Case Study: Melaleuca cajuputi



Yüklə 5,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü5,54 Mb.

Case Study:   

Melaleuca cajuputi 

(gelam) – a useful species and an option for 

paludiculture in degraded peatlands  

 

 

 

 

 

Wim Giesen  



Euroconsult Mott MacDonald 

13 March 2015 

 

 

 



 

 

Sustainable Peatlands for People & Climate (SPPC) Project 



Wetlands International 

Funded by Norad 



 

 



 

Cover  photo:    Melaleuca  cajuputi  has  showy  flowers  and  pale,  papery  bark  that  is  shed  (here  in  South 

Kalimantan, September 2007). 

 

Note: all photographs are by the author, except Photo 4  



 

Introduction 

Indonesian  paperbark,  ‘kayu  putih’  or  ‘gelam’  (Melaleuca  cajuputi)  as  it  is  known  in  Indonesia  is  a 

member of the eucalyptus family, and like the other members of the family it sheds its bark, produces 

showy  flowers  and  contains  fragrant  oils.  It  is  a  remarkably  resilient  small  tree,  as  it  can  withstand 

frequent  flooding  and  acidic  soils,  but  also  mildly  brackish  conditions  and  it  also  survives  mild  fires 

reasonably well. It is therefore often found in disturbed areas behind mangroves, where swamp forests 

have been cleared and burnt, and there one may find large stands of same aged gelam trees. While it 

prefers clayey soils,  it may also occur on peat and even  deep peat. Its  wood is very strong, durable 

and resistant to rot; at the same time it is very heavy and does not float. It is therefore often seen on 

construction  sites  where  it  is  used  for  scaffolding,  but  also  as  piles  driven  into  the  soil  upon  which 

houses or other constructions (even roads!) may be built. It is very versatile and has many other uses 

as  well.  Its  wood  is  used  for  making  charcoal,  and  used  by  the  pulp-and-paper  and  active  carbon 

industries. Its leaves contain etheric oils that may be distilled and used for medicinal purposes, and in 

ointments and liniments. The showy flowers produce honey and support beekeeping, while the bark is 

traditionally  used  for  caulking  boats.  In  a  wider  landscape,  gelam  may  be  cultivated  together  with 

sedges (purun, Lepironia articulata) used for weaving  mats, hats and so on, while fish may be kept in 

pools,  ditches,  ponds  and  segments  of  canals  common  in  the  disturbed  habitats  favoured  by  this 

species. 

In this case study information is collated about the ecology and propagation of the species, while the 

confusing taxonomy is detailed in an annex. Also included are sections on its various uses, production 

systems,  productivity  and  markets.  Opportunities  for  cultivating  gelam  for  economic  benefit  in 

disturbed  but  rehabilitated  peatland  areas  (aka  ‘paludiculture’  or  swamp  cultivation)  are  addressed, 

and the main section concludes with an overview of knowledge gaps and research needs. Lastly, the 

case study includes a list of references for additional reading, followed by the annex on taxonomy and 

a lengthy description of the species.  

 

 

Photo 1:  Natural stand of Melaleuca cajuputi with mangrove ferns (Acrostichum) at 



the mouth of the Kahayan River, Central Kalimantan (26

th

 Jan. 2008)  



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

1.    Uses of Gelam  

 

 

Wood



  

Gelam  poles  are  used  for  construction,  as  they  last  well  in  moist  conditions  and  are  not  readily 

attacked by termites. They are widely used in Indonesia for construction purposes (scaffolding, piles) 

and for lining watercourses, while thicker trunks are used for sawn timber, high quality fuel wood and 

charcoal (Photo 2). The sawn timber is used for construction, building posts and piles, fencing posts, 

carpentry, and shipbuilding. It is durable under wet conditions, but requires treatment when used in dry 

outdoor conditions. The wood is hard and fine to medium textured; it is difficult to plane, but saws well, 

but the high silica content dulls saws. The timber is moderately hard to hard, heavy (sinker), and the 

sapwood is light pink-brown.  

 

Gelam  wood  chips  from  Vietnam  are  sold  for  producing  paper,  pulp,  medium-density  fibreboard 



(MDF), cement board and particle board. A study in Vietnam (Nguyen, 2008) compared locally grown 

gelam with strains of Eucalyptus and Acacia and found its properties (cellulose & lignin content, fibre 

length)  to  be  very  comparable  to  Acacia.  The  species  is  specifically  cultivated  for  pulp  production  in 

Vietnam.  

 

 

Photo  2:  Melaleuca  cajuputi  poles  being  transported  by  boat  and  truck  to 



Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, and from there to Surabaya (25

th

 Sept. 2007)  



 

Oil

   


Like other members of the Myrtaceae (myrtle) family (e.g. Eucalyptus, cloves/Syzygium aromaticum), 

gelam contains aromatic, etheric oils. The main etheric oil product from gelam is cajuput (or cineole) 

oil,  a  valuable  Eucalyptus-like  oil  that  is  extracted  from  gelam  leaves  in  restricted  parts  of  Indonesia 

(e.g. Sulawesi, Tanimbar, Buru, Java) and Southeast Asia where the subspecies (Melaleuca cajuputi 

ssp. cajuputi) containing higher concentrations of the oil occurs (Craven, 1999). M. cajuputi has been 

planted in Central Java since 1926 for oil production, using seeds from Buru, and it is also planted in 

Malaysia  (Doran,  1999).  The  cineole  content  of  gelam  varies  per  subspecies  (see  annex  1)  and 

location (Doran, 1999). Measurements for Melaleuca cajuputi subspecies cajuputi shows that cineoles 

comprise 43.7% of the essential oils found, while for M. cajuputi subspecies platyphylla this was found 

to be 41.0% (Silva et al., 2007).  



 

Cajuput  oil  is  used  in  various  ointments,  balms  (e.g.  tiger  balm),  shampoos,  medicines,  insect 



repellents  and  aromatherapy  (Photo  3).  Leaves  are  crushed  and  heated  (distilled),  releasing  the  oil 

which  is  then  collected  and  bottled.  In  Vietnam,  the  oil  content  was  found  to  be  low  and  of  a  poor 

quality (compared to Australian Melaleuca oil), with an annual yield of “more than US$ 40 per hectare” 

(Maltby et al., 1996), and hence the introduction of the Australian species Melaleuca alternifolia for this 

purpose (Huynh et al. 2011). In Thailand, though, the species is widely used for this purpose (Nuyim, 

2001).  Safford  (pers.  comm.  1996)  reports  that  by  proper  management,  cineol-rich  forms  can  be 

produced.   

The oil is used as a medicine for many ailments. It is used internally for the treatment of coughs and 

colds, and  against stomach cramps, colic and asthma. It is used externally for the relief of neuralgia 

and  rheumatism,  and  for  the  relief  of  toothache  and  earache.  The  oil  repels  insects,  used  as  a 

sedative  and  relaxant,  and  is  useful  in  treating  worms.  Lastly,  it  is  used  as  a  fragrance  in  soaps, 

cosmetics, detergents and perfumes, and in flavouring cooking (Doran, 1999).  

 

Photo  3:    Kayu  putih  Melaleuca  cajuputi  oil  and  balms  containing  this  oil  are 



commonly used throughout Indonesia 

 

Honey

  

Melaleuca  flowers  produce  good  quality  honey  and  are  favoured  by  honeybees  (Photo  4).  Honey  – 

mainly  from  the  migratory  Asian  Giant  Bee,  Apis  dorsata  –  is  harvested  from  wild  beehives  in  the 

swamp forest. In general, the harvesting of honey is currently of a very small-scale, and almost entirely 

for  subsistence  purposes  only.  There  is  obvious  scope  for  honey  production  in  Indonesia,  as  the 

country is a net importer of this product. The market is potentially great, as honey is perceived to be of 

medicinal  value  (obat).  Gelam  flowers  profusely  all-year  round  and  produces  copious  amounts  of 

nectar, making it an ideal host species for bees. Bee-keeping is proposed by the project to be carried 

out  on  a  modest  scale,  in  conjunction  with  the  gelam  plantation.  Maltby  et  al.  (1996)  report  that  5-6 

litres of honey can be harvested per hectare per year.  

Mulder (1993) reports on honey production from the Mekong Delta, and found that both professional 

beekeepers and honey hunters operated in the area. The Song Trem State Forest, with about 2500 ha 

of  replanted  Melaleuca,  produced  about  13-15  tons  of  honey  annually,  but  Mulder  (1993)  points  out 



 

that the resource is under-utilised. The best forests are 4-6 year old stands which are still quite open, 



with  ‘rafters’  being  placed  to  attract  bees;  Mulder  found  a  rafter  occupancy  of  50-60%  in  the  dry 

season  and  60-90%  in  the  rainy  season.  Honey  is  collected  during  two  major  seasons,  each  nest 

being cropped 3-4 times per season. The first harvest is usually done three weeks after the observed 

first arrival of the colony, followed by the next harvest after a two week interval. The yield per harvest 

is about 4 kg of honey. Mainly the upper part of the comb is cut, leaving brood comb in the nest. Later 

in  the  season  more  brood  comb  is  cut  away  because  this  would  eat  away  the  honey  during  the 

remaining season. Brood is protein rich, and is eaten fresh or baked (Mulder, 1993).  

 

 



Photo 4:   Gelam flowers are favoured by honeybees and produce excellent honey

1

 



 

Other uses 

Melaleuca  fruits  are  used  as  a  substitute  for  black  pepper  (Brinkman  &  Vo  Ting  Xuan  1988).  In 

Thailand, young shoots of Melaleuca cajuputi are considered edible, while an edible mushroom called 

“Samet”  is  also  harvested  from  the  Thai  Melaleuca  forest  Nuyim,  2001).  Fishing  and  harvesting  of 

edible  ferns  (young  fronds  of  Stenochlaena  palustris)  is  common  in  seasonally  flooded  gelam  areas 

and trees are often intercropped with sedges (e.g. Lepironia articulata) to provide material for weaving 

(Giesen,  1990;  Maltby  et  al.,  1996).  In  the  Mekong  Delta,  farmers  tending  stands  of  gelam  also 

cultivated frogs for the regional market. The papery bark is used for caulking boats, packing material, 

filling  mattresses  and  pillows,  as  insulation  material,  and  for  roofing  of  temporary  shelters  (Doran, 

1999). In the estuarine environment, the species provides a habitat for birds, fish and shrimps.  

 

 



                                                            

1

 



http://theoddsock-ericnp.blogspot.nl/2014/05/walk-report-mega-extravaganza.html

  


 

2.    Economics of Gelam  

 

 

In  the  following,  value  figures  have  been  quoted  from  various  authors  and  dates.  These  need  to  be 



reconciled  and  corrected  for  inflation  in  order  to  compare  them  and  attempt  an overall  calculation  of 

potential productive value per hectare per year.  

 

Vietnam  

Duc  and  Hufschmidt  (1993)  and  Maltby  et  al.  (1996)  report  that  for  the  Mekong  Delta  of  Vietnam, 

10,000  trees  can  be  harvested  per  hectare  on  a  9-year  cycle  that  includes  6  growth  years.  The 

maximum size of these poles is 20 centimetres. The model developed in the Mekong Delta was based 

on: 

• 

A 9 year cycle: with years 1-2 = preparation & planting, 3-8 = growth, 9 = harvest 



• 

Initial investments: bund & drainage system construction, land preparation, nursery & planting, 

bee-hive installation 

• 

Recurrent investments: fertilizer,  labour 



• 

Benefits: honey (yrs 4-8), thin poles (yrs 4-6), large poles (yr 9) 

• 

Total investment Dg 6.5 million (about USD 600); while total returns are Dg 35 million (about 



USD 3,200) per hectare.  

This represents a net return of USD 290/ha.yr.  



 

Kalimantan 

Potential calculated for South Kalimantan (Giesen, 1996) for one hectare, based on a 9-year cycle and 

only on pole production:  

• 

5,000  small  poles  (thinning  cycle,  yrs  4-6)  @  Rp700  each  =  Rp.  3.5  million  (at  the  time  of 



calculation, i.e. 1996, this was about USD 1,500) 

• 

10,000  large  poles  @  Rp2,500  each  =  Rp  25  million  (for  9-year  cycle;  at  the  time  of 



calculation, i.e. 1996, about USD 11,000) 

This leads to a return of about USD 1390/ha.yr.  



 

 

Sumatra   

On a study by ICRAF in Mesuji and Sugihan areas, South Sumatra, Suyanto et al. (2002) found that 

the farm gate price for timber was Rp. 150,000/m³ (about 13 USD), while for sawn timber this was Rp. 

500-600,000/m³ (about USD 44-52; unfortunately, these values are, however, not linked to unit labour 

or area).                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

 

Java 

In Central Java, 9,000 ha of plantation were found to produce about 31 kg of cinerol oil per hectare per 

year  (Doran,  1999),  which  at  a  market  price  of  about  USD  9.4/kg  leads  to  an  average  of  USD 

292/ha.yr for the oil alone.   

 

Options for home industries, & small- versus large-scale production 

Beekeeping  offers  several  options  for  home  industries,  based  on  commodities  such  as  honey, 

beeswax,  pollen  and  royal  jelly.  Increasing  the  quality  (e.g.  by  reducing  water  content  of  honey), 

packaging  and  labelling,  and  linking  with  upscale  markets  (e.g.  at  provincial  or  national  rather  than 

local level) can further enhance incomes. 

 


 

Weaving based on Lepironia articulata forms a basis for home industries in South Sumatra (e.g. Ogan-



Komering) and South Kalimantan (e.g. Negara), and products include mats, hats and an assortment of 

basketry.  Again,  linking  with  upscale  markets  can  further  enhance  incomes,  especially  if  combined 

with other local initiatives (e.g. small woven baskets for packaging jars of locally produced honey).  

 

Charcoal  making  can  also  be  conducted  on  a  small-scale  basis,  and  offers  opportunities  for  home 



industries, especially where the demand is high (e.g. near provincial capitals, or in close proximity to 

Jakarta, Singapore or Kuala Lumpur).  

 

Cajuput  or  cineol  oil  is  extracted  from  Melaleuca  cajuputi  leaves  by  means  of  staged  distillation,  i.e. 



several rounds of distillation, and in most cases this is conducted on a moderately large to large scale 

basis  (e.g.  small  factories;  see  Huynh  et  al  2011).  Such  production  could  be  considered  at  a  village 

level, but not at household level. The latter also poses a health risk, as cineol oil is (mildly) toxic and 

inappropriate for distilling in a domestic setting.  



 

Most  products  from  Melaleuca  can  ideally  be  done  on  a  small-scale,  as  much  is  labour  intensive 

(thinning  of  stands,  collection  of  honey,  reeds  and  mushrooms,  etc...).  Only  pole,  pulp  and  timber 

production  could  be  done  at  an  industrial  scale,  although  this  could  also  be  carried  out  by  farmers 

providing raw materials for a larger company.  

 

Markets 

Fuel  wood  and  pole  markets  are  generally  local,  although  poles  from  South  and  Central  Kalimantan 

are also marketed to Java, via Banjarmasin and Surabaya.  

 

Cajuput  oil  is  marketed  world-wide  via  national  companies  that  produce  ointments,  balms  (e.g.  tiger 



balm), medicines and aromatherapy. In Indonesia, most of these companies are based in Java (esp. 

Jakarta, Surabaya).  

 

The market for honey is generally local, although some is marketed regionally, for example, from the 



local producers to the district and provincial capitals. 

 

3.   Gelam as a paludiculture species 



 

Degradation and conversion of peat swamp forests of Sumatra and Kalimantan has led to enhanced 

carbon emissions and contributed to Indonesia being a major emitter of greenhouse gases. Drainage 

of  peatland  not  only  increases  oxidation  and  fire  risk,  but  leads  to  soil  subsidence  and  undrainable 

conditions. 7 Mha of peatland on Sumatra and Kalimantan are licensed for plantation crops such as oil 

palm  and  Acacia  crassicarpa  that  require  drainage  and  contribute  to  carbon  emissions  and 

subsidence.  It  is  suggested  that  planting  useful  peat  swamp  forest  species  that  do  not  require 

drainage in a ‘paludiculture’ (swamp cultivation) programme could provide an economically attractive 

and sustainable alternative. Gelam is a species that could be considered in paludiculture programmes.   

 

Apart  from  9,000  ha  of  plantation  in  Central  Java,  Melaleuca  cajuputi  is  known  in  Indonesia  from 

natural stands only, especially in disturbed near coastal habitats, including shallow to moderately deep 

peat (Giesen, 1990). In the U Minh forest in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, it has been widely cultivated 

on deep peat, as part of a restoration programme following widespread deforestation and fires (Maltby 

et  al.,  1996).  Peat  hydrology  is  not  elaborated  in  the  accounts  and  papers  available  on  these 

Vietnamese programmes, but it can be assumed that the hydrology was not intact when paludiculture 

attempts  were  initiated.  Also,  given  that  these  plantations  suffer  from  fires  it  may  be  assumed  that 

hydrological rehabilitation had not occurred prior to plantation establishment.  


 

The example from the Mekong Delta (see 2. Gelam economics) shows that multiple products (poles, 



cineol oil, honey) can be derived from Melaleuca paludiculture stands. This can be further expanded 

(see Duc & Hufschmidt, 1993) to include seasonal fisheries (during season when peatland is flooded) 

and  reeds  (e.g.  Lepironia  articulata,  which  provides  excellent  weaving  material).  In  principle,  other 

trees or shrubs could be intercropped with rows of Melaleuca, as the species does not provide much 

shade and hence does not compete strongly for light. In Central Java (albeit on dryland), young stands 

of gelam are intercropped with cassava, maize and groundnuts during the first two years, with gelam 

planted at a density of 5,000 per hectare (Doran, 1999). However, leaves and bark shed by Melaleuca 

are allelopathic, i.e. they release compounds that are (mildly) toxic to other plant species and thereby 

suppress their growth and possible competition (for space, nutrients). This has not been studied in any 

detail  and  certainly  not  in  production  systems  (such  as  paludiculture),  and  this  would  need  to  be 

assessed  case-by-case  via  trials  with  potential  intercropping  species.  However,  it  does  not  visibly 

affect Lepironia.  

 

Once  production  systems  have  been  established  on  peat,  one  needs  to  consider  adopting  a  low 



impact  means  of  harvesting  gelam  poles.  Clear-felling  of  areas  is  to  be  avoided  as  this  will  lead  to 

desiccation of peat, and subsequent subsidence and a much increased fire risk. This can be mitigated 

to  some  degree  by  planting  mixed  age  stands  and  selectively  felling  older  specimens,  or  by  felling 

alternate rows or small blocks (<5x5m).    

 

 

4. Summary of issues and knowledge gaps.  

 

The species has a wide tolerance range, but there has not been much in the way of selection in order 



to improve the product. Ideally, the species would i) produce tall, straight boles and grow quickly (for 

timber), ii) produce leaves with high concentrations of cajuput oil, and iii) produce prodigious amounts 

of flowers all year round (for honey and seed production). However, all these aspects range widely in 

natural settings, and there seems lots of room for improving the stock.  

 

Cineole oil content of leaves can readily be determined using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy on air 



dried leaf samples (Schimleck et al., 2003). This could be used as a rapid technique for selecting trees 

for oil content and use in breeding programmes.   

 

For  paludiculture,  the  cultivation  of  Melaleuca  on  (deep)  peat  needs  to  be  better  understood.  Trials 



need  to  be  carried  out  on  degraded  peatland  (with  rehabilitated  hydrology)  to  assess  growth  and 

production rates (of timber, poles, oil) on deep peat.  

 

While  in  Central  Java  gelam  has  been  successfully  cultivated  in  dryland  plantations  since  1926, 



elsewhere  in  Indonesia  there  seems  to  be  little  or  no  success.  One  of  the  few  attempts known  from 

outside Java (mineral soil swamp in South Kalimantan, MoF in 2004) experienced 100% failure within 

a  few  years  (pers.  observation  in  2007;  see  Photo  5).  Hence,  there  is  dependence  in  Indonesia  on 

naturally regenerating stands.  

 

Little  is  known  about  the  social  aspects  of  Melaleuca  cultivation  and/or  harvesting,  especially  in 



Indonesia,  and  information  on  usufruct  rights,  access  and  tenure  have  generally  not  been  studied. 

Tenure  seems  the  greatest  obstacle  at  present,  as  most  Melaleuca  is  harvested  in  the  wild  from 

degraded areas under MoF jurisdiction. Community forestry areas would seem a good alternative, but 

such stands do not exist at present. Opportunities for this need to be studied.  

 

Market  studies  are  required,  to  understand  where  the  major  demands  are  (for  oil,  pulp,  wood),  and 



how this could best be cultivated in order to upscale production.  

 

 



Photo  5:    25  ha  area  in  South  Kalimantan  planted  by  the  Forestry  &  Plantation 

Service with three tree species, including gelam in 2004 (visited Sept 2007).  



 

 

 

 

References: 



 

Blake,  S.T.  (1968)  -  A  revision  of  Melaleuca  leucadendron  and  its  allies  (Myrtaceae).  Contr.  Qld. 

Herbarium, Queensl., No. 1:1-114. 



Brinkman, W.J. and Vo Tong Xuan (1988) - Melaleuca leucadendron, a useful and versatile tree for 

acid sulphate soils and other poor environments. Unpublished report, presented at the Symposium on 

Acid Sulphate Soils, Dakar, 1985. 

Craven, L.A. and B.A. Barlow (1997) – New Taxa and New Combinations in Melaleuca (Myrtaceae). 

Novon 7:113-119.  



Craven, L.A. (1999) – Behind the names: the botany of tea tree, cajuput and niaouli. In: I. Southwell 

and R. Lowe (eds) – Tea Tree. The genus Melaleuca. Harwell Academic Publications, p.11-28.  



Doran,  J.C.  (1999)  –  Melaleuca  cajuputi  Powell.  In:  L.P.A.  Oyen  and  Nguyen  Xuan  Dung  (Editors), 

1999. Plant Resources of South-East  Asia  No. 19.  Essential Oil  plants.  Bakhuys Publishers, Leiden, 

the Netherlands (277 pp.), p:126-131. 

Duc,  L.D.  and  M.M.  Hufschmidt,  (1993)  -  Wetland  management  in  Vietnam.  Paper  presented  at  a 

workshop in Hawaii, 1993, 44pp.  



Giesen, W. (1990) - Vegetation of the Negara river basin. In: M. Zieren, T. Permana and W. Giesen 

(Editors), Conservation of the Sungai Negara Wetlands, Barito Basin, South Kalimantan. PHPA/AWB-

Indonesia, in cooperation with KPSL Unlam, Bogor, January 1990, p:1-51. 

Giesen, W.  (1996)  -  Melaleuca  cropping  in  swamps  of  southern  Kalimantan.  Note  produced  for  the 

Salim Group, 10 November 1996.  



Giesen, W., S. Wulffraat, M. Zieren & L. Scholten (2007) – Mangrove Guidebook for Southeast Asia. 

FAO  & Wetlands  International.  RAP  Publications  2006/07,  Bangkok,  Thailand,  ISBN  974-7946-85-8. 

769 pp.. 

Giesen, W. (2008) – Biodiversity and the EMRP. Master Plan for the Conservation and Development 

of  the  Ex-Mega  Rice  Project  Area  in  Central  Kalimantan.  Euroconsult  Mott  MacDonald,  Delft 

Hydraulics and associates, for Government of Indonesia & Royal Netherlands Embassy, Jakarta. Final 

draft, 77 pp.  



Huynh,  Q.,  T.D.  Phan,  V.Q.Q.Thieu,  S.T.  Tran  and  S.H.  Do  (2011)  –  Extraction  and  refining  of 

essential oil from Australian tea tree,  Melaleuca alterfornia, and the  antimicrobial activity  in cosmetic 

products.  Asia-Pacific  Interdisciplinary  Research  Conference2011  (AP-IRC2011),  Journal  of  Physics 

Conference Series 352 (2012), 7 pp.  



Kogawara,  S.,  T.  Yamanoshita,  M.  Norisada,  M.  Masumori  and  K.  Kojima  (2006)  –  Photosynthesis 

and photoassimilate transport during root hypoxia in Melaleuca cajuputi, a flood-tolerant species, and 

in Eucalyptus camaldulensis, a moderately flood-tolerant species. Tree Physiology, Volume 26, Issue 

11: 1413-1423. 



Maltby,  E.,  P.  Burbridge  and  A.  Fraser,  (1996)  -  Peat  and  acid  sulphate  soils:  a  case  study  from 

Vietnam. In: E. Maltby, C.P. Immirzi and R.J. Safford (Eds.), Tropical Lowland Peatlands of Southeast 

Asia, p: 187-197. IUCN - The World Conservation Union, Gland, Switzerland. 

Mulder, V. (1993) – Honey  and wax production  in submerged Melaleuca forests in Vietnam. LIDSE, 

Hanoi, Vietnam, 12 pp.  



Nguyen,  Q.  T.  (2008)  –  Melaleuca  timber.  Resource  Potential  and  its  Current  Use  in  Kien  Giang 

Province.  GTZ  Kien  Giang  Biosphere  Reserve  Project.  Technical  report  04E1208TRUNG.  GTZ  & 

AusAID, 27 pp. 

Nuyim,  T.  (2001)  –  Potentiality  of  Melaleuca  cajuputi  Powell  Cultivation  to  Develop  for  Economic 

Plantation  Purpose.  Forest  Management  and  Forest  Products  Research  Office.  Royal  Forest 

Department, Chatrujac, Bangkok. 10900. Thailand. 


10 

 

Paijmans,  K.  (1976)  -  New  Guinea  Vegetation.  Elsevier  Scientific  Publications.  Amsterdam,  Oxford, 

New York.  

Samati, C. (undated) – Net primary production of  Melaleuca  leucadendra stands in swamp forest of 

Narathiwas Province. Pattani Regional Forest Office, Pattani, Thailand, 10 pp.  



Schimleck,  L.R.,  J.C.  Doran  and  A.  Rimbawanto  (2003)  –  Near  Infrared  Spectroscopy  for  Cost 

Effective Screening of Foliar Oil Characteristics in a Melaleuca cajuputi Breeding Population. J. Agric. 

Food Chem., 2003, 51 (9), pp 2433–2437. 

Silva,  C.J.,  L.C.A.  Barbosa1,C.R.A.  Maltha,  A.L.  Pinheiro  and  F.M.D.  Ismail  (2007)  -  Comparative 

study  of  the  essential  oils  of  seven  Melaleuca  (Myrtaceae)  species  grown  in  Brazil.  Flavour  and 

Fragrance Journal. 22(6):474–478.  

Suyanto  S,,  R.P.  Permana  and  N.  Khususiyah  (2002)  –  Fire,  livelihood  and  swamp  management: 

evidence from Southern Sumatra. Bogor, Indonesia. International Centre for Research in Agroforestry, 

SEA Regional Research Programme. RP0112-05, 48 pp  

Tomita,  M.,  Y.  Hirabuki,  K.  Suzuki,  K.  Hara,  N.  Kaita  and  Y.  Araki  (2000)  –  Drastic  recovery  of 

Melaleuca-dominant  scrub  after  a  severe  wildfire:  a  three-year  period  study  in  a  degraded  peat 

swamp, Thailand. Eco-habitat: JISE Research, vol. 7(1): 81-87.  



van Steenis C.G.G.J. (1938) - Het gelam bosje bij Muara Angke. De Tropische Natuur, Vol. XXVII.  

van Steenis, C.G.G.J. (1954) - Vegetatie en flora. In: W.C. Klein (Ed.), Nieuw Guinea. Staatsdrukkerij 

en Uitgeverijbedrijf, The Hague, 470 pp. p:218-275.  

 


11 

 

Annex 1. Taxonomy & description of Melaleuca cajuputi Roxb. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

(a)  Branchlet  with  flower  and 

fruit  clusters,  (b)  flower,  and 

(c)  fruit;  adapted  from  Giesen 

et al (2007) 

 

 



a.  Taxonomy  &  distribution:  Gelam  is  the  common  Indonesian  name  for  trees  of  the  genus 

Melaleuca,  which  in  English  are  called  “paperbark”  because  of  their  thin,  papery  white  bark.  The 

taxonomic status of gelam in Indonesia is often confused and at least two species are known to occur. 

The species occurring in western Indonesia is Melaleuca cajuputi, which extends from mainland Asia 

to  northern  Australia,  while  a  second  species,  Melaleuca  leucadendra,  is  confined  to  eastern 

Indonesia  (Papua,  Moluccas,  Nusa  Tenggara  Timor)  and  northern  Australia  (Blake,  1968;  Craven, 

1999). At least three subspecies are known of Melaleuca cajuputi: ssp. cajuputi, ssp. cumingiana and 

ssp.  platyphylla  (Craven  &  Barlow,  1997),  of  which  ssp.  cajuputi  occurs  in  Moluccas  and  Australia 

(Western  Australia  and  Northern  Territory),  ssp.  cumingiana,  occurs  in  Burma,  Vietnam,  Thailand, 

Sumatra, southwestern Kalimantan, western Java; and ssp. platyphylla occurs in Papua, Papua New 

Guinea  and  Australia  (Queensland).  In  the  Indonesian  and  Southeast  Asian  literature  the  species  in 

Western  Indonesia  is  often  incorrectly  described  as  Melaleuca  leucodendron  or  M.  leucadendra.  In 

summary,  Melaleuca  cajuputi  occurs  from  Burma  eastwards  to  Thailand,  Cambodia,  Vietnam, 

Southern  China,  Malaysia,  Singapore,  Brunei,  Indonesia  (Sumatra,  Borneo,  Java,  Lesser  Sundas, 

Moluccas), The Philippines, East Timor, Papua New Guinea and northern Australia. 

 

b. SynonymsMelaleuca commutata Miq., Melaleuca lancifolia Turcz., Melaleuca leucadendron L.  

 

c.  Vernacular  name(s):  English:  paperbark  tree,  white-wood,  Melaleuca;  Indonesian:  gelam,  kayu 

putih, inggolom, baru galang, waru galang iren, bus, irono ngelak, sakelan, ai kelane, ai elane 

 

d.  Description:  Large  shrub  to  tall  evergreen  tree,  up  to  24(-30)  m  tall  but  usually  5-15  m,  with  a 

narrow, dense, greyish-green bushy crown and a stout, often twisted trunk. Bark whitish to light grey or 

greyish-brown, often  tinged with orange-brown, fissured and  papery flaky in coarse elongate shaggy 

pieces. Young twigs covered with silky hairs. Leaves spirally arranged, leaf stalk 6-12.5 mm long, leaf 

blade 5-12.5 by 1.25-3.75 cm, greyish-green, lanceolate, often slightly curved, base tapered, with 5-7 

longitudinal  nerves,  young  leaves  silky  hairy.  Flowers  white,  without  a  stalk,  arranged  in  groups  of 

three along a terminal spike, 7.5-15 cm long, fluffy because of the many stamens, fragrant; petals 5, 

stamens  numerous.  Fruit  a  small,  3  mm  wide  woody  capsule,  without  a  stalk,  cushion-shaped, 


12 

 

greyish-brown, with a narrow groove round the top surrounding a small crater-like cup marked with 5 



radial  grooves,  long  persistent  on  the  twigs.  Seeds:  many  and  tiny.  The  terminal  ‘spike’  is  really  the 

leafless part of an axillary shoot, and after flowering the end bud continues growth to produce a flush 

of leaves before dropping. Leaves have a high content of highly aromatic cajuput oil (minyak angin in 

Malaysia and Indonesia). It is locally common to very common.  

 

e. EcologyMelaleuca cajuputi occurs naturally in coastal freshwater swamps, both on mineral soils 

and  moderately  deep  to  deep  peat,  and  at  the  landward  end  of  mangroves.  Natural  stands  of 



Melaleuca  cajuputi  appear  to  be  located  in  the  transition  zone  between  mangroves  and  freshwater 

swamps/peat  swamp  forests  (van  Steenis  1938;  see  photo  6).  The  species  is  also  planted  along 

roadsides.  In  can  grow  in  perennially  wet  areas,  but  also  in  dryland  areas  with  a  pronounced  dry 

season.  It  is  fairly  wind  resistant  but  can  snap  in  severe  gales.  Pollination  is  by  insects.  Melaleuca 

occurs on heavy, deeply flooded acid sulphate soils (e.g. in Mekong Delta in Vietnam; Ogan-Komering 

floodplain in South Sumatra, and Negara River floodplain in South Borneo), coppices readily, and can 

withstand  repeated  fires.  In  swamps  that  have  been  disturbed,  for  instance  by  clearing  and  fires,  it 

tends to dominate the secondary regrowth, sometimes forming large, dense stands of almost uniform 

sized  trees.  The  secret  of  its  success  seems  to  be  its  tolerance  of  fires,  flooding  and  acid  soils.  Its 

papery bark offers insulation against heat, and its growth appears to be promoted by burning, mainly 

because most other woody species are thereby eliminated (Van Steenis 1954, Paijmans 1976, Giesen 

1990). Throughout much of its range, gelam appears to coincide with the occurrence of potential acid 

sulphate soils, and it has been considered that it might be a useful indicator species (Brinkman & Vo 

Tong Xuan 1988). It can withstand acid waters and can be found in the pH range of 3-7. Gelam can 

maintain growth under hypoxic (flooded) conditions due to adaptations of its metabolism (Kogawara et 

al., 2006), and hence is able to outcompete other species in such environments.  

 

It is a pioneer species, is light tolerant, and can quickly colonise areas, for example, areas that have 



been  burnt.  Unlike  in  Vietnam,  where  it  also  occurs  on  deep  peat  (e.g.  U  Minh  forest;  Maltby  et  al., 

1996),  gelam  generally  does  not  occur  on  peat  soils  in  Central  Kalimantan,  although  it  has  been 

recorded on shallow to moderately deep peat (1-2 m) in South Kalimantan (Giesen, 1990). There are 

few known pests, but it may be attacked by the fungus Cylindrocladium macrosporum and C. pteridis 

(Brinkman & Vo Tong Xuan 1988). The tree produces little shade and has little undergrowth.  

 

 



 

Photo 6. Natural stand of Melaleuca cajuputi adjacent Nypa fruticans near the mouth 

of the Kahayan River in Central Kalimantan; in foreground with the fern Acrostichum 

aureum and Eleocharis sedges (24

th

 Jan. 2008). 



13 

 

Annex 2  Cultivation, propagation & production of gelam 



 

a. Seedling establishment  

The  species  often  regenerates  naturally  after  fires,  as  the  fruits  open  after  fire,  spreading  the 

numerous, tiny, wind borne seeds. The seeds may also germinate underwater, provided that oxygen 

levels  are  at  least  4  mg/l,  but  under  flooded  conditions  seedlings  are  slow  to  anchor  their  roots. 

Cuttings of immature wood or slender roots form new plants readily, provided they are kept wet. Fruit-

bearing twigs are dried for two days under shelter/off the ground, after which the fruits have opened 

and  the  seeds  can  be  collected  along  with  the  chaff  –  these  should  not  be  separated,  as  the  chaff 

facilitates germination; seeds are tiny, with 1000 seeds weighing 30 mg. Seeds should be soaked in 

cold  water  for  24  hours  then  sown  in  a  seedbed  without  shade;  70%  germination  is  normal.  Once 

established, seedlings  will  tolerate flooding of up to six months, but  will stop growing. Under flooded 

conditions  they  will  grow  for  about  50  days,  provided  that  they  are  not  completely  submerged.  In 

Vietnam, the ‘bog’ technique of watering has been adopted to avoid tiny seedlings being damaged by 

overhead  watering  (Doran,  1999).  In  this  technique,  trays  with  medium  and  seedlings  are  kept 

permanently  in  water  but  not  submerged  or  flooded.  After  about  4  weeks  the  seedlings  are  sturdy 

enough to withstand overhead watering.  

 

b. Planting & tending 

On Java, seedlings are planted at an initial density of 5,000 per hectare, and during the first two years 

they  may  be  intercropped  with  cassava,  maize  or  groundnuts  (Doran,  1999).  Weeds  need  to  be 

removed manually, as these may smother the plants, but also add to increased fire hazard.   

 

c. Growth & flooding  



Melaleuca  cajuputi  grows  taller  on  a  water-saturated  soil  than  on  a  moist,  well-drained  soil.  In  water 

saturated  soils  the  trees  are  taller  and  straighter,  which  is  more  desirable  for  timber,  though  for 

leaves/oil production a dryland situation produces better results (Brinkman & Vo Ting Xuan 1988).   

 

 

Photo  7.    A  uniform  post-fire  stand  of  Melaleuca  cajuputi  being  drained  (and 

ultimately cleared) for development in South Kalimantan (25

th

 Sept. 2007)  



 

14 

 

d. Growth & fires 

In Thailand, Melaleuca cajuputi is one of the few species to recolonise burnt peatland, as described by 

Tomita et al (2000). In Narathiwat, a fire removed the top 25 cm in a shallow peatland (90cm depth) 

along  with  all  plants  species  including  underground  parts.  Recolonisation  was  by  Melaleuca,  ferns 

such as Blechnum indicum, a host of sedges such as Lepironia articulata, Scleria sumatrana, Cyperus 



procerus  and  Fimbristylis  natans,  and  the  shrub  Melastoma  malabathricum.  Dense  Melaleuca 

seedlings  appeared  7±6.3/m²  three  months  after  the  fires,  from  wind  dispersed  seeds.  After  three 

years height had increased to 29-187 cm and a cohort of Melaleuca had overcome other species by 

1.5  years  on  average.  Elsewhere  as  well,  post  fire  regeneration  results  in  large,  uniform  cohorts  of 



Melaleuca (Photos 7 & 8).  

 

 



Photo  8.  Gelam  in Wasur  NP  in  Papua:  seemingly  unaffected  by  flooding  and  fires 

(note the blackened trunks; 1996)  

 

 

e. Production   

 

e.1 Natural  stands in  Australia: Stands  in Northern Territory, Australia,  have  293 trees/ha,  with an 

average dbh ranging from 13-62 cm (median 30-35 cm) and an aboveground fresh weight of 1009 kg  

(±51  kg)  per  tree  and  263  tons/ha  (±  0.3  tons/ha).  On  ground  litter  was  582-2176  g/m² (dry  weight), 

while litter fall had a maximum of 108 g/m² (dry weight; Finlayson et al, 1993).  

 

e.2 Natural stands in Thailand: Samati (undated) found  in swamp forests of Narathiwas, Thailand, 

extending  over  15,200  ha,  that  aboveground  biomass  was  32.1  tons/ha,  segregated  into  stems  (24 

tons/ha),  branches  (5.5  tons/ha)  and  leaves  (2.6  tons/ha).  Net  primary  productivity  was  found  to  be 

9.27 tons/ha.yr, of which stems 3.12 tons/ha.yr, branches 1.53 tons/ha.yr and leaves 4.62 tons/ha.yr.  

 

e.3  Natural  stands  in  Kalimantan:  In  Central  and  South  Kalimantan,  gelam  is  harvested  from  wild 

stands  and  is  not  cultivated  in  any  way.  Documentation  about  the  gelam  industry  in  Kalimantan  is 

scant, and economic analyses on gelam systems do not appear to have been carried out in Indonesia. 

As  a  result,  gelam  forests  are  generally  regarded  as  unproductive  wasteland  and  are  targeted  for 

conversion (e.g. for transmigration agriculture or oil  palm). According  to Forestry  Department figures 

(Giesen, 2009), just over 70,000 ha of gelam forest occurs in the EMRP area of Central Kalimantan. 

The main gelam products in Central Kalimantan are poles and fuel wood. Poles are often marketed to 



15 

 

Banjarmasin, and beyond to Java, while fuel wood appears to be mainly for the local market. Locally, 



there is some harvesting of fern fronds and sedges, and limited honey and charcoal production. These 

products  appear  on  local  village  markets  and  in  village  stalls.  Cajuput  oil  does  not  appear  to  be 

produced  in  the  province.  Most  of  the  gelam  (-related)  product  harvesting  and  trade  appears  to  be 

carried out by local entrepreneurs and not directly involve the Forestry Department. Attempts in 2004 

by the Ministry of Forest at planting Melaleuca cajuputi in degraded areas in South Kalimantan (Desa 

Babat  Raya,  Kec.  Wanaraya)  were  unsuccessful.  However,  these  trials  were  not  evaluated  by  MoF 

and the cause of failure remains unknown, although (from observation of the site in 2007) it is guessed 

that it may be related to lack of tending after planting, as there was no sign of recent fires.  

 

e.4 Natural stands in Eastern Indonesia: Natural stands in Eastern Indonesia on the islands of Buru, 

Seram, Ambon and adjacent islands extend over about 200,000 ha and figures suggest that annually 

about 90 tons of oil are produced annually (Doran, 1999).  

 

 



 

 

Photo  9.    Harvesting  gelam  poles  (sinkers!)  in  the  Ogan-Komering  lebaks,  South 



Sumatra (August 1990)  

 

 



e.5  Plantations  in  Vietnam:  Due  to  the  use  of  napalm,  agent  orange,  and  canal  and  road 

construction,  Melaleuca  in  the  Mekong  Delta  of  Vietnam  declined  from  40,000  ha  to  only  a  few 

thousand  hectares  by  1980.  In  the  1980s  and  1990s  various  Melaleuca  rehabilitation  projects  were 

implemented, usually incorporating three key elements: pole-, honey- and cineol oil production. It was 

expected  that  a  very  productive  system  could  thus  be  developed,  with  a  very  high  internal  rate  of 

return (IRR) of 56% (Duc & Hufschmidt, 1993). Melaleuca poles and leaves (for oil production) were 

harvested  manually,  and  transported  by  boat  (wet  season)  or  by  cart  and  truck  (dry  season). 

Harvesting  was  timed  to  coincide  with  a  period  during  which  labour  is  not  required  in  the  ricefields. 

Leaves  were  brought  for  processing  at  a  (mobile)  cineol  oil  production  plant,  while  poles  will  be 

transported to temporary holding area near one of the main jetties, from where they were shipped. As 

a result of these programmes, the area of Melaleuca increased again to about 16,000 ha by 1986, and 

in all a total of 50,000 ha of Melaleuca was re-established. 

  


16 

 

Many  of  these  sites  in  the  Mekong  delta  are  now  abandoned  or  operating  at  sub-optimal  capacity, 



apparently  due  to  a  combination  of  harsh  working  conditions  and  poorer  than  expected  results,  and 

fires had reduced the area to about 3,000 ha by the mid-1990s. Key issues: i) canals providing access 

led to peat drying out and high fire risk; ii) no thinning and little maintenance was carried out, so stock 

densities  were  too  high,  increasing  fire  risk,  but  also  infestations  with  swamp  ferns  Stenochlaena 



palustris (Photo 10); iii) poor farmers who were not involved set fire to the Melaleuca to make way for 

rice  cultivation;  iv)  local  farmers  perceive  that  even  low  returns  from  rice  on  peat  (<1  ton/ha.yr)  is 

greater benefit than long term benefit from Melaleuca (short-term needs must be met); and v) no fire 

management due to lack of budget.   



 

When  still  about  120,000  ha  of  gelam  occurred,  about  100  tons  of  oil  was  produced  annually  in  the 

Mekong Delta (Doran, 1999).  

 

 



Photo 11.  A stand of Melaleuca cajuputi in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam (March 1998) 

overgrown by the fern Stenochlaena palustris  

 

e.6 Plantations in Java:  Production from an estimated 9,000 ha  of government owned plantation in 

Central  Java  amounted  to  about  280  tons  in  1993  (Doran,  1999).  This  is  about  31  kg  of  oil  per 

hectares per year. 

 

 



  

 


Yüklə 5,54 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə