, Leesburg, VA 20176.

doi: 10.7205/MILMED-D-16-00314

MILITARY MEDICINE, Vol. 181, November/December Supplement 2016

1


MTFs and VA medical centers are uniquely positioned to

undertake this mission of restoring function. The networks

that already exist at these facilities enable the orderly adop-

tion of cutting-edge technological devices and associated

rehabilitation techniques to enhance patient function.

These advances are being developed, tested, and evalu-

ated by the same high-performing, motivated population

most likely to bene

fit from them. In this capacity, the MTFs

and VA medical centers can serve as the nation

’s premiere

translational and clinical trial network for traumatic amputee

rehabilitation, offering possibilities for personalized care and

optimal function of these devices.

Microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees offer tangible

examples of how injured service members are getting access

to cutting-edge care, but it is providing these devices with a

well-designed rehabilitation program that truly offers the

opportunity for patients to return to their busy lives and

work, thereby making the goal of optimizing outcomes a

reality. The Return-to-Run program pioneered at the Center

for the Intrepid is one example of coupling high-tech with

rehabilitation, resulting in long-term improvements in physi-

cal performance, pain- and patient-reported outcomes.

In the same vein, research has found that the body, mind,

and spirit should be jointly considered following traumatic

injuries. The Military Extremity Trauma Amputation/Limb

Salvage study

5

showed that service members who underwent



amputation rather than limb salvage returned to full activity

and had a lower likelihood of post-traumatic stress disorder.

There was a time when simply helping a patient regain

some aspect of mobility was considered a success. But this

generation of injured service members has more demanding

medical and interpersonal needs than previous cohorts.

These young men and women typically lived highly active

and athletic lifestyles before their injuries. They want to

return to their busy lives, whether it is through the use of

prosthetic and orthotic devices that help them regain their

mobility or specialized rehabilitation training that helps them

adapt to changing terrains.

The needs of this unique population have spurred many

stunning advancements in patient care over the past 15 years.

It is why programs like the EACE, CRSR, and BADER have

been able to thrive in a relatively short amount of time.

Much is still not known about the challenges injured ser-

vice members will face in the future. Many of these patients

are young, but so are the programs providing the resources

to support these critical research efforts. These heroes, who

face lifelong adaptations to the rigors of the world, need

continued and dedicated teams of specialists trained in their

unique challenges. As the research into these areas faces

greater challenges, it is important for the centers and the col-

laborations to be allowed to grow and mature.

In the coming years, there needs to be an increased effort

to develop research enterprises that will wield the greatest

impact on current and future limb loss partners. Great

research advances have been made during the recent 15 years

of con


flicts, but it is critical that these successes be sustained

in peacetime.

3

Vagaries of combat



—along with the fluctuations in the

number of patients with traumatic extremity injuries who

require care

—present funding and staffing challenges that

could threaten medical advancements and treatment break-

throughs in the future. Only when clinicians and researchers

work together

—along with the DoD and VA leadership—to

develop programs and research capabilities with the greatest

potential for impacting our wounded will these challenges

be overcome.

It is through this larger coordination of effort we can

ensure military health professionals will continue to raise the

bar in the development and implementation of a new normal

where service members who have experienced all kinds of

extremity trauma can achieve their highest level of function

and enjoy a better quality of life.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This work was funded by Congressionally Directed Medical Research Pro-

grams (CDMRPs), Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program (PRORP)

via award number W81XWH-11-2-0222; the NIH-NIGMS (P20 GM103446);

the NIH-NICHD through a collaboration agreement; and the University of

Delaware, College of Health Sciences.

REFERENCES

1. Kishbaugh D, Dillingham TR, Howard RS, Sinnott MW, Belandres PV:

Amputee soldiers and their return to active duty. Mil Med 1995; 160(2):

82

–4.


2. Stinner DJ, Burns TC, Kirk KL, Ficke JR: Return to duty rate of ampu-

tee soldiers in the current con

flicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. J Trauma

2010; 68(6): 1476

–9.

3. Defense Health Board Reports. Sustainment and advancement of ampu-



tee care

—April 8, 2015. Available at http://www.health.mil/About-

MHS/Other-MHS-Organizations/Defense-Health-Board/Reports; accessed

August 19, 2016.

4. Kaufman KR, Wyatt MP, Sessoms PH, Grabiner MD: Task-speci

fic fall


prevention training is effective for war

fighters with transtibial amputa-

tions. Clin Orthop Relat Res 2014; 472: 3076

–84.


5. Doukas WC, Hayda RA, Frisch M, et al: The Military Extremity Trauma

Amputation/Limb Salvage (METALS) study: outcomes of amputation

versus limb salvage following major lower-extremity trauma. J Bone

Joint Surg Am 2013; 95(2): 138

–45.

MILITARY MEDICINE, Vol. 181, November/December Supplement 2016



2

“Raising the Bar” in Extremity Trauma Care



MILITARY MEDICINE, 181, 11/12:3, 2016

The Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence:

Overview of the Research and Surveillance Division

Christopher A. Rábago, PT, PhD*†; Mary Clouser, PhD*‡; Christopher L. Dearth, PhD*§;

Shawn Farrokhi, PT, PhD*∥; Michael R. Galarneau, MS, EMT*‡; CPT M. Jason Highsmith, SP USAR*¶**††;

Jason M. Wilken, PT, PhD*†; Marilynn P. Wyatt, PT, MA∥; LTC Owen T. Hill, SP USA*†

ABSTRACT Congress authorized creation of the Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE)

as part of the 2009 National Defense Authorization Act. The legislation mandated the Department of Defense (DoD)

and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to implement a comprehensive plan and strategy for the mitigation, treat-

ment, and rehabilitation of traumatic extremity injuries and amputation. The EACE also was tasked with conducting

clinically relevant research, fostering collaborations, and building partnerships across multidisciplinary international,

federal, and academic networks to optimize the quality of life of service members and veterans who have sustained

extremity trauma or amputations. To ful

fill the mandate to conduct research, the EACE developed a Research and Surveillance

Division that complements and collaborates with outstanding DoD, VA, and academic research programs across

the globe. The EACE researchers have efforts in four key research focus areas relevant to extremity trauma and

amputation: (1) Novel Rehabilitation Interventions, (2) Advanced Prosthetic and Orthotic Technologies, (3) Epidemiology

and Surveillance, and (4) Medical and Surgical Innovations. This overview describes the EACE efforts to innovate,

discover, and translate knowledge gleaned from collaborative research partnerships into clinical practice and policy.

INTRODUCTION

In 2009, Congress legislated the creation of the Extremity

Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE) as a

joint enterprise between the Department of Defense (DoD)

and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to optimize the

quality of life (QoL) of service members and veterans who

sustain extremity trauma or amputation.

1

Congress directed



the EACE to implement a comprehensive plan and strategy,

conduct clinically relevant research, foster collaborations, and

build partnerships across multidisciplinary international,

federal, and academic networks. In accordance with this

mandate, the EACE

’s mission is focused on the mitigation,

treatment, and rehabilitation of traumatic extremity injuries and

amputations. The purpose of this editorial is to provide an over-

view of the EACE efforts to innovate, discover, and translate

knowledge gleaned from collaborative research partnerships

across established DoD, VA, and academic research programs.

BACKGROUND

At the time of the

first EACE staff hire in September 2011,

the U.S. military was engaged in nearly 10 years of continu-

ous combat. As of October 1, 2015, data compiled from the

Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database, Naval Health

Research Center, indicate that approximately 26,000 trau-

matic extremity injuries resulted from deployments during

Operations Enduring Freedom (OEF), Iraqi Freedom, (OIF)

and New Dawn (OND). These injuries ranged in severity and

complexity, with nearly 50% involving the lower limbs.

2

From 2001 to 2015, 1,687 individuals with major limb ampu-



tations from OIF, OEF, and OND were documented in the

EACE Amputee Registry. Of these individuals, 69% suffered

a single limb loss injury and 31% lost multiple limbs. The over-

all incidence of extremity injuries from these operations is

consistent with previous wars, comprising more than half of

all combat wounds.

2

With extremity injuries sharply rising early in the con



flicts,

leadership within the DoD and VA health care systems

realized the need for specialized systems of care that could

deliver concentrated, interdisciplinary health care required by

*Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence, 2748 Worth

Road, Suite 29, Joint Base San Antonio Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234.

†Center for the Intrepid, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Brooke

Army Medical Center, 3551 Roger Brooke Drive, Joint Base San Antonio

Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234.

‡Naval Health Research Center, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego,

CA 92106.

§Research and Development Section, Department of Rehabilitation,

Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda,

MD 20889.

∥The Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Naval Medical

Center San Diego, 34800 Bob Wilson Drive, San Diego, CA 92134.

¶James A. Haley Veterans Administration Hospital, Center of Innovation

in Disabilities and Rehabilitation Research, 8900 Grand Oak Circle (151R),

Tampa, FL 33637.

**University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, School of

Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences. 3515 E. Fletcher Avenue,

Tampa, FL 33612.

††U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation and Prosthetics

Services, 810 Vermont Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20420.

The view(s) expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not

re

flect the official policy or position of Brooke Army Medical Center,




Yüklə 2,47 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə