Central projections are projections from one plane to another where the first plane’s point and



Yüklə 135,7 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix02.01.2022
ölçüsü135,7 Kb.
#47017
1   2   3
11.CentralProjections (2)
YaN(1 kurs, mex 2019-2020), Reja Tutash muhit tushunchasi, 19185 Клиник лаборатор ташхислаш ва текшириш усуллари, Mavzu dielektriklar
Solution (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GeoProb4.jpg)


An example of a one point perspective drawing.

An example of a two point perspective drawing.

A perspective drawing is a two dimensional representation of the way in which scene or

object is seen by the eye. This representation, while not perfectly accurate, does give the

effect of foreshortening as the object or lines travel away from the viewer and towards the

vanishing point which coincides with the perception of the ocular nerve endings. In order to

create a perspective, one must possess a top view and a side view of the object or scene.

Through these two views, the perspective can be created by citing each point within the

views. A one-point perspective has four major factors within it. Firstly, the horizon line

establishes the height of the vanishing point. The names of different perspective

constructions (one-point, two-point, and three-point) address how many vanishing points exist

in the particular construction. The second major factor is the ground line, which is in front

view; all objects are created relative to this line. The third major factor is the station point,

Introduction to Perspective




which is the location of the viewer relative to the objects being viewed. The fourth and final

major element of perspective is the picture plane, which is also seen in top view. This is an

imaginary plane perpendicular to the line of sight. The picture plane acts as the two

dimensional surface that all points must be brought to in order to make the two dimensional

perspective. Otherwise, the image would become an axonometric view.

A one-point perspective is a simple representation of a scene or object whose lines are

exactly perpendicular or parallel with the line of vision. That means that it must be

perpendicular or parallel with the picture plane in top view and the ground line as seen in front

view. The perpendicular lines (traveling away from the ground line) will travel toward a

vanishing point (which lies on the horizon line) while the ones parallel to the ground line will

remain at the same degree. The parallel lines however will change positions in the image

depending on how far away from the ground line they are. A line that is five inches away from

the ground line will appear drastically further away in perspective than a line that is one inch

away from the ground line (see Figure 1.1).

Steps to creating a 1-Point Perspective:

1: Cite points along the picture plane and draw vertical construction lines to perspective view.

Then draw construction lines from the side view, parallel to the ground line, and draw passed

the vertical lines in the perspective view.

2: Where the vertical and horizontal lines intersect in the corresponding points to the object

are the points of this plane in perspective. Mark each point.

3: Connect these points after they have been established.

4: Take points that do not lie on the picture plane and draw a line from each of them to the

station point.

5: Where this line crosses the picture plane is the cited point.

6: Draw a vertical line from the cited point down to the perspective view.

7: Now go to the side view. The construction lines that were drawn from it to the perspective

plane (the ones that established the plane that sits on the picture plane) should be a guide.

Take each point as it lies on the plane in construction and project it back to the vanishing

point.

One-Point Perspective




8: Where this line intersect the vertical line is the new point in perspective

9: Do this for all point not lying on the picture plane

10: Connect the appropriate points, understand the depth of the image, and you have a

perspective!

step 1 for constructing a 1- point perspective

final 1- point perspective constructed view

Two-Point Perspective



A two-Point Perspective has the same rules and structure as a one-point perspective,

however, a two-point perspective is seeing an object at an angle not parallel to the picture

plane. This view is much more focused on a corner of the objects as opposed to an entire

side of the objects. Instead of one line receding and the other standing at the same degree,

both sets of lines would vanish to opposite vanishing points.

Instructions to constructing a 2-Point Perspective:

1: Cite points along the picture plane and draw vertical construction lines to perspective view.

Then draw construction lines from the side view, parallel to the ground line, and draw passed

the vertical lines in the perspective view.

2: Where the vertical and horizontal lines intersect in the corresponding points to the object

are the points of this plane in perspective. Mark each point.

3: Connect these points after they have been established.

4: Take points that do not lie on the picture plane and draw a line from each of them to the

station point.

5: Where this line crosses the picture plane is the cited point.

6: Draw a vertical line from the cited point down to the perspective view.

7: Now go to the side view. The construction lines that were drawn from it to the perspective

plane (the ones that established the plane that sits on the picture plane) should be a guide.

Take each point as it lies on the plane in construction and project it back to the respective

vanishing points (the lines at an angle off to the right side of the page will go to the Right

side vanishing point, and likewise the left angled ones will go to the left).

8: Where this line intersect the vertical line is the new point in perspective




Yüklə 135,7 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə