Fauna and Fauna Assemblages Survey of the Kundip and Trilogy Study Sites



Yüklə 9,77 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/10
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü9,77 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Fauna and Fauna Assemblages Survey of the Kundip and Trilogy Study Sites 
 
C:\Documents and Settings\Kim Bennett\My Documents\Tectonic\Phillips River Gold Project  NOI\EPBC 
Referral\Hopetoun Fauna.doc 
 
54
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
A
AA
p
pp
p
pp
e
ee
n
nn
d
dd
i
ii
x
xx
 
  
2
22
 
  
Records from WA
Museum database search

Fauna and Fauna Assemblages Survey of the Kundip and Trilogy Study Sites 
 
C:\Documents and Settings\Kim Bennett\My Documents\Tectonic\Phillips River Gold Project  NOI\EPBC 
Referral\Hopetoun Fauna.doc 
 
56
 
Amphibia collected between 
-33.659632, 120.174566 and -33.696645, 120.216496 
 
Myobatrachidae 
Crinia pseudinsignifera 
Pseudophryne guentheri 
 
Reptiles collected between 
-33.659632, 120.174566 and -33.696645, 120.216496 
 
 
 
Agamidae 
Ctenophorus maculatus griseus 
 
Gekkonidae 
Crenadactylus ocellatus ocellatus 
 
Scincidae 
Ctenotus labillardieri 
Hemiergis peronii peronii 
Lerista viduata 
 
 
 
Mammals collected between 
-33.659632, 120.174566 and -33.696645, 120.216496 
 
Macropodidae 
Macropus eugenii derbianus 
 
Muridae 
Rattus fuscipes 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
A
AA
p
pp
p
pp
e
ee
n
nn
d
dd
i
ii
x
xx
 
  
3
33
 
  
Records from
CALM rare fauna
database search

Fauna and Fauna Assemblages Survey of the Kundip and Trilogy Study Sites 
 
C:\Documents and Settings\Kim Bennett\My Documents\Tectonic\Phillips River Gold Project  NOI\EPBC 
Referral\Hopetoun Fauna.doc 
 
58
 
 
 
 
 

Fauna and Fauna Assemblages Survey of the Kundip and Trilogy Study Sites 
 
C:\Documents and Settings\Kim Bennett\My Documents\Tectonic\Phillips River Gold Project  NOI\EPBC 
Referral\Hopetoun Fauna.doc 
 
59
 
 
 
 
 

Fauna and Fauna Assemblages Survey of the Kundip and Trilogy Study Sites 
 
C:\Documents and Settings\Kim Bennett\My Documents\Tectonic\Phillips River Gold Project  NOI\EPBC 
Referral\Hopetoun Fauna.doc 
 
60
 
 
 
 
 

Fauna and Fauna Assemblages Survey of the Kundip and Trilogy Study Sites 
 
C:\Documents and Settings\Kim Bennett\My Documents\Tectonic\Phillips River Gold Project  NOI\EPBC 
Referral\Hopetoun Fauna.doc 
 
61
 
 
 
 

L
EVEL 
1
 
B
IOLOGICAL 
A
SSESSMENT OF 
R
AVENSTHORPE 
G
OLD 
C
OPPER 
P
ROJECT
,
 
W
ESTERN 
A
USTRALIA
 
 
ACH
 
M
INERALS 
P
TY LTD
 
 
 
A
PPENDIX 
3:
 
2005
 
B
IOTA 
B
IOLOGICAL 
S
URVEY 
R
EPORT
 
 

 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 
     
    
    
    
    
    
   1
4 View S
treet 
Nth P
ert
h W
A  
60
06
 
f: 
(0
8) 
93
28
 61
38
 
t: (08
) 93
28 19
00 
e: b
iota@
biot
a.
net.
au
 
ab
n: 49 09
2 68

119 
13 January 2005 
 
Ms. Kim Bennett 
Environmental Manager 
Tectonic Resources NL 
Suite 4, 100 Hay Street 
Subiaco  WA  6008 
 
 
Dear Kim 
Kundip Phase II Fauna Survey - Summary of Findings 
Introduction 
Tectonic Resources NL, as owners of the Phillips River Gold Project, aim to 
develop the gold/copper resource at the Kundip site and the polymetallic resource 
at the Trilogy site, located 17 and 27 kilometres southeast of Ravensthorpe 
respectively.  An open cut pit is planned for the Trilogy deposit, whilst 
underground mining and an open cut pits are planned for the deposits at Kundip.   
 
This letter summarises the findings of Phase I of the fauna survey, documented in 
greater detail in Biota (2004), and provides an overview of Phase II highlighting 
the key findings, particularly in respect of small mammal captures. 
 
Fauna Survey Phase I 
A field survey was conducted over a 10-day period between the 5/1/2004 and 
14/1/2004, following a 12-month period of slightly above average rainfall, though 
this was preceded by an extended dry period. 
 
The methodology utilised during the survey is described in Biota (2004). 
 
The field survey recorded a combined total of 99 vertebrate species, including 62 
species of bird, 11 native mammals, two introduced mammals, 21 reptiles and 
three frogs. 
 
Over 30 invertebrate taxa were recorded from the Kundip study site, many of 
which were not identified beyond family level.  Two species of mygalomorph 
spiders from the family Nemesiidae were recorded from the Kundip project area; 
Aname mainae and Chenistonia tepperi.  Both species (as they are currently 
recognised) have broad distributions through the South-west of WA.  A single 
Bothriembryon that was not known to Ms Shirley Slack-Smith (WA Museum) was 
collected during the survey from leaf litter at KU8.  The conservation status of 
this taxon is unknown. 
 
A search of the CALM Schedule and Priority Fauna database for species potentially 
occurring in the area yielded five Schedule 1 species, one Schedule 4 species and 
five Priority species.  An additional Schedule 1, Schedule 4 and Priority taxon may 
occur in the area based on other information.  
 
Schedule 1 Fauna 
•  *Carnaby’s Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris (Endangered under EPBC Act 
1999

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 

•  Western Ground Parrot Pezoporus wallicus flaviventris (Endangered under 
EPBC Act 1999
•  *Malleefowl Leipoa ocellata (Vulnerable under EPBC Act 1999
•  Chuditch Dasyurus geoffroyii (Vulnerable under EPBC Act 1999
•  Dibbler Parantechinus apicalis (Endangered under EPBC Act 1999
•  Heath Rat Pseudomys shortridgei (Vulnerable under EPBC Act 1999
 
Schedule 4 Fauna 
•  Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus 
•  Carpet Python Morethia spilota imbricata 
 
Priority Taxa 
•  *Lerista viduata (Priority 1) 
•  Quenda Isoodon obesulus fusciventer (Conservation Dependent, Priority 4) 
•  Tammar Macropus eugenii derbianus (Conservation Dependent, Priority 4) 
•  *Western Whipbird (southern WA subspecies) Psophodes nigrogularis oberon 
(Priority 4) (Vulnerable under EPBC Act 1999) 
•  Western Mouse Pseudomys occidentalis (Priority 4) 
•  *Western Brush Wallaby Macropus irma (Priority 4) 
 
Species noted with an “*” were recorded during the Phase I survey. 
 
Given the number of fauna of Conservation Significance that may occur in the 
project area it was recommended that: 
 
1. 
The proponent should undertake an additional seasonal survey of the 
project area to more fully document the faunal assemblage and identify any 
additional constraints.  This study could usefully target threatened fauna 
taxa not well represented during the current survey including Schedule 
listed rodent and bird species. 
 
Of particular consideration was the possible presence of the Heath Rat Pseudomys 
shortridgei and the population size of the Western Whipbird Psophodes nigrogularis 
oberon.  
 
Overall captures of rodents (even potentially abundant species such as Rattus fuscipes
was low, possibly reflecting a poor season.  It was felt that if rodent numbers were 
generally low as was suggested by the trapping data (and comparisons to other studies 
(Chapman and Craig 1998, Chapman 2000)) then the chance of detecting rarer species 
such as the Heath Rat was greatly diminished. 
 
It was agreed that the results of the seasonal survey could be written as a brief letter 
style report to be appended to the original report. 
 
Fauna Survey Phase II 
 
Methodology 
The Phase II survey was completed between 16/11/04 – 23/11/04 and involved Dr. 
Michael Craig (Biota), Mr. Greg Harold (Consultant) and Mr. Andy Chapman 
(Consultant).  The aim of the Phase II survey was to target threatened fauna taxa not 
well represented during the Phase 1 survey, including Scheduled rodent and bird 
species (see Biota 2004). 
 
Minimum temperatures during the survey ranged form 4.0°C to 19.2°C and maximum 
temperatures ranged from 18.0°C to 37.4°C (Table 1).  No rainfall was recorded during 
the survey but 27.9 mm had fallen in November 2004 prior to the survey. 

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 

Table 1: 
The minimum and maximum daily temperatures recorded in 
Ravensthorpe for the duration of the Phase II survey (compared to the 
November average minimum of 10.9 and average maximum of 24.8). 
Date 
16/11 17//11 18/11 19/11 20/11 21/11 22/11 23/11 Mean 
Minimum 
14.3 
12.1 4.0 5.2 8.7 10.4 
14.4 
19.2 
11.0 
Maximum 
31.2 20.5  18.0 21.8 26.8 29.3 33.4 37.4 27.3 
 
The survey re-opened the seven systematic trapping grids (KU1 – KU7) and the cage 
transect (KU11) established during Phase I, and established an additional seven Elliott 
transects comprising 20 Elliott traps spaced approximately 10 m apart (KU14 – KU20) 
(Figure 1).   
 
All grids were open for between five and seven nights giving a total trap effort of 1780 
Elliott trap nights, 588 pit-trap nights and 224 cage trap nights (Table 2).  An additional 
cage trap was added to each of the systematic trapping sites (i.e. KU1 – KU7). 
 
Systematic avifauna censusing was not undertaken as part of this current survey, rather 
effort focussed on recording the distribution of the Western Whipbird Psophodes 
nigrogularis oberon and other Threatened or Rare taxa.  However, notes were made of 
species additional to those recorded during Phase I (see Results and Discussion below).  
A total of 23 hours was spent conducting transects through all of the proposed pit and 
overburden areas to record the presence of threatened bird species (Figure 2). 
 
Opportunistic collecting was also undertaken at locations likely to support fauna of 
conservation significance including Short Range Endemics. 
Table 2: 
Trapping grid location and trap effort (WGS84 datum, Zone 51). 
Site # 
Location 
(AMG) 
Trap 
Type 
Date 
Opened 
Date 
Closed 
Nights 
Open 
# of 
traps 
Total effort 
 (trap nights) 
KU1 239670mE 
6270247mN 
Elliott 
Pit 
Cage 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 



20 
12 

140 
84 

KU2 240563mE 
6271172mN 
Elliott 
Pit 
Cage 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 



20 
12 

140 
84 

KU3 240342mE 
6269570mN 
Elliott 
Pit 
Cage 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 



20 
12 

140 
84 

KU4 240288mE 
6268814mN 
Elliott 
Pit 
Cage 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 



20 
12 

140 
84 

KU5 239894mE 
6268754mN 
Elliott 
Pit 
Cage 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 



20 
12 

140 
84 

KU6 240113mE 
6270410mN 
Elliott 
Pit 
Cage 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 



20 
12 

140 
84 

KU7 239820mE 
6269724mN 
Elliott 
Pit 
Cage 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
16/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 
23/11/04 



20 
12 

140 
84 

KU11 Transect 
Cage 16/11/04 
23/11/04 

25 
175 
KU14 239369mE 
6270241mN 
to 
239372mE 
6270120mN 
Elliott 17/11/04 23/11/04 

20 
120 

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 

 
KU15 240229mE 
6270175mN 
to 
239996mE 
6270079mN 
Elliott 17/11/04 23/11/04 

20 
120 
KU16 240744mE 
6270798mN 
to 
240821mE 
6270613mN 
Elliott 17/11/04 23/11/04 

20 
120 
KU17 240897mE 
6268881mN 
to 
240888mE 
6268711mN 
Elliott 17/11/04 23/11/04 

20 
120 
KU18 241007mE 
6268894mN 
to 
241010mE 
6268707mN 
Elliott 17/11/04 23/11/04 

20 
120 
KU19 241222mE 
6270367mN 
to 
241236mE 
6270179mN 
Elliott 18/11/04 23/11/04 

20 
100 
KU20 239131mE 
6269112mN 
to 
239025mE 
6269332mN 
Elliott 18/11/04 23/11/04 

20 
100 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Elliott 
Pit 
Cage 
1780 
588 
224 
 
The new Elliott transects were placed in the following vegetation communities: 
 
 
KU14 & 15 – Melaleuca acuminata Open woodland and thicket (dense to mid-
dense shrubs <2m) along drainage lines. 
 KU16 
– 
Melaleuca stramentosa Mallee and dense heath (shrubs <2m). 
 
KU17 – From a mixture of Eucalyptus clivicola Low Forest and Eucalyptus cernua 
Dense Low Forest (mallee regrowth) into Melaleuca rigidifolia Open Mallee and 
Dense Heath (shrubs <1m). 
 KU18 
– 
Melaleuca rigidifolia Open Mallee and Dense Heath (shrubs <1m). 
 KU19 
– 
Banksia lehmanniana Open Mallee and Thicket/Scrub Heath (dense to 
open shrubs 0.5-5m). 
 
KU20 – From Banksia lehmanniana Open Mallee and Thicket/Scrub Heath (dense 
to open shrubs 0.5-5m) into Melaleuca hamata Mallee. 
 

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 

 
 
 
Figure 1. A map showing the location of the trapping sites and trapping 
transects overlain on vegetation communities.  KU14 – KU20 represent an 
additional seven Elliot transect lines established for the phase II survey. 
 

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 

 
 
Figure 2. A map shown the location of transects conducted for threatened bird 
species in relation to the proposed pit and overburden areas. Each colour 
represents a different day. 

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 

Results and Discussion 
 
The phase II survey recorded 37 vertebrate species including five mammals, nine birds 
(Tables 4, 5 and 6).  Note that for the avifauna, only threatened taxa and species 
additional to those recorded during Phase I (Biota 2004) were recorded. 
 
The tally included 11 species not recorded during the Phase I survey, highlighting the 
value of seasonal work.  The additional species comprised Amphibolurus norrisi
Elapognathus coronatusRamphotyphlops australisTiliqua occipitalis, the Little Eagle 
Aquila morphnoides, Brown Falcon Falco berigora, Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo 
Chrysococcyx basalis, Rufous Fieldwren Calamanthus campestris, Western Spinebill 
Acanthorhynchus superciliosus, White-cheeked Honeyeater Phylidonyris nigra and 
White-winged Triller Lalage tricolor.  None of the additional species recorded are of 
special conservation significance, however the record of Amphibolurus norrisi extends 
further westward (by approximately 30 km) the known distribution of this species. 
 
Of particular note was the increase in captures of rodent species (Table 5), though this 
can be explained, for the most part, by the inclusion of additional Elliott transects.  
During Phase I, six Mus musculus (House Mouse) and 12 Rattus fuscipes (Bush Rat) 
were recorded from the seven trapping grids (KU1 – KU7), with an additional four R. 
fuscipes recorded from cage traps (KU11).  During Phase II, nine M. musculus and 18 R. 
fuscipes were recorded from the seven trapping grids (KU1 – KU7), with an additional 
13 M. musculus and 130 R. fuscipes recorded from the Elliott transects (KU14 – KU20). 
 
In comparison, Chapman (2000) documented 211 records of Mus musculus and 147 
records of Rattus fuscipes using 480 pit-trap nights, 1000 Elliott trap nights and 200 
cage trap nights across spring 1999 and autumn 2000 at Bandalup Hill.  With respect to 
the rarer species, Chapman (2000) documented 17 records of the Western Mouse 
Pseudomys occidentalis (Southern Mouse) and five records of the Heath Rat Pseudomys 
shortridgei (Heath Rat). 
 
At the same study site in spring 2000, Biota (2000) recorded six M. musculus and 39 R. 
fuscipes using 534 pit-nights, 1100 Elliott trap nights and 60 cage trap nights.  They 
also recorded one Pseudomys albocinereus (Ash-grey Mouse), two P. occidentalis and 
one P. shortridgei (Table 5).   
 
The capture success of other small ground mammals during the current Phase II was 
comparable to Phase I of the trapping program at Kundip: three captures of 
Sminthopsis griseoventer (Grey-bellied Dunnart) versus nine during phase 1; 59 
captures of Cercartetus concinnus (Western Pygmy Possum) versus 56 during Phase I; 
and 71 captures of Tarsipes rostratus (Honey Possum) versus 84 during Phase 1. 
 
Despite being recorded in Phase I, neither the Malleefowl Leipoa ocellata (Schedule 1)
Western Brush Wallaby Macropus irma (Priority 4) nor Lerista viduata (Priority 1) were 
recorded during Phase II.  Vehicle transects were conducted for the former two of these 
species and raking of leaf litter and debris was undertaken for L. viduata
 
As noted above, additional effort was directed towards documenting the occurrence of 
Western Whipbirds and other rare birds in the project area.   
 
• 
Western Whipbird Psophodes nigrogularis oberon (Priority 4 under Wildlife 
Conservation Act 1998 (WA); Vulnerable under the EPBC Act 1999 (Cth)) 
We recorded this species on 12 occasions from four different vegetation types 
(Figure 3).  Most records (eight) were from Banksia lemanniana (Bl) open mallee 
and thicket scrub/heath.  There were two records from Melaleuca rigidifolia open 
mallee and dense heath with single records from each of Melaleuca stramentosa 

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 

(Ms) mallee and dense heath and Banksia media open mallee and scrub heath 
(Figure 3).  This compares to six records across sites KU1 (Banksia media open 
mallee and scrub heath) KU2 (Banksia lemanniana open mallee and thicket/scrub 
heath) and KU3 (Melaleuca hamata mallee-heath).
  
Table 3. 
Home range estimates for the subspecies of the Western Whipbird. 
Subspecies 
Home range estimate 
(ha) 
Reference 
oberon 
6.45* Cody 
1991 
oberon 
10.53* Cody 
1991 
nigrogularis 
12.6 Smith 
1991 

2.8 to 5.6 
Serventy & Whittell 1976 
leucogaster 
<20 
Woinarski et al. 1988 
* estimated from densities 
 
None of the Western Whipbird records fell within the proposed impact areas (i.e. 
pit and overburden stockpiles).  However, the impact area does intersect two (Bl 
and Ms) of the four vegetation types from which this species was recorded, with 
an overall loss of 47ha of the total 235.42ha mapped for these two vegetation 
types within the project area (Table 7).  Given a typical territory size of between 
7ha and 10ha (see Table 3), the worst case scenario would be that either (1) 
between 5 and 7 pairs may be lost assuming only vegetation types in which they 
were recorded were suitable, or (2) between 8 and 12 pairs if all vegetation types 
are suitable.  However, there are several reasons to believe that the actual 
number is likely to be lower than this.  Firstly, no Western Whipbirds were 
recorded from any of the proposed pit or overburden areas during the Phase II 
survey.  While a short survey of that kind does not indicate that whipbirds are not 
present in those areas, it does suggest that they are likely to be present at lower 
than average densities.  Secondly, a large proportion of the northern and central 
pit areas are already heavily disturbed or cleared of their natural vegetation.  
Therefore, we would expect whipbirds to occur only marginally in both of these 
areas.  Lastly, most of the records during Phase II are from Banksia lemanniana 
(Bl) open mallee and thicket scrub/heath which will not be heavily disturbed 
(Table 7) and densities are likely to be lower than average in most of the other 
habitats. 
 
The call from this species is conspicuous and may carry up to 200m (Johnstone 
and Storr 2004).  The diet comprises invertebrates, mainly insects (Higggins and 
Peter 2002), but also snails (Johnstone and Storr 2004).  The species is 
considered to be sedentary remaining in its home range from year to year 
(Higgins and Peter 2002). 
 
The taxonomy surrounding the geographical variation in this species is not fully 
understood (Higgins and Peter 2002; cf. Johnstone and Storr 2004; see also 
Schodde and Mason 1999).  Higgins and Peter (2002) recognise four subspecies 
of P. nigrogularis with two of these, P. n. nigrogularis and P. n. oberon, occurring 
in Western Australia.  In contrast, Johnstone and Storr (2004) do not recognise P. 
n. oberon, rather treat all WA specimens as P. n. nigrogularis.  Schodde and 
Mason (1999) elevate P. n. nigrogularis to full species and treats oberon as a 
sub-species of the newly recognised P. leucogaster.  Both the State and 
Commonwealth listings recognise the taxonomy presented by Higgins and Peter 
(2002) as does this document.
 
P. n. nigrogularis has the same conservation 
significance under both State and Federal listings.  It is listed as Endangered 
under the EPBC Act 1999 and as Schedule 1 (Vulnerable) under the Wildlife 
Conservation Notice 2003.  The State and Federal listings do not, however, 

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 

recognise the same level of conservation significance for P. n. oberon.  According 
to State listings P. n. oberon is listed as Priority 4 i.e. 
 
Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed, or 
for which sufficient knowledge is available, and which are 
considered not currently threatened or in need of special 
protection, but could be if present circumstances change.  These 
taxa are usually represented on conservation lands. 
 
whilst the Commonwealth listing recognises P. n. oberon as Vulnerable. 
 
Johnstone and Storr (2004) consider the western whipbird in WA to be 
uncommon to moderately common in the east of its range (i.e. about 
Ravensthorpe).  There are no estimates of population size in WA though Teale et 
al. (in prep.) have compiled 165 records from 76 sites across the Fitzgerald 
Biosphere Reserve. 
 

  
13-Jan-05 
 
 
 
 
Cube:Current:250 (Hopetoun Fauna):Doc:Phase II:Fauna Survey Phase II Letter Report B.doc 
10 
 
 


Yüklə 9,77 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə