International Journal of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Vol. 4(4), pp. 52-58, March 2012



Yüklə 328,15 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix02.09.2017
ölçüsü328,15 Kb.

International Journal of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Vol. 4(4), pp. 52-58, March 2012 

Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/IJPPB 

DOI: 10.5897/IJPPB11.032 

ISSN-2141-2162 ©2012 Academic Journals

 

 

 



 

 

 



Full Length Research Paper

 

 



Ecophysiological responses of Melaleuca species to 

dual stresses of water logging and salinity 

 

Nurul Aini

1

*, Emmanuel Mapfumo

2

, Zed Rengel

2

 and Caixian Tang

3

 

 

1



Agriculture Faculty, University of Brawijaya, Malang, Indonesia. 

2

Soil Science and Plant Nutrition (M087), School of Earth and Geographical Sciences, University of Western Australia, 



Crawley 6009. 

3

Department of Agricultural Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora Vic 3086, Australia. 



 

Accepted 18 February, 2012 



 

The  combined  effects  of  salinity  and  water  logging  on growth  and  ecophysiological  characteristics of 

three  Melaleuca  species  were  investigated  in  a  glasshouse  study.  Salinity  treatments  were  imposed 

from day 28 at 0.3, 0.8, 2 and 5 g NaCl kg

-1

 soil. Shoot Na

+

 concentration and Na

+

/K

+

 ratio for M. thyiodes 

at all salt level and of M. nesophila at 5.0 g NaCl kg

-1

 were higher under waterlogged as compared with 

non-waterlogged  conditions.  The  concentration  of  Cl

-

  was  double  in  M.  thyiodes  and  M.  nesophila 

shoots  after  2  weeks  of  water  logging  at  5  g  NaCl  kg

-1

  soil,  but  not  in  M.  halmaturorum.  Final  dry 

weights  of  shoots  and  roots  of  the  three  Melaleuca  species  decreased  with  increased  salinity  levels. 

Shoot dry weight of plants grown at 5.0 g NaCl kg

-1

 soil decreased to 30, 50 and 11% of those achieved 

at  0.3  g  NaCl  kg

-1

  soil  for  M.  halmaturorum,  M.  thyoides,  and  M.  nesophila,  respectively.  The  results 

indicated different salinity resistance within Melaleuca species.  

 

Key words: Sodium, potassium, chloride, Na

+

/K



+

 ratio, water logging. 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 



 

Soil  salinity  is  an  important  constraint  on  plant  growth. 

Negative  effect  of  salinity    on  plant  growth  is  due  to  the 

direct  toxic  effects  of  ions  and  osmotic  stress  that  may 

hamper  a  range  of  physiological  and  biochemical  pro-

cesses  in  plants  (Al-Karaki,  2000;  Munns,  2002;  Barrett-

Lennard,  2003;  Ashraf  and  Harris,  2004;  Munns,  et  al., 

2006). Salinity can directly affect plant uptake of nutrients 

and  may  cause  nutrient  imbalances,  due  to  the 

competion of  Na

+

 and Cl


-

 with other nutrients such as K

+



Ca



2+

,  and  NO

3

-

  (Hu  and  Schmidhalter,  2005).  Both  Na



+

 

and  K



+

  ions  have  similar  chemical  properties  and  such 

similarity  causes  competition  in  uptake  of  these  ions  by 

plants  (Amtmann  et  al.,  2004).  This  was  also  stated  by 

Schachtman and Liu (1999) that in saline soils the excess 

Na

+



  will  reduce  K

+

  uptake  due  to  competitive  effects. 



Therefore,  high  ratios  of    K

+

  :  Na



  will  also  improve the 

resistance of the plant to salinity (Asch et al.,  2000),  and 

 

 



 

*Corresponding author. E-mail: nra-fp@ub.ac.id. 

has  been  used  to  evaluate  the  selectivity  of  ion  uptake 

under  saline  conditions  and  thus  the  ability  of  plants  to 

tolerate salt stress. 

Large proportion of saline land is also subject to water 

logging (saturation of the soil) because of the presence of 

the  shallow  water-table  or  decreased  infiltration  of 

surface water (Barret-Lennard, 2003, Teakle et al., 2006). 

Detrimental  effects  of  water  logging  on  plant  growth  are 

predominantly  due  to  the  low  oxygen  concentration 

around  roots  in  water-saturated  soils.  This  is  caused  by 

either  the  continuous  oxygen  consumption  by  roots  and 

micro-organisms  present  in  the  soil  or  a  severely 

hampered  rate  of  oxygen  diffusion  from  the  atmosphere 

to  the  roots  (Vartapetian  and  Jackson,  1997;  Barret-

Lennard, 2003; Teakle et al., 2006). 

Different 

plant 

families, 



genera, 

species 


and 

provenances show vary in their salinity and water logging 

tolerance.  However,  their  tolerance  is  inhibited  by  ex-

posure either to salinity or water logging especially when 

both stresses happen simultaneously (Van der Moezel et 

al., 1988). Unfortunately,  in

  

many 


 

field


  

situations,  water 



 

 

 



 

logging is usually associated with salinity. Therefore, it is 

necessary  to  study  the  adaptation  of  plants  to  combined 

stresses  of  salinity  and  water  logging.  Barrett-Lennard 

(2003)  stated  that  three  possible  strategies  of  plant 

adaptations to the water logging/salinity interaction are by 

avoiding  hypoxia  through  the  formation  of  aerenchym, 

reducing  stomatal  conductance,  or  by  protecting 

metabolism  through  the  implementaton  of  salt  removal 

strategies. 



Melaleuca species are generally more salt-tolerant than 

the most  salt-tolerant  Eucalyptus  and  Casuarina  species 

(Van  der  Moezel  et  al.,  1988).  Many  Melaleuca  species 

grow  in  saturated  soils  near  water  bodies,  often  in 

swamps  and  estuaries  or  in  seasonal  streams  in  arid 

areas  that  are  occasionally  subjected  to  inundation 

(Holliday, 1989; Naidu et al., 2000).  

The  objectives  of  this  study  were:  1)  to  evaluate 

ecophysiological responses of three Melaleuca species to 

salinity, water logging and the combined stresses; and 2) 

to examine relationships among salt levels in the soil, ion 

accumulation  in  shoots  and  roots,  and  biomass 

production. 

 

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

 

Soil and plant materials 

 

Virgin  brown  sandy  soil  (Uc4.22,  Northcote,  1979)  was  collected 



from a bushland site in Western Australia (31°56

 S, 115°



20’ E). The 

soil  was  air-dried,  sieved  through  a  2-mm  sieve  and  thoroughly 

mixed.  The soil  analyses showed that  it contents  1  mg NO

3

-



-N, 57 

mg  K (NaHCO

3

-extractable)  and  10.3 g  organic carbon per kg  soil 



and  had  a  pH  buffering  capacity  of  0.56  cmol  H

+

  kg



-1

  pH


-1

  (Tang, 

1998).  The soil was then placed in polyvinyl chloride pots. 

The  pots (410 mm deep, 90 mm diameter) had a 20 mm layer of 

gravel  at  the  bottom.  An  8  mm  diameter  hole  was  drilled  through 

the  bottom  of  the  pot  and  a  piece  of  transparent  hose  was  glued 

into the hole. Each pot contained 3 kg of soil. 

Basal  nutrients  were  added  in  solution  to  each  pot  at  the 

following rates (mg per kg soil):  KH

2

PO



4

 (91), K


2

SO

4



 (174), CaCO

3

 



(300),  MgSO

4

.7H



2

O  (49),  CuSO

4

.5H


2

O  (2.5),  MnSO

4

.H

2



O  (3.4), 

H

3



BO

3

 (0.6), Na



2

MoO


4

.2H


2

O (0.2), ZnSO

4

.7H


2

O (2.9), and NH

4

NO

3



 

(40).  After  air-drying,  nutrients  were  thoroughly  mixed  with  the  soil 

by shaking in a plastic jar. NH

4

NO



3

 was added as basal fertilisation 

initially  as  well  as  every  2  weeks  starting  in  week  5  after 

transplanting.  Soil  was  watered  to  field  capacity  [11%  (w/w)]  with 

deionised water and incubated for 2 days before planting. 

Plant  materials  used  in  this  experiment  were  three  Melaleuca 

species that is, (1) Melaleuca halmaturorum, a deep-rooted species 

commonly  found  around  salt  lakes  and  brackish  swamps  on  soils 

with high clay content and with NaCl as dominant salt; it is expected 

to  have  high tolerance to  water  logging  and salinity;  (2)  Melaleuca 



thyoides,  a  shallow-rooted  species  occurring  at  the  interface 

between  sand  dunes  and  salt  flats;  it  is  expected  to  have  high 

tolerance  to  salinity  and  moderate  tolerance  to  water  logging;  and 

(3) Melaleuca  nesophila, commonly found on sandy soils in coastal 

areas;  it  is  expected  to  tolerate  high  NaCl  concentration,  but  not 

water logging (Holliday, 1989; Wrigley and Fagg, 1993). 



 

 

Experimental design and treatments 

 

For each plant species under study, treatments were arranged  in  a 



Aini et al.         53 

 

 



 

randomised block design,  involving four salt  and two  water logging 

levels as treatments. Uniform seedlings were transplanted into pots. 

In  order  to  reduce  the  variation  between  replicate  pots,  two 

seedlings  were  grown  in  each  pot.  Soil  surface  was  covered  with 

alkathene  beads to  minimise water  loss by  evaporation.  Pots  were 

weighed and soil was watered to field capacity with deionised water 

every  second  day.  Plants  were  grown  in  a  glasshouse  with 

temperature maintained at around 23°C. 

Four salt levels were used for the study, viz. 0.3, 0.8, 2.0 and 5.0 

g  NaCl  kg

-1

  soil.  Salt  treatments  were  introduced  gradually  by 



adding the NaCl solution every second day starting on day 28 after 

transplanting. After the salt treatments were fully established at the 

levels  planned  (6

th

  week),  pots  were  watered  to  field  capacity  with 



deionised  water  every  second  day.  Water  logging  treatment  was 

imposed on day 91 by connecting a hose at the bottom of pot to a 

container filled with deionised water; the water level was maintained 

at 2 cm above the soil surface. 



 

 

Plant growth and ion content measurements 

 

Shoot height was measured weekly starting from the first week after 



transplanting.  Plants  were  harvested  105  days  (M.  thyoides)  and 

119  days  (M.  halmaturorum  and  M.  nesophila)  after  transplanting. 

Roots  were  separated  from  the  soil  by  sieving  through  a  4-mm 

sieve.  Roots  were  then  rinsed  with  deionised  water  and  dried  at 

70°C  for  48  h.  Shoot  fresh  weight  was  determined  after  drying  at 

70°C for 48 h. 

Concentration  of  Na

+

  and  K



+

  in  dried  shoots  and  roots  were 

determined  using  atomic  absorption  spectrometry  (AAS)  after 

digestion in hot concentrated nitric acid  as outlined by Reuter  et al. 

(1986). Sub-samples of 0.5 g each were placed in 50 mL flasks and 

10  mL  of  concentrated  nitric  acid  added.  The  mixture  was  first 

heated  on  fry  pans  to  90°C  for  30  min,  and  then  temperature 

increased to 140°C to remove  excess nitric  acid. De-ionised  water 

was added to make up to the 23 mL volume of the primary extract. 

An  aliquot  of  this  primary  extract  was  diluted  for  determination  of 

sodium  (Na

+

),  potassium  (K



+

)  and  calcium  (Ca

2+

)  concentration 



using the AAS (Perkin Elmer AAnalyst 300, USA). To minimize  ion 

interferences,  a  solution  of  lanthanum  oxide  (La

2

O

3



)  was  added  to 

each diluted extract to give a lanthanum content of 0.1% (w/w). The 

Na

+

/K



+

  and  Na

+

/Ca


2+

  ratios  were  calculated  for  shoots  and  roots 

under  different  salinity  levels.  Chloride  was  extracted  in  hot  water 

by  shaking  for  48  h  followed  by  measurement  using  a  chloride-

sensitive electrode. 

 

 

Statistical analysis 

 

A  two-way  analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA)  was  conducted  using 



GENSTAT  VI  (Genstat  VI  Committee,  2002)  statistical  package  to 

compare  the  main  effects  and  interactive  effects  combined  salinity 

and  water  logging  stress  on  shoot  biomass,  root  biomass,  plant 

height  and  Na

+

/K

+



  ratios  of  plant  tissues.  Differences  among  the 

treatments  were  separated  by  the  Fisher’s  protected  least 

significant difference (LSD) test at a significance level of 5%.  

 

 

RESULTS  

 

Growth response 

 

By the time of harvest, dry weights of shoots and roots of 



the  three  Melaleuca  species  decreased  with  increasing 

salinity levels (Table 1). For example, shoot dry weight of 

plants grown at 5 g NaCl kg

-1

  soil  decreased  to  30,  50,  



54         Int. J. Plant Physiol. Biochem. 

 

 



 

Table  1.  Dry  weight  of shoots  and roots  of three  Melaleuca  species grown for 105 (M. thyoides)  or 119 days (M. halmaturorum  and  M. nesophila)  at various levels  of salinity which were 

commenced on day 28. 

 

Treatment salinity 

(g NaCl kg

-1

 soil) 

Shoot dry weight (g/pot) 

Shoot dry weight (g/pot) 

M. halmaturorum 

M. thyoides 

M. nesophila 

M. halmaturorum 

M. thyoides 

M. nesophila 

0.3 


12.34 a 

5.95 a 


24.0 a 

2.08 a 


1.02 a 

5.04 a 


0.8 

12.42 a 


6.17 a 

21.5 a 


1.99 a 

0.96 a 


3.21 b 

8.53 b 



5.12 a 

12.3 b 


1.56 b 

0.91 a 


1.27 c 

3.68 c 



3.00 b 

2.6 c 


1.02 c 

0.61 b 


0.64 c 

 

Values in a column followed by different letter showed significantly different at = 0.05.



 

 

 



 

and  11%  of  the  0.3  g  NaCl  kg

-1

  treatment  for  M. 



halmaturorum,  M.  thyoides,  and  M.  nesophila

respectively.  Comparable  values  were  obtained 

for the root growth decrease as a consequence of 

increasing  salinity  (Tabel  1).  Melaleuca  species 

were  not  affected  by  water  logging  treatment, 

except that M. thyoides died after 1 week of being 

subjected  to  water  logging  at  high  salt  level  (5  g 

NaCl kg


-1

 soil). 


 

 

Tissue mineral concentration 

 

The  three  Melaleuca  species  differed  in  their 



response to water logging and salinity. Significant 

interaction between water logging and salinity was 

observed  for  sodium  (Na

+

)  and  chloride  (Cl



-

tissue  concentration  in  M.  halmaturorum,  M. 



thyoides,  and  M.  nesophila.  Generally,  shoots  of 

Melaleuca species accumulated more Na

+

 and Cl



-

 

when  grown  in  water  logging  soil  compared  with 



non-waterlogged one (Table 2) 

Na

+



  concentration  in  shoots  and  roots  of  M. 

halmaturorum  and  M.  thyoides  increased  signi-

ficantly with increasing salinity level (Table 2). Na

+

 

concentration in shoots grown at 5 g NaCl kg



-1

 soil 


increased  approximately  5,  7  and  4  times fold  as 

compared  with  values  obtained  at  3  g  NaCl  kg

-1

 

soil  for  M.  halmaturorum,  M.  thyoides,  and  M. 



nesophila, respectively. However, for M. nesophila 

there  was  no  difference  in  root  concentration  of 

Na

+

 regardless the NaCl treatment, with shoot Na



+

 

concentration increasing only at 5 g NaCl kg



-1

 soil 


compared  with  those  for  the  0.3  g  NaCl  kg

-1

  salt 



treatment (Table 2). In general, Na

+

 accumulation 



was greater in the root than the shoot tissue of M. 

halmaturorum  and  M.  thyoides..  In  contrast,  M. 

nesophila  shoots  had  higher  Na

+

  concentration 



compared  with  the  root  tissue.  The  shoots  of  M. 

halmaturorum,  M. thyoides  and  M.  nesophila  had 

greater  Na

+

  concentration  in  the  water  logging 



compared  to  the  non-waterlogged  treatment, 

especially at 2 and 5 g NaCl kg

-1

 soil tratments. 



Interactive  effects  of  salinity  and  water  logging 

were  evident for  the  Cl

-1

 concentrations  in  shoots 



and  roots  of  M.  halmaturorum,  M.  thyoides,  and 

M. nesophila. The Cl

-1

 concentrations in roots and 



shoots 

of 


Melaleuca 

species 


significantly 

increased  with  increasing  salinity  levels,  both  for 

water  logging  or  non-waterlogged  treatment 

(Table 2). Higher Cl

-1

 concentration was observed 



in  shoot  of  three  Melaleuca  species  compared 

with roots. 

The shoot K

+

 concentration was affected by the 



interaction  between  salinity  and  water  logging 

(Table  2).  For  example,  shoot  K

+

  in  M. 



halmaturorum  under  water  logging  did  not  differ 

among  NaCl  treatments,  whereas  under  the  non-

waterlogged  treatments  shoot  K

+

  concentration  in 



the  2  and  5  g  NaCl  treatments  were  significantly 

lower  than  those  in  the  0.3  and  0.8  g  NaCl 

treatments. For M. thyoides, the shoot K

+

 concen-



tration under water logging treatment were similar 

for the 0.3, 0.8, 2 and 5 g NaCl treatments Under 

the  non-waterlogged  condition  the  shoot  K

+

 



concentration  showed  a  gradual  decrease  with 

increased  NaCl  level.  The  trend  in  shoot  K

+

 

concentration  in  M.  nesophila  was  reversed 



compared  with  the  other  two  Melaleuca  species. 

Under  both  waterlogged  and  non-waterlogged 

conditions  the  shoot  K

+

  concentration  in  the  5  g 



NaCl  treatment  was  much  greater  than  those  in 

other NaCl treatments. The concentration of K

+

 in 


roots differed among salinity treatments only in M. 

thyoides,  with  the  5  g  NaCl  treatment  having  the 

lowest  K

+

  concentration  compared  with  other 



treatment. 

The  significant  interaction  between  water 

logging  and  salinity  with  respect  to  the  Na

+

/K



+

 

ratio  in  shoots  were  observed  in  shoot  of  M. 



halmaturorum,  M.  thyoides  and  M.  nesophila  The 

shoot  Na

+

/K

+



  ratio  in  M.  halmaturorum,  M. 

thyoides and M. nesophila at all NaCl levels ware 

higher when plants were grown in the waterlogged 



Aini et al.         55 

 

 



 

Table  2.  Sodium (Na

+

) Chloride (Cl



-

),  and potassium (K

+

) concentration  in shoots  and roots  of three  Melaleuca  species grown  under different salinity (NaCI)  levels  at field capacity  or with 



water logging (WL). 

 

 



Treatment 

 

Water logging 

Salinity 

(g NaCl/kg soil) 

Na

+

 

(mg.g

-1

 dw) 

Cl



(mg.g

-1

 dw) 

K

+

 

(mg.g

-1

 dw) 

Na

+

 

(mg.g

-1

 dw) 

Cl



(mg.g

-1

 dw) 

K

+

 

(mg.g

-1

 dw) 

 

 

Shoot 

Root 

 

 



 

 

 

 



 

 

M. halmaturorum 

 

Field capacity 

0.3 

2.99   c 



12.18 bc 

8.46   a 

4.94   c 

11.10   b 

7.93   a 

 

0.8 



4.40   c 

14.81   b 

8.11   a 

9.92   b 

19.00 ab 

7.12   a 

 



7.82 bc 



18.75 ab 

6.03   b 

14.73   a 

21.90 ab 

6.36   a 

 



10.59   b 

22.84   a 

5.81   b 

17.99   a 

25.60   a 

6.45   a 

Water logging 

0.3 


2.80   c 

7.12   c 

6.54   b 

8.11 bc 


9.10   b 

8.04   a 

 

0.8 


4.61   c 

9.53   c 

6.21   b 

8.83 bc 


11.50   b 

8.02   a 

 



9.53 bc 



13.38 bc 

6.32   b 

13.30 ab 

15.90   b 

6.61   a 

 



18.85   a 

20.07   a 

6.40   b 

17.71   a 

17.90 ab 

6.12   a 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

 

M. thyoides 

Field capacity 

0.3 

1.49   d 



6.65   c 

9.66   a 

5.94 a 

5.04   b 



8.19   a 

 

0.8 



2.66   d 

8.39   c 

8.46   b 

9.75   a 

7.77   b 

7.65   a 

 



6.63   c 



11.11 bc 

7.21   c 

11.49   a 

9.78 ab 


7.12   a 

 



10.05 bc 

14.31   b 

6.41   c 

15.13   a 

11.34 ab 

4.23   b 

Water logging 

0.3 


3.63 cd 

6.13   c 

7.98 bc 

8.22   a 

5.65   b 

9.09   a 

 

0.8 


5.54 cd 

8.28   c 

8.38 bc 

11.34   a 

8.00 ab 

7.68   a 

 



11.77   b 



13.61   b 

6.19   c 

14.25   a 

11.83   a 

3.53 bc 

 



25.55   a 

26.39   a 

7.25   c 

14.16   a 

11.40 ab 

1.80   c 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

M. nesophila 

Field capacity 

0.3 

6.8   c 


12.82   d 

7.23   c 

6.46   a 

4.01   b 

4.18 ab 

 

0.8 



13.5 bc 

17.62 cd 

7.63   c 

6.36   a 

6.08   b 

4.18 ab 


 

16.4 bc 



22.28 bc 

6.50   c 

11.29   a 

7.42   b 

3.74 ab 

 



17.3 bc 

27.01   b 

11.96   a 

12.47   a 

14.66   a 

3.02 ab 


Water logging 

0.3 


12.4 bc 

16.37 cd 

6.57   c 

8.19   a 

7.03   b 

4.62 ab 


 

0.8 


15.4 bc 

20.58   c 

6.05   c 

6.15   a 

6.93   b 

4.35 ab 


 

21.2   b 



24.50 bc 

6.13   c 

9.67   a 

9.39 ab 


4.69   a 

 



54.1   a 

45.19   a 

9.88   b 

7.25   a 

11.95 ab 

2.34   b 

 

Within the eight combinations of salt x water logging treatments for each species, means followed by different letter indicated significant difference at 0.05 significance level. 



 

56         Int. J. Plant Physiol. Biochem. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

0.3


0.8

2

5



Field capacity

Waterlogging



a

bc

c

c

b

bc

c

c

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

0.3

0.8

2

5

Field capacity

Waterlogging

Na

+

/K



ra

ti

o

 in

 r

o

o

ts

a

b

c

c

a

ab

bc

c

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

0.3

0.8

2

5

Field capacity

Waterlogging

M. thyoides

a

b

cd

d

b

c

d

d

0



2

4

6

8

10

12

0.3

0.8

2

5

Field capacity

Waterlogging

a

b

b

b

b

b

b

b

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

0.3

0.8

2

5

Field capacity

Waterlogging

M. nesophila

Salt level (g NaCl/kg soil)

M. nesophila

a

b

bc

c

c

bc

c

c



Na

+

/K

+

ra

ti



in 

sho

ot

s

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

0.3

0.8

2

5

Field capacity

Waterlogging

M. nesophila

ab

b

b

b

a

ab

b

b

 

 



Figure 1. Interactive effects of salinity and water logging on Na

+

/K



+

 ratio in shoots and 

roots  of  Melaleuca  thyoides  (grown  for  105  days),  Melaleuca  halmaturorum  and 

Melaleuca  nesophila  grown  for  119  days,  respectively,  in  soil  columns.  Salinity 

treatments commenced on day 28 and water logging commenced on day 91. Values 

followed by the same letter are not different at P=0.05 

 

 



 

compared with the control (field capacity) soil (Figure 1). 

This interactive effect also observed in M. thyoides root. 

 

 



DISCUSSION  

 

This  study  demonstrated  that  Melaleuca  species  were 



differentially  affected  by  the  interaction  of  water  logging 

and salinity. This interaction affected the accumulation of 

Na

+

, Cl



-

 and Na


+

/K

+



 ratio in M. HalmaturorumM. thyoides 

and  M.  nesophila  shoots.  Similar  studies  on  other  plant 

species  have  shown  that  the  combination  of  water 

logging and salinity is considerably more detrimental than 

the  single  stress  alone,  especially  at  increasing  salinity 

(Meddings et al., 2001, Barrett 

 Lenard, 2003, Teakle et 



al., 2006).  

 

 

 



 

The  Na


+

/K

+



  ratio in  M.  Halmaturorum,  M.  thyoides  and 

M.  nesophila  shoots  increased  with  increasing  salinity 

and  was  higher  in  water  logging  compared  with  non-

water  logging  treatment.  This  could  be  due  to  reduced 

control of Na

+

 intake as a result of the damage to the cell 



membrane  structures  and  the  energy  generation 

mechanisms,  especially  under  high  NaCl  concentration. 

Such  disruptions  might  also  have  decreased  selectivity 

for  K


+

  compared  with  Na

+

,  thus  facilitating  accumulation 



of  Na

+

  without  equivalent  uptake  of K



+

  required  to main-

tain  an  optimum  ion  balance  for  metabolic  processes. 

The  increase  in  salt  accumulation  due  to  salinity  and 

water  logging  was  likely  to  be  caused  by  increased 

passive  uptake  of  Na

+

  through  damaged  membranes 



(Drew and Dikumwin, 1985) and as a result of breakdown 

in  active  exclusion  mechanisms  (Thomson  et  al.,  1989). 

However, this was not the case for M. halmaturorum and 

M.  nesophila  roots,  indicating  that  different  species  of 

Melaleuca  have different responses to  salinity and  water 

logging. 

In  this  study,  all the  Melaleuca  species  survived,  even 

though the stem elongation and dry matter accumulation 

were  reduced  with  increasing  saline  levels.  This  result 

supports the previous studies reporting an adverse effect 

on stem elongation due to increasing NaCl concentration 

(Tozlu et al., 2000). M. thyoides appeared relatively more 

tolerant  to  salinity  than  M.  halmaturorum  and  M. 

nesophila.    The  more  tolerance  of  M  thyoides  might  be 

due  to  genetically  characteristric  of  the  plant  (Marcar  et 

al.,  1995).  The  plant  height  of  M.  thyoides  was  not 

influenced 

by 

salinity 



treatment, 

whereas 


M. 

halmaturorum and M. nesophila were significantly stunted 

at 5 g NaCl kg

-1

 soil. The decline in shoot biomass of M. 



thyoides  occurred  only  at  the  highest  salinity  level, 

whereas root growth was not affected. However, biomass 

production  of  M.  halmaturorum  and  M.  nesophila  was 

decreased even under low salinity (2 g NaCl kg

-1

 soil). 


Na

+

  and  Cl



-

  concentration  in  roots  and  shoots  of  three 



Melaleuca  species  increased  with  increasing  salinity, 

except in  M.  nesophila  roots.  These  results  suggest  that 

there is no blocking or exclusion mechanism for accumu-

lation of Na

+

 and Cl


-

. In general, the accumulation of Na

+

 

was greater in roots of M. halmaturorum and M. thyoides 



than  in  the  shoots.  Hence,  these  two  species  had  the 

capacity  to  sequester  salt  in  roots,  thus  minimizing  the 

exposure  of  leaf  cells  (containing  photosynthetic 

apparatus) to high concentration of salt (Garg and Gupta, 

1997).  On  the  contrary,  this  was  not  the  case  for  M. 

nesophila, supporting differential salinity resistance within 

Melaleuca species. 

Beside the increase in Na

+

 and Cl


-

 tissue concentration 

with  increasing  salinity,  the  strongest  effect  of  salinity  in 

this experiment was manifested in the Na

+

/K

+



 ratio, which 

increased both in shoots and roots of Melaleuca species, 

except  in  M.  nesophila  roots.  The  high  Na

+

/K



+

  ratio 


reflected ion imbalances caused by salinity. These results 

are consistent with those reported in Taxodium distichum 

(Allen et al., 1996), Poncirus trifoliata (Tozlu et al., 2000) and

 

Aini et al.         57 



 

 

 



Vitis vinifera (Fisarakis et al., 2001). 

Water 


logging 

causes 


hypoxia 

(low 


oxygen 

concentration)  and  successively  lower  redox  potentials 

(Barrett-Lennard,  2003). The  earliest  responses  to  water 

logging  are  reduced  water  absorption  and  transpiration. 

Further responses may include decreased root and shoot 

growth,  reduced  mineral  uptake,  causing  premature  leaf 

senescence,abscission,  and  shoot  dieback  (Kozlowski 

and  Pallardy,  1997).  Our  results  demonstrated  that 

biomass  of  three Melaleuca  species  was  not  affected by 

water  logging  for  up  to  4  weeks,  except  decreased  root 

growth  of M. halmaturorum and M. thyoides in the  water 

logging  treatment.  Nevertheless,  the  Na

+

/K

+



  ratio  for 

Melaleuca  shoots,  except  for  M.  halmaturorum,  was 

significantly  higher  in  waterlogged  compared  with  non-

waterlogged treatments. These results indicate that water 

logging  reduces  the  selectivity  for  K

+

  relative  to  Na



+

Hypoxia  condition  also  most  likely  caused  a  significant 



efflux  of  K

+

  from  the  root,  as  evidenced  by  lower  K



+

 

concentration  in  the  roots,  especially  for  M.  thyoides



Similar findings have been reported for Atriplex amnicola 

where 80% loss of K

+

 from roots occurred under hypoxia 



(Galloway and Davidson, 1993). 

 

 

Conclusion 

 

Melaleuca  species  exhibit  differential  salinity  resistance. 

Water  logging  increased  the  uptake  of  Na

+

  and  Cl



-

  as 


reflected  in  higher  shoot  concentration.  Thus  Melaleuca 

species  levels  of  tolerance  are  drastically  reduced  when 

plants  are  subjected  to  water  logging.  This  has 

implications  in  rehabilitation  of  saline-waterlogged  lands, 

using Melaleuca species. 

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

 

Funding  for  this  research  was  provided  by  the  Co-

operative Research Centre for Plant-Based Management 

of  Dryland  Salinity.  Thanks  to  Michael  Smirk,  Paul 

Damon and Lorraine Osborne for assistance with sample 

preparation and analyses. 

 

 

REFERENCES  



 

Al-Karaki  GN  (2000).  Growth,  water  use  efficiency,  and  mineral 

acquisition  by  tomato  cultivars  grown  under  salt  stress.  J.  of  Plant 

Nutri., 23: 1-8. 

Allen  JA,  SR  Pezeshki,    JL  Chambers  (1996).    Interaction  of  flooding 

and  salinity  stress  on  baldcypress  (Taxodium  distichum),  Tree 

Physiol., 16: 307-313. 

Amtmann  A,  Armengaud  P,  Volkov  V  (2004).  Potassium  nutrition  and 

salt  stress.  In:  Blatt  MR  (Ed),  Membrance  transport  in  plants, 

Blackwell, Oxford, 293-339. 

Asch  F,  Dingkuhn  M,  Miezan  K,  Dörffling  K  (2000).  Leaf  K/Na  ratio 

predicts  salinity  induced  yield  loss  in  irrigated  rice.  Euphytica,  113: 

109-118. 

Ashraf  M,  Harris  PJC  (2004).  Potential  biochemical  indicators  of  salt 

tolerance in plants. Plant Sci., 166: 3-16. 


58         Int. J. Plant Physiol. Biochem. 

 

 



 

Barrett-Lennard  EG (2003). The interaction  between  water logging  and 

salinity  in  higher  plants:  causes,  consequences  and  implications. 

Plant Soil, 253: 35-54. 

Drew  MC,  E  Dikumwin  (1985).    Sodium  exclusion  from  the  shoots  by 

roots  of  Zea  mays  (cv.  LG11)  and  its  breakdown  with  oxygen 

deficiency, J. Exp. Bot., 36: 55-62. 

Fisarakis I,  Chartzoulakis K, Stavrakas D (2001). Response  of Sultana 

vines (V. vinifera L.)  on six rootstocks to NaCl salinity  exposure  and 

recovery. Agric. Water Manage., 51: 13-27. 

Galloway R, Davidson NJ (1993). The response of Atriplex amnicola to 

the  interactive  effects  of  salinity  and  hypoxia.  J.  Experimental  Bot., 

44: 653-663. 

Garg  BK,  Gupta  IC  (1997).  Saline  waste  lands  environment  and  Plant 

Growth. Scientific Publishers, Jodhpur. India. 287 pp. 

Genstat  VI  Committee  (2002).  Genstat  VI,  Release  6.1,  Reference 

Manual. Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford, United Kingdom. p. 258. 

Holliday  I  (1989).    A  Field  Guide  to  Melaleucas.  (Hamlyn  Australia, 

Victoria). p. 254. 

Hu  Y,  Schmidhalter  U  (2005).  Drought  and  salinity:  A  compariton  of 

their effects on mineral nutriton of plants. J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci., 168: 

541-549. 

Kozlowski TT, Pallardy SG (1997). Growth control in woody plants. 2nd 

Edn. Academic Press, San Diego. p. 641. 

Marcar  N,  Crawford  D,  Leppert  P,  Jovanovic  T,  Floyd  R,  Farrow  R 

(2002).  Trees  for  saltland;  a  guide  to  selecting  native  species  for 

Australia. CSIRO Press, Melbourne Victoria, Australia. p. 72. 

Meddings  RLA,  McComb  JA,  Bell  DT  (2001).  The  salt-waterlogging 

tolerance  of  Eucalyptus  camaldulensis  x  E.  globulus  hybrids. 

Australian J.  Experimental Agri., 41: 787-792. 

Munns  R  (2002).  Comparative  physiology  of  salt  and  water  stress. 

Plant, Cell Environ., 25(2): 239-250. 

Munns R, James GJ, Läuchli (2006). Approaches to increasing the salt 

tolerance of wheat and other cereals. J. Exp. Bot., 57: 1025-1043. 

Naidu  BP,  Paleg  LG,  Jones  GP  (2000).  Accumulation  of  proline 

analogues  and  adaptation  of  Melaleuca  species  to  diverse 

environments in Australian J. Bot., 48: 611-620. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Northcote  KH  (1979).  A  Factual  Key  for  the  Recognition  of  Australian 

Soils,  4th  ed.  Rellim  Technical  Publications,  Glenside,  South 

Australia. p. 124. 

Reuter  DJ,  Robinson  JB,  Peverilland  KI,  Price  GH  (1986).  Guidelines 

for collecting, handling  and  analyzing plant materials.  In: D.J. Reuter 

and  J.B.  Robinson  (ed.)  Plant  analysis  an  interpretation  manual. 

Inkata Press, Melbourne, Australia. p. 11-35. 

Schachtman  D,  Liu  W  (1999).  Molecular  pieces  to  the  puzzle  of  the 

interaction  between  potassium  and  sodium  uptake  in  plants.  Trends 

Plant Sci. Rev., 4: 281-287. 

Tang  C  (1998).  Factors  affecting  soil  acidification  under  legumes  I. 

Effect of potassium supply. Plant Soil, 199: 275-285. 

Teakle  NI,  Real  D,  Colmer  TD  (2006).  Growth  and  ion  relations  in 

response  to  combined  salinity  and  waterlogging  in  the  perennial 

forage legumes  Lotus corniculatus  and Lotus  lenuis. Plant Soil,  289: 

369-383. 

Thomson  CJ,  Atwell  BJ,  Greenway  H  (1989).  Response  of  wheat 

seedlings  to  low  O

2

  concentration  in  nutrient  solution.  II.  K



+

/Na


+

 

selectivity of root tissues of different age. Annal Bot., 40: 993-999. 



Tozlu  I,  Moore  GA,  Guy  CL  (2000).  Effects  of  increasing  NaCl 

concentration  on  stem  elongation,  dry  mass  production,  and  macro- 

and  micro-nutrient  accumulation  in  Poncirus  trifoliata.  Australian  J. 

Plant Physiol., 27: 35-42. 

Van  der  Moezel  PG,  Watson  LE,  Pearce-Pinto  GWN,  Bell  DT  (1988). 

The response of six, Eucalyptus species and Casuarina obesa to the 

combined  effect  of  salinity  and  water  logging.  Australian  J.  Plant 

Physio., 15: 465-474. 

Vartapetian  BB,  Jackson  MB  (1997).  Plant  adaptation  to  anaerobic 

stress. Annals Bot., 79: 3-20. 

Wrigley JW, Fagg M (1993). Bottlebrushes, paperbarks & tea trees, and 

all  other  plants  in  the  Leptospermum  alliance.  HarperCollins 



Publishers, Sydney, Australia. Angus and Robertson, Sydney. p. 352. 

 

 




Yüklə 328,15 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə