English sport vocabulary which most used in our daily life both in English and Uzbek?



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English sport vocabulary which most used in our daily life both in English and Uzbek?


Sport or sports?
1. sport (noun, uncountable): Sam loves sport.
2. sports (noun, countable): Sam plays two sports: football and tennis.
3. sports (adjective): Sam reads the sports news every day.

General Sports Words

Sports vs. Sport That’s right: the language barrier starts with what to call the whole category of athletics. Americans watch sports. British folk watch sport. We’ve got a lot of ground to cover.

Game vs. Match The Super Bowl is also called “the Big Game.” We can only assume a British championship would be called “the Oversized Match.”

Team vs. Club “My favorite football team is the Raiders,” says an Oaklander. “My football club is the Gunners,” says a Brit rooting for Arsenal (though someone from a rival team might call them “Gooners”). Another British football quirk: many fans call their teams—er, clubs—by nicknames rather than their official titles.

Defense vs. Defence It means the same thing: the opposite of “offense” (or if you’re in the U.K., “offence”). British English just spells some things differently. (Want more British spelling variations? Learn about canceled vs. cancelled, favorite vs. favourite, and other ways our Englishes are different.)

Zero-zero vs. Nil-nil If both teams have good defense, the score might be zero-zero. But if they have good defence (note the British spelling), then the score will be nil-nil.

Shutout vs. Clean Sheet In the U.S., a “shutout” is a game in which one team doesn’t score at all. In the U.K., the goalkeeper (not goalie) is said to “keep a clean sheet” if he’s kept the other team’s score at nil.

Tie vs. Draw It could be zero-zero, nil-nil, or ten-ten (no changes there); if both teams have the same score at the end of the game, that’s called a “tie” for Americans and a “draw” for the British.

Field vs. Pitch The thing you play on, if you’re playing in the U.S., is a field. In the U.K., it’s a pitch—not to be confused by what a baseball pitcher (bowler) throws at a batter (batsman) in the game of baseball (that one’s still baseball, though Brits prefer cricket).

Sideline vs. Touchline Either type of line designates the boundaries of the field. Idiom bonus: if a player is unable to play, you can say “that player has been sidelined.”

Football Words

Soccer vs. Football When Americans hear “football,” we think tackling, touchdowns, oval ball with pointy ends. When Brits (or really, anyone not from the U.S.) hear “football”—sometimes abbreviated to “footy”—they think fancy footwork, goals, round ball. In other words, what Americans call “soccer.” Fancy that.

Pig skin This word has no British equivalent. In American football, it’s what you call the actual ball. If you didn’t know that, “tossing around the pigskin” probably sounds pretty gross.

Gridiron For Americans, a gridiron is the field for football—so called because of the parallel lines marking up the grass. But British folks sometimes use the word “gridiron” to refer to the sport of American football as a whole. It rolls off the tongue nicer than “American football,” after all.

In the Six In soccer, some American commentators say “in the six” to refer to action in the six-yard box—that is, the area immediately around the goal. Not to be confused with…

Pick Six This term is specific to American football—that is, gridiron. It’s what happens when a quarterback throws an interception (or “pick”) and the defensive player throws it back, scoring a touchdown worth six points.

On Frame This is a football Britishism meaning “on target”—for example, a kick straight into the goal would be “on frame.” Americans don’t get it: in the words of one Florida-based soccer blogger, “For me it sounds like hitting the post or the crossbar, I wouldn’t think it was a shot on target.”

Upper 90 vs. Top Corner In soccer, this term refers to the top portion of the goal. American commentators refer to the right angle as the “upper 90” (as in, 90 degrees), and British ones content themselves with describing the general region.

Sporting Equipment

Uniform vs. Kit What you wear to show what team (or club) you’re on.

Cleats vs. Boots (studs) These are what you put on your feet to run in turf. Americans refer to the shoes in general as “cleats,” but the actual cleats are the grippy bits on the sole. The grippy bits in British English: “studs.”

Sneakers vs. Trainers More on footwear: a good running shoe without the studs (or grippy bits) is called a “sneaker” in the U.S.; the British aren’t as big on sneaking, so for them, they’re called “trainers.”

Mouth Guard vs. Gum Shield You’d think that teeth would be more injury-prone. But if you’re in Britain, you protect your gums.

Words for the Fans

Remember this sentence? “A Yank may queue for gridiron and go barmy in the stands as if he’s got bugger all to do but watch the match, but lads from Blighty think that’s bollocks.” Let’s finish translating the Britishisms.



Yank An American. Think “Yankee.”

Queue This is what you stand in while you’re waiting to get into the stadium. Or the bathroom. Or if you want fries and beer (or at a British match, chips and a pint).

Barmy “Crazy.” Not necessarily certifiably insane, just a bit on the loony side.

Bugger All This translates to “nothing at all,” but be careful where you say it: it’s a bit vulgar as a phrase. You’re probably ok saying it on the soccer pitch, though.

Lads Let’s not stereotype: there are plenty of lasses (or girls) who are just as excited about a good day of sport. But say you’re with a group of fellows. They’d be dudes, guys, or bros in the U.S., but in the U.K., you’d call them “my lads.”

Blighty An affectionate term for England herself. The term showed up as a sign of patriotism and homesickness at the time of Victorian rule in India and grew in popularity in the early twentieth century, with songs like “Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty” causing a tear in many a homesick soldier’s eye.

Bollocks “Nonsense!”

A lot of these words might sound like bollocks to American ears, but if you ever find yourself at a footy match in the U.K.—or are trying to explain gridiron to a lad from Blighty—now you’ll know where to start. Let the games begin!



We use either the verb to play, to do or to go to refer to sports.

A

aerobics


arena

arrow


athlete

athletics



B

badminton

ball

baseball


basketball

bat


baton

bicycle


bicycling

bike


biking

billiards

boomerang

boules


bow

bowling


boxer

boxing


bronze medal

bunt


C

catch


catcher

champion


championship

club


coach

compete


competing

competition

competitor

cycle


cycling

cyclist


D

defense


diamond

discus


dive

diver


E

exercise


F

fencing


field

figure skating

fitness

football


forward

G

game


goal

gold medal

gym

gymnasium



gymnast

gymnastics



H

halftime


handball

high jump

hitter

hockey


hole-in-one

home


home team

I

ice skating

infield

J

jog


jogger

judo


jump

jumper


jumping

K

karate


kickball

kite


kung fu

L

league


long jump

lose


loser

luge


lutz

M

major league

martial arts

mat


medal

minor league

move

movement


MVP

N

net


O

offense


Olympics

out


outfield

outfielder



P

paddle


parkour

pickleball

pitch

play


player

playing


playoffs

polo


pool

Q

quarter


R

race


racer

racewalking

racing

referee


relay

ride


riding

rink


run

runner


running

S

sailing


score

scoreboard

scuba

scull


sculling

shortstop

shot put

silver medal

skate

skating rink



skeleton

ski


skier

skiing


slalom

sled


sledding

snorkeling

sport

sportsmanship



squashstadium

stick


strike

stroke


swim

swimmer


swimming

T

table tennis

taekwondo

target


team

tennis


trampoline

triathlon



U

umpire


unicycle

uniform


V

vault


vaulter

volley


volley ball

W

walk


walker

walking


water polo

weightlifter

weightlifting

weights


win

winner


winning

World Cup



World Series

English tourism vocabulary which most used in our daily life both in English and Uzbek?

Tourism NOUN the business of providing services for people who are travelling for their holiday

Tourism  NOUN related to tourism

Tourist  NOUN someone who is visiting a place on holiday


agent: one who acts or has the power to act as the representative of another. Most frequently in travel anyone other than a principal, such as a retail travel agent, receiving agent, ticket agent, local operator or wholesaler (usage uncommon in No. America)

airline classes of service: variety of terms used to express a particular type of aircraft cabin service. Classes vary with types of compartments, seating comfort, and amenities, with variation between domestic and international flights, and denoted by a fare code on the ticket.

airline fare: price charged for an airline ticket. Some of the categories are as follows: advance purchase excursion (APEX): heavily discounted excursion fare available on many international routes. Reservations and payment will be required well in advance of departure, with varying penalizes for cancellation; excursion: individual fares that require a round-trip within time limits, discounted from coach fare, limited availability; group: discounts from regular fares for groups; and regular or normal: any unrestricted fare.

All-inclusive: A form of package holiday where the majority of services offered at the destination are included in the price paid prior to departure (e.g. refreshments, excursions, amenities, gratuities, etc).

attraction: a place, event, building or area which tourists want to visit

attraction: a natural or man-made facility, location, or activity which offers items of specific interest to tourists.

back to back: term used to describe tours operating on a consistent, continuing basis, usually without time between.

block: a number of rooms, seats, or space reserved in advance, usually by wholesalers, tour operators, or receptive operators who intend to sell them as components of tour packages.

cafeteria: a food-service operation of a limited menu, in which customers carry their own trays to seating

city guide: a person who has a speciality of guiding in the city only

commission: the percentage of a selling price paid to a retailer by a supplier. In the travel industry, travel agents receive commissions for selling tour packages or other services.

concierge: a hotel employee who handles restaurant and tour reservations, travel arrangements, and other details for hotel guests

costing: the process of itemizing and calculating all costs the tour operator will pay on a given tour. Costing is usually the function of the operations manager.

coupon, tour: a voucher that can be exchanged for a travel product

Cultural tourism: Travel for the purpose of learning about cultures or aspects of cultures.

culture: people's customs, clothing, food, houses, language, dancing, music, drama, literature and religion

Culture: A set of shared norms and values which establish a sense of identity for those who share them. Typically applied at the level of nation and/or race.

Culture: The sum total of ways of living by a group of human beings that is transmitted from one generation to another.

deposit: an advance payment required to obtain confirmed space

Distribution: The process employed to provide customers access to the product. For travel products distribution focuses largely on the ways in which the customer can reserve or purchase the product.

educational tour: tour designed around an educational activity, such as studying art

full house: a hotel with all guest rooms occupied

Globalisation: Generally defined as the network of connections of organisations and peoples are across national, geographic and cultural borders and boundaries. These global networks are creating a shrinking world where local differences and national boundaries are being subsumed into global identities. Within the field of tourism, globalisation is also viewed in terms of the revolutions in telecommunications, finance and transport that are key factors currently influencing the nature and pace of growth of tourism in developing nations.

group leader: an individual, acting as liaison to a tour operator, acts as escort

immigration: the process by which a government official verifies a person’s passport, visa or origin of citizenship

Impacts: Effects, which may be either positive or negative, felt as a result of tourism-associated activity. Tourists have at least three kinds of impacts on a destination: economic, sociocultural and environmental. Tourism also has effects on tourists, in terms of possible attitude and behaviour changes.

IT Number: a registration number that is assigned to a tour package

local: belonging to a particular place or region

Pollution: Harmful effects on the environment as a by-product of tourism activity. Types include: air; noise; water; and aesthetic.

pricing: decision-making process of ascertaining what price to charge for a given tour, once total costs are known. Pricing involves determining the markup, studying the competition, and evaluating the tour value for the price to be charged; function performed by the operations manager.

room service: food or beverages served in a guest’s room

Sales: Revenue from ordinary activities: not necessarily cash.

service: work done for the benefit of another

tour: any pre-arranged journey to one or more destinations

tourism: the all-embracing term for the movement of people to destinations away from their place of residence for any reason other than following an occupation, remunerated from within the country visited, for a period of 24 hours or more

tourist: one who travels for a period of 24 hours or more in a place other than that in which he or she usually resides, whose purpose could be classified as leisure (whether for recreation, health, sport, holiday, study or religion), business, family, mission or meeting

Tourist: Anyone who spends at least one night away from home, no matter what the purpose.

travel agent/agency: a person or firm qualified to arrange for all travel components

visa: stamp of approval recorded in a passport to enter a country for a specific purpose

Visitors: A broader category than 'tourist', includes tourists and same-day visitors.

Visitors: Visitors are persons who undertake tourism as defined above. They are referred to as either tourists (those who stay overnight or longer in the place visited), or same-day visitors.
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