Advanced trauma life support



Yüklə 84,13 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix14.12.2016
ölçüsü84,13 Kb.

Advanced trauma life support

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ATLS: past, present, and future

P Driscoll, J Wardrope

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ATLS is at a crossroads in its development

T

he family tragedy in 1976 gave birth



to the trauma legend known as

ATLS. In that year a plane piloted

by the orthopaedic surgeon J Styner

crashed in Nebraska. His wife was killed

and four children seriously injured.

Unfortunately for Dr Styner he found

that the subsequent care received in the

local hospital was inferior to what he

was able to provide for 10 hours at the

scene of the accident. In the ensuing

inquiry the need to train clinicians in

trauma care became evident.

1

Using the educational structure of the



recently developed ACLS programme,

the first ATLS course was run in

Nebraska in 1978. The following year it

was taken up by the American College

of Surgeons Committee on Trauma

(ACS COT) and rapidly spread through-

out the North, Central, and South

America. Today ATLS is taught in over

42 countries and around half a million

clinicians have completed the course

(I Hughes, personal communication).

In the UK alone over 13 000 providers

and 3000 instructors have been trained

since its arrival in 1988 (S Dilgert,

personnel communication).

As Nolan says in his article, ATLS

originally represented a state of the art

training course on the care of major

trauma.

2

Its new and refreshing educa-



tional format made it accessible to all

clinicians dealing with trauma in the

resuscitation room. The reason for this

was that it incorporated clear clinical

principles that underpin the course.

These have not changed in 28 years:

N

Trauma is a surgical disease



N

Treat the greatest threat first

N

Lack of history should not prevent



assessment starting

N

Lack of a precise diagnosis should not



prevent treatment starting

N

The course teaches one safe system



These principles became translated

into


the

now


famous

structured

approach to trauma care. With even

medical students being familiar with

this system, it is easy to forget how

revolutionary these thoughts were in

1976. Older readers will empathise with

McKeown’s comments regarding the

state of trauma care in the UK in 1988

when ATLS first arrived.

3

Integral to the success of the ATLS



course was the educational principles on

which it was based. Out went the formal

lecture; in came the intimate, almost

personal tuition. The 2.5 day course is

intense but supportive allowing candi-

dates to learn from instructors in a

variety of ways.

4

The pace of the course



builds up, crescendo-like, to the point

when the candidates carry out their own

simulated resuscitation. All other life

support courses, and indeed significant

parts of undergraduate and postgradu-

ate training, have subsequently copied

these educational points.

The final element in the success of

ATLS is its quality control system. From

its inception it aimed to provide a

system of care that was safe, effective,

and able to be practised in all trauma

receiving hospitals. Through the offices

of the ACS COT the manual and course

was reviewed every four years. They also

only issued providers and instructors

with certification valid for the same

length of time—again to encourage

clinicians to remain up to date. With

strict use of copyright and control of

dissemination, the character of the

course has been maintained over 26

years, six editions, and transfer to 42

countries. ATLS remains an internation-

ally recognised standard of care and is

an icon for all other life support courses

and educational formats.

With such glowing praise it may seem

churlish to criticise it. There are however

some significant problems that require

serious consideration. From its origin it

is easy to understand the ACS COT view

of ‘‘Trauma being a surgical disease’’. As

a

consequence



ATLS

can


only

be

exported to a surgically approved centre



(such as the Royal College of Surgeons)

and a surgeon must direct all courses.

Unfortunately these rules do not reflect

reality. The TARN databases since 1990

show that 65.4% of the cases required

surgery of which 24.5% needed it within

eight hours (M Woodford, personnel

communication). Most of these cases

were orthopaedic procedures. As Nolan

states the trauma patients are managed

by a team of people representing a range

of specialties—most notably emergency

medicine, anaesthesia, and orthopae-

dics. This heterogeneity is reflected

in

the


course

participants—32.7%

come from anaesthesia, 24.6% from

emergency medicine, and 16.8% from

orthopaedics

(S

Dilgert,



personnel

communication). It is therefore inter-

esting to note that up to the latest

edition there were no emergency med-

icine or anaesthetists acknowledged as

contributors to the course manual.

Nolan and McKeown list further

inconsistencies between the course and

how trauma care is practised in the UK

and other countries. Important areas of

controversy, such as airway manage-

ment, may simply reflect US practice

and the lack of non-surgical input into

the course preparation. Davis also reviews

the educational principles underpinning

ATLS and how UK instructors have

interpreted these differently.

4

The inter-



active approach with a community of

practice ensured by the instructors being

there for the whole course are not typical

of US run ATLS courses.

As ATLS courses are not cheap to set

up, run, or attend, their cost effective-

ness has been questioned. Of all the life

support courses, ATLS has probably

been subjected to the most appraisals.

They are known to increase knowledge

and skills (at least temporarily), con-

fidence, and lead to a change in

practice.

1

In contrast it has never been



shown that the courses increase patient

survival or reduces disability. As ATLS

addresses only one aspect of a spectrum

of care this is not surprising.

All these issues would be tolerable if it

were not for the perceived rigidity in the

ATLS organisation. The time delay in

bringing about changes and the prob-

lems in trying to incorporate non-US

practice has led to discontent even

within ATLS supportive groups. The

latest edition being launched this month

in the UK three years late only increases

this disquiet. In view of these problems,

the desire for evidence based medicine,

and the financial restrictions on post-

graduate education, it is understandable

that people are asking would it be better

to run our own trauma course.

ATLS development is at an important

crossroad in the UK and, possibly, in the

world in general. There are three main

options. Firstly, no changes could be

made to the organisation. The current

problems could be put down to a

passing phase and the previous good

track record used to show that there is

no need to change a winning formula.

The risk with this option is that people

do not think the ‘‘formula is winning’’.

As a result the decline in enthusiasm for

the course would continue and limit

further spread in the UK and to other

countries.

2

EDITORIALS



www.emjonline.com

group.bmj.com

 on December 14, 2016 - Published by 

http://emj.bmj.com/

Downloaded from 


The next option is to develop a

completely new course with an entirely

UK (or European) group of instructors

and educationalists with its own pro-

duction, distribution, and quality con-

trol administration. Such an answer

would have the advantages of relevance

and cost control. There would be the

problems of increase in variation with

other countries, lack of international

recognition, and problems of mainte-

nance. In addition it needs to be

appreciated that while details of treat-

ment might change, it is unlikely that

the basic system used for ATLS could be

improved; the phrase, ‘‘re-inventing the

wheel’’ comes to mind.

Before accepting this option the driv-

ing force behind the individuals and

groups wishing to see a separate UK or

European course also need to be con-

sidered. Many protagonists honestly

believe the disadvantages of staying in

the ATLS family outweigh its advan-

tages. A minority are motivated by more

transient

emotions

such


as

feeling


excluded,

xenophobia,

and

possibly


even jealousy. It is important to know

what is driving people because the costs

and

time


commitment

required


to

develop this type of course are huge,

even for the UK. If one considers a

European based course then the prob-

lems increase further. Nevertheless it is

possible and there are structures and

personnel who can do it. The question

is, are advocates for this option moti-

vated enough to keep it going over 26

years and six editions?

The final option, as described by

McKeown, is to increase the involve-

ment of international groups. In so

doing issues such as core content (for

all) and peripheral (for local needs)

could be addressed along with the

thorny issue of cost versus resources.

This solution is likely to generate enthu-

siasm, and passion because of its local

relevance while being part of an inter-

national family. However, these advan-

tages would need to be balanced against

reduced

central


control,

finances,

increased

variation,

reduced

quality


control, and an increase in organisa-

tional complexity.

In summary, from its tragic origin

ATLS has become an icon in medical

education. However, its quality control

system and administration has led to

rigidity and a perceived lack of interest

in non-US ways of managing trauma.

There is no doubt that ATLS is at a

crossroads in its development. To do

nothing runs the risk of a schism

developing. Alternatively it could adapt

to become a truly international course.

Either option will require trauma enthu-

siasts wishing to develop a more effec-

tive course for patients rather than as a

reaction to a current set of problems.

Emerg Med J 2005;22:2–3.

doi: 10.1136/emj.2004.021212

Authors’ affiliations

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P Driscoll, J Wardrope,

Joint Editors

Correspondence to: Pete Driscoll, Accident and

Emergency Department, Hope Hospital, Eccles

Old Road, Salford M6 8HD, UK;

peter.driscoll@srht.nhs.uk

REFERENCES

1 Driscoll P, Gwinnutt C, McNeill I. Controversies in

advanced trauma life support. Trauma

1999;1:171–6.

2 Nolan JP. Advanced trauma life support in the

United Kingdom: time to move on. Emerg Med J

2005;22:3–4.

3 McKeown D. Should the UK develop and run its

own advanced trauma course? EMJ

2005;22:6–7.

4 Davis M. Should there be a UK based

advanced trauma course? Emerg Med J

2005;22:5–6.

Advance trauma life support

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Advanced trauma life support in the

United Kingdom: time to move on

J P Nolan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

There are strong reasons for the UK to develop its own trauma life

support course.

W

hen the Advanced Trauma Life



Support

(ATLS)


was

intro-


duced

into


the

United


Kingdom

in

1988



it

revolutionised

trauma training for doctors who were

expected


to

treat


seriously

injured


patients.

The


American

College


of

Surgeons’ Committee on Trauma (ACS

COT) had compiled a course manual

that, in the main, represented state of

the art practice in the treatment of

major trauma. The style of teaching

was refreshing; indeed, much of medical

education in the UK has evolved into

the same scenario based interactive

format. I had the opportunity to take

the course in Baltimore, Maryland in

1989. In the following year, as an

attending

anaesthesiologist

at

the


Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, I

was then able to see the teaching

applied while resuscitating seriously

injured patients covering the range of

blunt and penetrating trauma. I gained

my ATLS instructor status while in

Baltimore and taught on two provider

courses there before returning to the

UK. When I started teaching on ATLS

courses in the UK in 1991, I was

immediately impressed by the highly

interactive format and strict adherence

to core content; both of these features

were different from my experience on

courses in United States.

Although ATLS is considered an inter-

national course, and is run in at least 23

countries (http://www.facs.org/meetings_

events/atls/region15.html), the course

content is controlled entirely by the

ACS. Like many of the early ATLS

instructors in the UK, I was led to

believe that our constructive comments

would be fed back to the ACS COT and

that this feedback would be taken into

consideration when revising the course

core content. I now know that we

were being rather naive and, despite

the best efforts by several UK ATLS

committee chairmen, our suggestions,

along with those from many other

countries, have been largely ignored. I

don’t blame our American colleagues

for being reluctant to implement sug-

gestions from other countries: they will

want to ensure that their own course

is tailored perfectly to the requirements

of doctors working in the American

healthcare system. Globally, cultures

and healthcare systems vary consider-

ably and it is unrealistic to expect a

single


course

to

suit



everyone.

A

parallel can be drawn with attempts



to develop standardised international

cardiopulmonary

resuscitation

(CPR)


guidelines

1

: despite reaching interna-



tional ‘‘consensus’’ there remain signif-

icant


differences

between


the

CPR


guidelines published by the American

Heart Association (AHA) and those of

EDITORIALS

3

www.emjonline.com



group.bmj.com

 on December 14, 2016 - Published by 

http://emj.bmj.com/

Downloaded from 



the

European


Resuscitation

Council


(ERC).

2

Regrettably, over the 15 years since I



gained my ATLS provider certificate, the

course has failed to maintain its initial

momentum and several weaknesses

have emerged:

N

The revised manual should have been



published in 2001; the current edition

was published in 1997. A compen-

dium of proposed changes appeared

two years ago and yet the ACS COT

has only just announced the expected

publication date for the 7th edition

(October 2004).

N

The course format has failed to keep



pace with developments in educa-

tion. Other life support courses have

moved almost completely away from

lectures to workshops; where lectures

remain they are delivered using high

quality PowerPoint slides. These

changes can be controlled and imple-

mented entirely by the relevant

national course committees.

N

Even with the compendium of pro-



posed changes, some of the ATLS

core content is falling behind state of

the art trauma practice; for example,

low volume fluid resuscitation.

N

The UK ATLS Committee has persis-



tently flagged up problems with the

way that airway management is

taught and yet little has been chan-

ged—this total lack of input by

specialists other than ‘‘trauma sur-

geons’’ is a reflection of American

practice—it bears no relation to prac-

tice in virtually any other country in

the world.

N

The ATLS concept has continued to



focus on the single handed physician

working in a small rural hospital (in

the United States). Although this

may have been applicable to some

parts of UK practice 15 years ago, it is

certainly not now: in most UK hos-

pitals receiving patients with serious

injuries, resuscitation is undertaken

by multidisciplinary teams. The ALS

course assumes that cardiac resusci-

tation is undertaken as a team and

training in team leadership is a funda-

mental part of the course; trauma

resuscitation should be taught in

the same way.

The fact that the course is controlled

totally by the ACS COT prevents the

Royal College of Surgeons of England

from taking it forward in the way, I am

sure, it would like to. It must be very

frustrating to see courses such as

Advanced


Paediatric

Life


Support

(APLS) and Advanced Life Support

(ALS)

evolve


rapidly

and


embrace

audiovisual technology and current edu-

cational practice.

3 4


The efficacy and cost effectiveness of

life support courses is under close

scrutiny. The high instructor to candi-

date ratios demanded by these courses

creates a significant impact on limited

NHS resources. In the case of ATLS, this

is compounded by the significant profit

made by the ACS from the sale of course

manuals. The current cost of an ATLS

manual to a course centre in the UK is

£68 and this will increase to £80 once

the new manual is released. Based on

my experience with the Resuscitation

Council (UK) ALS course manual, the

cost of printing a similar manual in the

UK would be a fraction of this figure.

Surely, the time has come for the UK

to develop its own generic trauma

course. There are already plans to

develop a European trauma course in

association with the ERC. In theory, the

concept of a European trauma course is

sensible but I envisage at least two

significant problems: firstly, interna-

tional

collaboration



will

slow


the

process of development and implemen-

tation of change; secondly, most other

European countries have far more pre-

hospital involvement by doctors than we

have in the UK and a European trauma

course is likely to have a strong pre-

hospital bias. Initially, the development

of a UK based trauma course may be the

most efficient way of getting a course

that suits the requirements of doctors in

this country. The transition from ATLS

to the UK equivalent will be problema-

tic, but this is a long term investment

and it will provide us with the ability to

have total control of trauma education

in our own country: control of the

course content will enable integration

with undergraduate curriculums in the

UK. Those of us who have been ATLS

instructors for many years have wit-

nessed a dramatic change in the enthu-

siasm and motivation among students

taking the course. This is probably partly

because most are now compelled to take

the course; in the early 1990s most of

the candidates were genuinely keen to

learn about major trauma. The recent

drop in enthusiasm may also reflect the

fact that many of the candidates have

been taught much of the ATLS content

before they attend the course.

Finally, we must consider some of the

political sensitivities and conflicts that

will have an impact on any decision to

move away from ATLS. The ATLS course

generates significant revenue for the

Royal College of Surgeons of England

as well as for the ACS. A future UK

trauma course might not be under the

administrative control of the RCS: it

might, more appropriately, be adminis-

tered by an intercollegiate body and this

will mean redistribution of revenue

away from the RCS. At the insistence

of the ACS COT, in all countries the

ATLS programme must be under the

administrative control of a national

surgical organisation. This does not

reflect the multidisciplinary nature of

the course: in the UK, 33% of ATLS

instructors are anaesthetists, 25% are

emergency physicians, 17% are ortho-

paedic surgeons, and only 11% are

general surgeons.

In summary, although the ATLS

course has been invaluable, I think that

there are several strong reasons for the

UK to develop its own trauma life

support course. The national course

committee would have the freedom to

produce a course to suit the way trauma

care is delivered in the NHS and the

resources

currently

going


to

our


American colleagues could be invested

in our own training programme.

Emerg Med J 2005;22:3–4.

doi: 10.1136/emj.2004.018507

Correspondence to: Dr J P Nolan, Department

of Anaesthesia, Royal United Hospital, Combe

Park, Bath BA1 3NG, UK; jerry.nolan@

ukgateway.net

Conflicts of interest: Jerry Nolan is vice chair-

man of the Resuscitation Council (UK) and ex-

chairman of the ALS Course Subcommittee of

the Resuscitation Council (UK).

REFERENCES

1 The American Heart Association in collaboration

with the International Liaison Committee

on Resuscitation (ILCOR)

. Guidelines 2000

for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and

emergency cardiovascular care—an international

consensus on science. Resuscitation

2000;46:1–447.

2 De Latorre F, Nolan J, Robertson C, et al.

European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2000:

adult advanced life support. A statement from the

Advanced Life Support Working Group and

approved by the Executive Committee of the

European Resuscitation Council. Resuscitation

2001;48:211–21.

3 Mackway-Jones K, Molyneix E, Phillips B,

et al. Advanced paediatric life support. The

practical approach. 3rd ed. London: BMJ Books,

2001.


4 Nolan J, Baskett P, Gabbott D, et al. Advanced

life support course provider manual. 4th ed.

London: Resuscitation Council (UK), 2001.

4

EDITORIALS



www.emjonline.com

group.bmj.com

 on December 14, 2016 - Published by 

http://emj.bmj.com/

Downloaded from 


Advanced trauma life support

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Should there be a UK based advanced

trauma course?

M Davis

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .



An educator’s perspective

T

here is a good educational case for a



UK advanced trauma course. The

theoretical basis for the educational

component

of

the



ATLS

instructor

course is rarely made explicit and in

my experience, never discussed, either

among the educationalists or the clinical

faculty. In UK practice there is an

implied theoretical perspective within

the ATLS course that is not subscribed

to. In this article I aim to explore this

theoretical basis and contrast it with

what actually happens in instructor and

provider courses in the UK. In doing so

the educational justification for a UK

based advanced trauma course will be

discussed.

THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF

ATLS

Despite nods in the direction of ‘‘adult



education’’

1

and ‘‘reflective practice’’,



2

much of the thinking behind section

III chapter 2 of the ATLS instructor

course manual

3

is based on the beha-



viourist/instructional design educational

theories of Gagne

´.

4

This, however, is not



made explicit other than in this defini-

tion of learning:

‘‘learning is a relatively permanent

change in behaviour that comes

about as a result of a planned

experience in which learning results

from the interaction between what

students already know, the new

information they encounter and

what they do as they learn’’ (page

807)

3

The



perspective

is

supported



by

Gagne


´’s view that ‘‘learning is some-

thing that takes place inside a person’s

head—in the brain’’.

4

DIFFERENCE FROM US PRACTICE



In contrast with Gagne’s view, the UK

based ATLS course shows:

N

Attention to the needs of individuals



and the groups to which they are

allocated;

N

The development of a sense of a



critical and self critical orientation

towards performance;

N

Modelling of appropriate behaviour



by members of the clinical faculty;

N

Opportunities to engage in practice;



N

Opportunities to engage in formal

and informal discussion with fellow

course members and faculty.

All of the above contribute to the

development of a ‘‘community of prac-

tice’’.

5

This is based almost exclusively on my



personal experience, supplemented by

anecdotal evidence from clinical collea-

gues. It is further enhanced by attempts

to theorise about the nature of the

underpinnings of the ALSG generic

instructor course.

6

This seems to be in noticeable con-



trast with the provision in the US where

issues of collaboration and community

are subsumed to availability of faculty

and the capacity for the course content

to speak for itself. In this latter respect,

particularly, the course becomes the

manual and the manual, the course.

This somewhat robotic approach is

not untypical of US higher and con-

tinuing education and while it seems

efficient in terms of delivering some

key content messages, it does little

to

embed


them

in

practice



and

performance.

EMERGING THEORETICAL DESIGN

OF UK PRACTICE

I have been an educator with ATLS since

1997 and for a little longer with ALSG,

which shares a substantial cadre of

clinical trainers. What is apparent is

that while there is a degree of variation

of provision, depending on the medical

director, the clinical faculty, and the

educator, there is a strong sense of what

it means to be an ATLS provider or

instructor.

The

work


of

Lave


and

Wenger seems to underpin much of

the practice that has emerged from the

interactions of senior faculty groups

gaining familiarity with the US model

and, I would argue, subverting some of

its intentions and ‘‘domesticating’’ it.

Accordingly, I am drawn to the conclu-

sion that a UK version of an advanced

trauma course would be best des-

cribed by Lave and Wenger’s ‘‘situated

cognition’’ and its focus on the ‘‘com-

munity of learning’’.

7

MERIT IN CLARIFICATION OF UK



DESIGN

Practice over 15 years has determined to

a large extent the nature of UK ATLS

provision. In the event of the UK

Steering Group deciding to launch its

own course, there will be the opportu-

nity to articulate practice: to make

explicit the tacit practices that have

grown up. This will have a number of

clear benefits:

N

to guarantee continuity of provision



both in terms of style and content

N

to set a standard that will be main-



tained despite the differences among

faculty


N

to acknowledge responsibility for

change in provision in the light of

changes in the environment.

STEPS TO DESIGN AND

IMPLEMENTATION

Clearly, any attempt to create a new

course, substantially based on existing

UK practices and perceptions of best

clinical performance, will have quite a

long time scale. This, however, can be

turned


to

advantage,

allowing

for,


among other things, a systematic needs

analysis (drawing from current activity

in

the


Faculty

of

Accident



and

Emergency Medicine (manuscript in

preparation) and a thorough exploration

of stakeholder expectations. Inevitably

issues of design will include an evalua-

tion of the potential of new technologies

to either supplement or replace current

provision. For example, the European

Resuscitation Council in collaboration

with Giunti Laboratories has developed

a virtual course that may lay the

foundations for some aspects of this

provision.

CONCLUSIONS

If only for the reasons of transparency

and greater congruence between theory

(where it is articulated) and practice,

there is a good educational case for a UK

advanced

trauma


course.

Anecdotal

evidence hints that US courses live out

Gagne


´’s assertion that ‘‘learning is

something that takes place inside a

person’s head—in the brain’’, whereas

the practice that has grown up in the

UK is that learning is a collaborative

venture firmly located in the social.

Emerg Med J 2005;22:5–6.

doi: 10.1136/emj.2004.020578

Correspondence to: Dr M Davis, Department of

Social and Psychological Science, Edge Hill

College of Higher Education, St Helens Road,

Ormskirk LA39 4QP, UK; mikedavis8702@

aol.com

EDITORIALS



5

www.emjonline.com

group.bmj.com

 on December 14, 2016 - Published by 

http://emj.bmj.com/

Downloaded from 



REFERENCES

1 Knowles M. The modern practice of adult

education: andragogy versus pedagogy. New

York: Association Press, 1970.

2 Scho¨n D. Educating the reflective practitioner. San

Francisco: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1983.

3 ATLS. Instructor course manual. Chicago:

American College of Surgeons, 1997.

4 Gagne´ R. The conditions of learning. 4th ed.

Orlando: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1985.

5 Wenger E. Communities of practice: learning,

meaning and identity. Cambridge: Cambridge

University Press, 1998.

6 Davis M, Conaghan P. An examination of the

theoretical persoectives underlying the ALSG

generic instructors course. Medical Teacher

2002;24:1.

7 Lave J, Wenger E. Situated learning: legitimate

peripheral participation. Cambridge: Cambridge

University Press, 1991.

Advanced trauma life support

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Should the UK develop and run its own

advanced trauma course?

D McKeown

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The strong ATLS infrastructure can provide a basis for the

production of a truly international trauma course

I

first heard of ATLS when I was a very



junior consultant in anaesthesia and

ICU. I had attended a meeting at

which a (quite famous) intensivist had

said that all major trauma patients

should

be

anaesthetised,



paralysed,

intubated, have bilateral chest drains

inserted, and undergo diagnostic perito-

neal lavage. He claimed that this (in my

view, dangerous) philosophy was taught

at ATLS courses. These courses had only

just been introduced to the UK, and

were being supported by the Royal

College of Surgeons of England.

I therefore sought out an ATLS course

to attend as a confirmed sceptic. It is a

tribute to the teaching and quality of

that course (Guildford, since you ask)

that I became convinced that ATLS,

although ‘‘American’’ in flavour, had

much to offer UK trauma care at that

time. I also learnt that much of what is

said in criticism of ATLS is said by

people who know very little about it.

It is difficult to believe how disorga-

nised much of the trauma care in the

UK was at that time. Many small

hospitals not far removed from the

‘‘community hospital’’ of the triage

scenarios received seriously ill trauma

victims with only a senior house officer

in the casualty department, and no

other post-registration doctor on site.

Early resuscitation was haphazard and

poorly coordinated.

ATLS courses, instructors, and provi-

ders began to be part of a change

process, which improved the system

considerably throughout the UK. This

was not solely attributable to ATLS, but

the introduction of these courses to

areas provided a focus for interested

local parties, and acted as a catalyst to

encourage change and reorganisation.

Alliances were forged for local clinical

teams, and nationally between multiple

specialties.

I feel we must also acknowledge the

enormous contribution that ATLS has

made to encouraging and developing

the teaching of medicine and practical

procedures. There were, to be sure,

courses in education, but few offered

the common sense and practicalities of

an ATLS instructor course.

So ATLS became an integral part of

UK medical training either through

formalised and official courses, or in

practical in-service teaching. The UK

had, after an initial flirtation with a

‘‘fundamentalist’’ reading of the man-

ual, generally accepted that the core

system provided a logical guide to initial

management of the trauma victim. The

American focus of the manual even

began to take over—although I have

not


been

referred


a

‘‘diaphoretic’’

patient,

they


have

certainly

been

‘‘obtunded’’ or ‘‘combative’’. This was



seen as an amusing quirk, whcih could,

and would, be solved in future editions.

The American College of Surgeons

(ACS) has been, however, slow to

change much of the course content or

materials. In many cases, that delay has

been supported by subsequent research

and clinical protocols—those who have

loudly criticised the use of crystalloid

solutions are less vociferous since the

publication of the SAFE study from

Australia, for example. Other changes

did not seem to accept good evidence,

which was passed to the ACS by

members of the UK ATLS National

Committee, which I was a member of

for some years. For anaesthetists, the

description of drug assisted intubation

for adults and children remained con-

tentious, and the lack of appreciation of

the role of emergency physicians and

anaesthetists in the management of

trauma in the UK and other countries

was frustrating.

The manual has been, where possible,

evidence based, and therefore has rarely

promoted new and unproven techni-

ques. Some feel, however, that this has

made the manual less up to date.

Techniques that would bear introduc-

tion or discussion could include the use

of restricted volume resuscitation as a

part of care including early access to

surgery, or damage control surgery and

critical care involvement. These are

certainly topics that are raised at UK

courses, and their lack tends to detract

from the title advanced trauma life

support.

Do these concerns mean that we

should leave the ‘‘ATLS family’’ and

start a UK course? Like all those who

threaten to leave the family home,

perhaps we need to think clearly before

acting.

ATLS still provides a strong, simple



message, which is easily taught to all

grades and disciplines. The UK and

allied countries teach it in a way that

emphasises the importance of its under-

lying

principles,



and

tolerate


and

explain differences in US practice that

are in the manual. The fundamental

message is, I believe, still clear and

relevant to our practice.

It would not be difficult to find a

group of enthusiastic UK doctors with

experience, and a real interest, in

improving trauma care and teaching

others to produce a manual more

accurately aimed at UK practice. What

would be difficult would be getting

them to agree absolutely on a single

approach,

phrasing

that


unambigu-

ously, and producing copy to a deadline

with appropriate references. They would

also have to agree to revise it all again to

ensure the next edition of the manual

was up to date.

The UK is not the centre of trauma

care in the world. There are other groups

of

clinicians



who

also


see

similar


patterns of trauma to the UK, with

strong clinical and research links to

ourselves—both

in

Europe



and

Australasia. Any new teaching develop-

ment should logically involve them in

course development and expansion. We

have much to learn from them—for

example, I feel the best organised ATLS

course system in the world is probably

the Danish one.

6

EDITORIALS



www.emjonline.com

group.bmj.com

 on December 14, 2016 - Published by 

http://emj.bmj.com/

Downloaded from 


These

groups


of

Europeans

and

Australasians currently are united in



their wish to give constructive feedback

to the ACS, with the aim of continuing

to improve a course that has trans-

formed trauma care worldwide. In many

ways the course, which originated in the

continental United States, has grown to

provide a true international language of

trauma


care. However,

that


course

desperately needs to more accurately

reflect the variation in trauma patterns

and systems existing outwith the USA.

I personally believe that it can do so,

without diluting the overall message, if

the ACS are willing to listen. I feel that

they are beginning to appreciate that the

overall teaching, course organisation,

and quality control in the UK, Europe,

and Australasia exceeds that of many of

their courses. Guest ATLS instructors

teaching on US courses are often dis-

appointed at the quality of teaching and

lack of coherent faculty involvement.

Perhaps the ACS should reflect on the

similarities between the origins of their

own great country—when the ‘‘colo-

nials’’ expressed their concerns that a

central and distant organising authority

failed to appreciate the particular prob-

lems of local issues—and the expansion

of a course that truly needs to be less

American, and more international. A

Boston Tea Party with consignment of

course manuals to the bottom of the

Atlantic should be avoided at all costs.

We should never fail to appreciate,

however, the vision and enormous

efforts of the originators of ATLS in

the US, and the evangelical zeal that has

made it the worldwide success that it

undoubtedly is.

I conclude that, if the ACS were to

show a serious willingness to take

constructive feedback from European,

Australasian, and other medical sys-

tems,


a

truly


international

trauma


course could be produced that would

build on the strong ATLS infrastructure

present in many countries. To fail to do

so risks destruction of the current

international coalition of like minded

trauma practitioners.

Emerg Med J 2005;22:6–7.

doi: 10.1136/emj.2004.020487

Correspondence to: Dr D McKeown,

Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Infirmary

of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent,

Edinburgh EH16 4SA, UK; dermot.mckeown@

ed.ac.uk

EDITORIALS

7

www.emjonline.com



group.bmj.com

 on December 14, 2016 - Published by 

http://emj.bmj.com/

Downloaded from 



advanced trauma course?

Should the UK develop and run its own

D McKeown

doi: 10.1136/emj.2004.020487

2005 22: 6-7 



Emerg Med J 

 

http://emj.bmj.com/content/22/1/6

Updated information and services can be found at: 

These include:

service

Email alerting

box at the top right corner of the online article. 

Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article. Sign up in the

Collections

Topic

Articles on similar topics can be found in the following collections 

 (187)

Adult intensive care



 (606)

Resuscitation

 (235)

Other anaesthesia



Notes

http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions

To request permissions go to:



http://journals.bmj.com/cgi/reprintform

To order reprints go to:



http://group.bmj.com/subscribe/

To subscribe to BMJ go to:

group.bmj.com

 on December 14, 2016 - Published by 

http://emj.bmj.com/

Downloaded from 




Yüklə 84,13 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə