I n t h I s I s s u e



Yüklə 1,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix14.01.2017
ölçüsü1,38 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

N E W S   I N   B R I E F

>> Read more on page 2

>> Read more on page 6

>> Read more on page 6

I N  T H I S   I S S U E

S P R I N G   2 011



Environmental Factors and Parkinson’s:

What Have We Learned?

News  


            Review

Get Involved in Parkinson’s 

Awareness Month                

2

Spotlight on Research          



3

Legal Issues & PD: Medicaid                   

4

The Advocate Report: Sue Dubman 



of Massachusetts       

9

Advisory Council Member 



Raises $37,000     

11

Proteins May Travel from Cell to Cell,



Spreading Parkinson’s in the Brain

A new study suggests that a dam-

aged protein can spread from sick cells

to healthy ones in the brain, providing a

possible explanation for how Parkinson’s

disease (PD) progresses.  The study ap-

pears in the January 19 online edition of

the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

In people with Parkinson’s, neurons

— the nerve cells in the brain that help

control the body’s movements — de-

velop clusters of a protein called alpha-

synuclein.  When these proteins clump

together, they are known as Lewy bod-

ies, and these have been linked to the

cell death that triggers PD.  

In earlier research, two separate

teams — one led by Patrik Brundin,

Ph.D., M.D., at Lund University in Swe-

den and the other led by Jeffrey Kor-

dower, Ph.D., at the Parkinson’s Disease

Foundation (PDF) Center for Parkinson’s

Research at Rush University in Chicago

— studied the brains of people with PD

who had received transplants of healthy

young neurons as a therapy.  Both teams

found that the newly transplanted neu-

rons also developed Lewy bodies, sug-

gesting that they “contracted” PD from

Chock full o’ Nuts 

Helps Fight Parkinson’s 

See page 10 for full story

By Caroline M. Tanner, M.D., Ph.D.

Scientists generally agree that most

cases of Parkinson’s disease (PD) result

from some combination of nature and

nurture — the interaction between a

person’s underlying genetic make-up

and his or her life activities and envi-

ronmental exposures.  A simple way to

describe this is that “genetics

loads the gun and environ-

ment pulls the trigger.”

In this formulation,

“environment” has a

very broad meaning

— that is, it refers to

any and all possible

causes other than those

that are genetic in origin.

The interactions between genes

and environment can be quite com-

plex.  Some environmental expo-

sures may lower the risk of PD,

while others may increase it.  Simi-

larly, some people have inherited a ge-

netic makeup that makes them more or

less susceptible to the effects of toxi-

cants, or poisonous agents, than oth-

ers.  The effect of a combined exposure

can be greater — or lower — than a

single exposure.  All of this means that

the particular combination of factors

leading to PD is likely to be unique for

each person.  These combinations, in

different ways, may trigger a common

series of biological changes that will ul-

timately lead to the disease.

Scientists are beginning to tease

apart the non-genetic factors that influ-

ence PD risk.  In particular, epidemiolo-

gists are working to identify

differences in the experiences

of people who develop PD,

compared to those who do

not.  But identifying these

risk factors can be difficult.

And when we do identify

them, they serve only as

clues.  They do not provide a

direct explanation for the cause

of Parkinson’s, so scientists must

supplement these population studies

with laboratory experiments.

The following is a list of some of

the risk factors for which we have

found some evidence of an association

with PD.  For the most part, it is too

soon to make recommendations for

how to prevent Parkinson’s based on

this research.  However, these results

may help us to understand the causes

of PD, and provide direction for future

research and therapy development.



April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month.

Over the years, you have told us that

the public needs to better understand

Parkinson's and we agree.  This April,

join the Parkinson’s community in

shattering the myths of Parkinson’s by:



Shatter the Myths of Parkinson’s 

this April!

PDF is offering a free 30-page 2011 toolkit with tips on ways to make

a difference this coming April.  Order your free copy today. 

2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

PA R K I N S O N ’ S   D I S E AS E   F OU N DAT I O N

News In Brief 

Continued from page 1

the brain in which they were transplanted.

In the new study, Dr. Brundin and his

colleagues tested the idea that alpha-

synuclein can travel from one cell to an-

other.  First, the team studied the process

in cell culture.  They moved on to experi-

ments with mice with PD symptoms, that

showed excess alpha-synuclein in their

brains.  The researchers transplanted

healthy neurons into the brains of these

mice and observed their effects.

Results



Alpha-synuclein did indeed move from



one neuron to another in both cell cul-

ture and in living animals

There is a specific mechanism by which



this travel takes place

When alpha-synuclein enters a healthy



neuron, it can initiate or “seed” the for-

mation of Lewy body clumps.   

What Does it Mean?

This study aimed to assess the “con-

tagious protein” hypothesis of Parkin-

son’s, which theorizes that neurons may

“infect” other neurons with damaged

alpha-synuclein, a protein that seems to

be important in determining how PD de-

velops.  In 1997, Stanley Pruziner, M.D.,

received the Nobel Prize for his surprising

discovery that some damaged proteins,

rather than live organisms such as

viruses, can be infectious.  Damaged or

mis-folded proteins have since been im-

plicated in such conditions as mad cow

disease.  The new study demonstrates

that alpha-synuclein is able to enter and

affect healthy neurons.  It also suggests

that the protein may initiate the formation

of new Lewy body clumps which are the

hallmark of Parkinson’s.  Much about the

nature of the alpha-synuclein “seeding”

process remains unclear.  Additional re-

search is required to assess whether

alpha-synuclein “infectivity” is a cause of

PD disease progression, or is simply a

minor aspect of the disease itself.  Lastly,

these results — if they are confirmed by

future studies — suggest that the toxic

form of alpha-synuclein should be seen as

a target of new therapies. 



>> Read more on page 8

April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month

N E W S   &   R E V I E W

S P R I N G   2 011



S

p

re

a

d

 th

e

 W

o

rd

E

d



u

c

a



te

 Y

o



u

rs

e



lf 

   


|

S

u



p

p

o



rt

 th


e

 C

u



re

2011 CITY/STATE PROCLAMATION TEMPLATE

WHEREAS, Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurological movement disorder of the

central nervous system, which has a unique impact on each patient; and

WHEREAS, according to the Parkinson’s Action Network, the Parkinson’s Disease Foun-

dation, the National Parkinson Foundation, the American Parkinson Disease Association

and the National Institutes of Health, there are over one million Americans diagnosed

with Parkinson’s disease; and

WHEREAS, symptoms include slowness, tremor, difficulty with balance and speaking,

rigidity, cognitive and memory problems; and

WHEREAS, although new medicines and therapies may enhance life for some time for

people with Parkinson’s, more work is needed for a cure; and

WHEREAS, increased education and research are needed to help find more effective

treatments with less side effects and ultimately a cure for Parkinson’s disease; and

WHEREAS, a multidisciplinary approach to Parkinson’s disease care includes local Well-

ness, Support, and Caregiver Groups; and

Sample Proclamation

21

Parkinson’s Awareness 

Month Toolkit

APRIL 2011 

one community

working for a cure

Spreading the Word… 

Focus the media on PD!  Use our press releases, statistics



and tips to help you tell your story. 

Make Parkinson’s Awareness Month official in your state 



or city, using a sample proclamation from the toolkit.

Hang up posters from PDF around your community to 



publicize the need for a cure.

Educating Yourself & Others...

Shatter the myths of PD by participating in our video and



photo campaign at www.pdf.org/parkinson_awareness.

Join PDF’s PD ExpertBriefing,“What’s in the Parkinson’s



Pipeline?” by phone or online, on Tuesday, April 12.

Bring the Parkinson’s Quilt to your community, by renting



an 8’ by 8’ block to show the impact of PD. 

Supporting the Cure...

Raise funds for research by joining our “30 in 30” Parkin-



son’s Awareness Month Event Challenge.  Sign up to hold

your own fundraising event in April, whether it’s a bake

sale, a walk or a 5K run and we’ll help you do it!  Visit

www.pdf.org/ pdf_champion.

Set up your own web page in honor of someone who lives



with PD.  Visit www.pdf.org/pdf_champion. 

Purchase the official PDF Parkinson’s Awareness Month T-



Shirt at www.pdf. org/shop.

(800) 457-6676  

|

www.pdf.org/parkinson_awareness

|

info@pdf.org

Order your free toolkit today.


PA R K I N S O N ’ S   D I S E AS E   F OU N DAT I O N

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    3

N E W S   &   R E V I E W                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

S P R I N G   2 011

seen several of her loved ones live

with the disease.  But she was unsure

at that time as to what form her ca-

reer would take.  After receiving a

bachelor’s degree in neuroscience, she

went on to complete a master’s degree

in Health Science at Johns Hopkins

University, where her focus was on

mental health, aging and neurodegen-

erative disease.

Her office-mate, a Parkinson’s

nurse specialist named Lisette

Bunting-Perry, Ph.D., suggested that

Dr. Vaughan apply for the PDF grant

to take advantage of an opening at the

University of Pennsylvania Parkin-

son’s Disease and Movement Disor-

ders Center, in Philadelphia, PA, on a

study looking at the long-term effects

of deep brain stimulation (DBS).  (Dr.

Bunting-Perry, a leader in nursing edu-

cation, recently helped to develop an

online nursing course in Parkinson’s,

offered by PDF in collaboration with

other PD organizations.)

Dr. Vaughan was accepted and

spent the summer of 2002 examining

people living with Parkinson’s who

had undergone DBS, and interviewing

them about their post-surgery experi-

ence.  During her time at Penn, she

worked with several leaders in the

Parkinson’s field, including her mentor

Andrew D. Siderowf, M.D., whose lat-

est study on cognitive testing for

Parkinson’s was published on the PDF

website just a few months ago.

And where did Dr. Vaughan end



Supported by PDF

on

on Research

Research

Christina Vaughan, 

M.D., M.H.S.

Christina Vaughan, M.D.,

M.H.S., has come full circle as a

member of the Parkinson’s Disease

Foundation (PDF)

team.  In her cur-

rent role as an ad-

visor to the PDF

HelpLine, Dr.

Vaughan — a

post-doctoral Fel-

low in movement

disorders at Rush

University Med-

ical Center in Chicago — helps to an-

swer unusual and difficult questions

about Parkinson’s disease (PD) and

keeps our staff updated on new devel-

opments in research and care.

But when Dr. Vaughan first came

to PDF nine years ago, it was as an ap-

plicant for one of our Summer Student

Fellowships.  This program funds stu-

dents at several levels, from advanced

undergraduates to graduate and med-

ical students, to pursue Parkinson’s-re-

lated summer research projects under

the guidance of leaders in the field.

Dr. Vaughan already had a per-

sonal interest in Parkinson’s, having

up?  She maintained the focus on men-

tal health that she began while at Hop-

kins, but is now combining this

expertise with her knowledge of PD.

Following the completion of her med-

ical degree and a residency in neurology

at the University of Pittsburgh, she

moved to Rush (which is one of PDF’s

research centers), where she is training

to be a Parkinson’s specialist with a spe-

cial interest in the mental health of peo-

ple with Parkinson’s.

As PDF Scientific Director Stanley

Fahn, M.D., noted last year, “We need

to be sure that the best talent is at-

tracted to the challenge of solving

Parkinson’s and helping those who live

with it.”  With doctors like Dr. Vaughan

on board, we are hopeful for the future.

Dr. Vaughan still remembers her

PDF summer fellowship.  She says it,

“opened up opportunities to work with

some of the best Parkinson’s researchers

and to have a very meaningful clinical

experience with people living with

Parkinson’s.”  She also noted that

“while my plan to pursue neurology

and movement disorders was first in-

spired by my family members with

Parkinson’s, this fellowship definitely

helped to strengthen that plan.”

Dr. Vaughan’s 2002 fellowship

was supported by PDF’s Summer 

Student Fellowships program, which

in 2010 supported 15 individuals with

$45,000 in funding.  PDF’s grant to

Rush University in 2010 totaled 

over $300,000.

Dr. Christina Vaughan

C

REATE A

P

ARKINSON



S

L

EGACY

Become a member of The James Parkinson Legacy Society



Combine your charitable giving with your estate and financial planning goals

Benefit from a substantial tax deduction



Receive guaranteed income for the rest of your life



By opening a charitable gift annuity or including PDF as part of your

estate plan you will:

(800) 457-6676

|

www.pdf.org

|

info@pdf.org

4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

PA R K I N S O N ’ S   D I S E AS E   F OU N DAT I O N

N E W S   &   R E V I E W

S P R I N G   2 011



By Janna Dutton, J.D.

For people with Parkinson’s dis-

ease (PD) and their families who are

thinking about the possible need for

long-term medical

care, it is important

to understand what

help may be avail-

able through Medi-

caid.  As we have

mentioned in previ-

ous installments of

this four-part series

covering legal is-

sues and Parkinson’s, long-term care

includes not just the services of a skilled

nursing facility, but such resources as

assisted-living communities and the in-

home aides who can help you with per-

sonal needs such as dressing, shopping,

eating and cooking.  The term can also

include community services.

Medicaid, which is funded jointly

by federal and state governments, is

separate from Medicare, the program

for older Americans.  Medicaid helps

people with few financial resources to

pay for medical care and can pay for

long-term care services.  Determining

eligibility for Medicaid, however, is

complex, and varies from state to state.

In general, to be eligible you will need

to show family income below a certain

level, but there are provisions to enable

you to keep certain assets without los-

ing eligibility. 

In the last three issues in this se-

ries, we reported on the importance of

long-term care, and delegating deci-

sions for health care and financial mat-

ters.  In this final article, we discuss the

basics of eligibility for long-term care

under Medicaid.  If you think that you

may need help in paying for long-term

care in the future, it is best to begin in-

vestigating Medicaid now.  By plan-

ning ahead, you also can help ensure

that your assets are protected. 



General Eligibility

The federal government establishes

general guidelines for Medicaid.  In

general, in all states, to be eligible for

Medicaid coverage of long-term care in

a nursing home, assisted living, or in-

home program, you must be:

  over the age of 65, or disabled



  able to show that you do not have

enough income to pay for your

needed care

  able to show that you have not



made a non-allowable transfer of 

assets during a certain period of

time before your application (see 

details below)

One of the most important things

to understand about Medicaid is that

each state administers its own Medi-

caid program.  Because of this, the

services that are covered by Medicaid

vary significantly from state to state —

as do the income limits that are used to

establish eligibility for the program.   

In most states, as long as your ac-

countable monthly income — that is,

your net income after adjustment for

certain allowable deductions — is less

than the cost of your care, you will be

eligible for Medicaid.  Be aware that

there are ways to protect certain as-

sets to ensure you can provide for

your needs and those of your family

without losing your eligibility. 



Supporting Your Spouse

If you bring in most of the house-

hold income, and also need nursing

home care, the eligibility rules will usu-

ally allow you to give some portion of

your income to supporting your spouse

who is still living at home.  A spouse

who lives at home is called, in legal

terms, a “community spouse” (here-

inafter described simply as “spouse”).  

The rules will also allow you to

take a deduction for the funds you

have set aside for your spouse if he or

she qualifies for it.  



Allowable Assets

Some types of property are consid-

ered exempt from consideration for

Medicaid eligibility.  These include:

  $2,000 in a bank account, for the



purchase of clothing and other items

  Homestead property (this helps pro-



tect your home, but in some cases

the equity protected is limited)  

  Personal effects and household goods



  Automobile worth $4,500 or less (if

needed for medical transportation,

modified, or for employment, the 

allowance is higher) 

  Burial plot, tangible burial items and



exempt prepaid burial arrangements

  An asset allowance for your spouse



(calculating the amount allowed is

complicated and varies by state)



Transferring Assets

Medicaid programs have regula-

tions about how you can transfer funds

to others without putting your eligibil-

ity at risk, and recent legislation has

made these regulations more stringent.

For example, under the new law, the

“look-back” for Medicaid eligibility is

60 months.  This means that if today

you are applying for Medicaid to cover

long-term care, you must report on

what you have done with your assets

during the last five years. 

This provision is designed to make

sure that people do not give away as-

sets to make themselves eligible for

Medicaid.  If this review shows that

you have made what is called a “non-

allowable transfer” of funds or assets,

you might be denied eligibility for




Yüklə 1,38 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə