A checklist of the Vascular Plants of Lao pdr 쾨¡¾ ¡¸¦º®²õª½¡÷ ´ó쿪í À¯ñ ¢Ó ¢º¤ ¦¯¯ 쾸



Yüklə 2,64 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/41
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü2,64 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   41

A Checklist of the Vascular Plants of Lao PDR

쾨¡¾ ¡¸©¦º®²õ©ª½¡÷ ´ó쿪í À¯ñ ¢Ó ¢º¤ ¦¯¯ ì¾¸ 

A Checklist of the Vascular Plants of Lao PDR

Mark Newman, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Sounthone Ketphanh, Forestry Research Centre,  

National Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute, Laos



Bouakhaykhone Svengsuksa, Department of Biology,  

Faculty of Science, National University of Laos



Philip Thomas, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Khamphone Sengdala, Forestry Research Centre,  

National Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute, Laos



Vichith Lamxay, Department of Biology, Faculty of  

Science, National University of Laos



Kate Armstrong, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

쾨¡¾ ¡¸©¦º®²õ©ª½¡÷ ´ó쿪í À¯ñ ¢Ó ¢º¤ ¦¯¯ ì¾¸ 

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

20A Inverleith Row

Edinburgh EH3 5LR

Scotland, UK

Reproduction of any part of this publication for educational, conservation and 

other non-profit purposes is authorised without prior permission from the 

copyright holder, provided that the source is fully acknowledged.

First published 2007

ISBN 978-1-906129-04-0

Front cover: Murdannia macrocarpa D.Y.Hong, Newman et al. LAO 706. Photo, 

P.I. Thomas, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Back cover: Forest on limestone karst, Mahaxay District, Khammouan. Photo, P.I. 

Thomas, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh 


v

C

ontents

Acknowledgements   _______________________________________________  vi

Introduction  ____________________________________________________  1

Introduction in Lao   _____________________________________________  17

The Checklist  __________________________________________________  25

1. Spore-bearing Plants  _________________________________________  25

2. Gymnosperms  ______________________________________________  34

3. Angiosperms  _______________________________________________  38

Introduced, Cultivated and Naturalized Species   _______________________ 367

Index to the Plant Genera of Lao PDR  _______________________________ 375



vi

A

Cknowledgements

This project is funded by grant 13007 from the Darwin Initiative to the Royal Botanic 

Garden Edinburgh and its three Laotian partners, namely the Forestry Research Centre, 

part of the National Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute, the Department of 

Biology, Faculty of Science at the National University of Laos and IUCN Lao PDR.

We are particularly indebted to the Watershed Management and Protection Authority 

of Nakai Nam Theun National Protected Area which gave permission to our project to 

train botanists and collect plants within their area.

We thank the Director of the National Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute 

and the Dean of the Faculty of Science, National University of Laos who have welcomed 

this project and ensured that it had all the necessary permits to run smoothly. In Lao PDR 

we should also like to thank Mr Banxa Thammavong, Mr Singkone Saynhalat and Ms 

Phayvone Phonphanom from the Forest Research Center, Mr Soulivanh Lanorsavanh 

and Ms Phetlasy Souladet from the National University of Lao PDR for their enthusiastic 

support during the project. Mike Callaghan, ECOLAO generously allowed us to use an 

electronic version of his publication ‘Checklist of Lao Plant Names.’ Joost Foppes and 

Martin Greijmans from Stichting Nederlandse Vrijwilligers (SNV) and Pierre Bonnet 

and Pierre Grard from the Orchisasia and BIOTIK projects also provided knowledge, 

advice and support.

Thanks are due to Andrew Ingles and the Bangkok office of IUCN for their support of 

our collaboration with IUCN Lao PDR. We gratefully acknowledge the support, advice 

and hospitality of Dr Kongkanda Chayamarit and Dr Rachun Pooma at the Bangkok 

Forestry Herbarium.

We also acknowledge the help of many experts on plant groups who have named 

plants  for  us  and  contributed  information.  Among  the  many  people  who  have 

contributed their time and knowledge are Paul Keßler, Colin Ridsdale, Frits Adema, 

Cornelius Berg, André Schuiteman, Luc Willemse, Willem de Wilde & Brigitte de Wilde-

Duyfjes from Leiden, Sovanmoly Hul from Paris, Christian Puff from Vienna, Robert 

Faden from the Smithsonian Institute, David Middleton, Martin Pullan, Colin Pendry, 

Robert Mill, David Chamberlain, Christopher Fraser-Jenkins from RBG Edinburgh and 

Dave Simpson, Mark Coode and Rafael Govaerts from RBG Kew. We should also like 

to thank the herbarium staff at RBG Edinburgh for their support and help along with 

the curators of the herbaria at Leiden and Paris for facilitating access to their collections 

and information.





I

ntroductIon

General introduction to floristics in Lao PDR

The flora of Lao PDR is one of the least known in Asia, though it was revised in 

the Flore générale de l’Indochine (Lecomte 907–950) and is being revised again in 

the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et du Viêtnam (Aubréville 960–present). The reason 

this flora is so poorly known is that very few people have spent time studying and 

collecting in Lao PDR with the result that there are very few herbarium specimens 

available.

Both the flora-writing projects just mentioned have treated Lao PDR together 

with its neighbours, Cambodia and Vietnam and the great majority of specimens 

cited  in  them  are  from  Vietnam  where  botanical  collecting  has  always  been 

more intensive than in Lao PDR or Cambodia. Nowadays, responsibility for the 

conservation  and  management  of  biodiversity  rests  with  national  governments, 

however, so there is a great need for an overview of the plants of Lao PDR, separate 

from those of Cambodia and Vietnam. At its simplest, a list of the names of plants 

occurring in Lao PDR would be extremely valuable.

Prior to this publication, two checklists for the plants of Lao PDR have been 

published. The first, Noms vernaculaires de Plantes en Usage au Laos (Vidal 959), 

listed  more  than  000  species  with  their  local  names  and  uses.  The  second,  the 

Checklist of Lao Plant Names (Callaghan 2004) lists more than 2000 taxa, including 

more than 300 cultivated and introduced plants. This second checklist is primarily 

based on Vidal’s work, the fascicles of the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et du Viêtnam 

that have been published since 960 and a range of unpublished field surveys. These 

checklists focus on useful plants and therefore only represent a limited section of 

the flora. The need to conserve and manage the flora at national level is now greater 

than ever so it is even more important to develop a National Checklist.

History of plant collecting

The first botanical collectors in Lao PDR were all French. Clovis Thorel was the first 

to make a significant contribution, collecting along the Mekong in southern and central 

Lao PDR from 866–868. He was followed by Jules Harmand who also worked mainly 

in the south in the 870s. These pioneers were followed by Henri D’Orléans (892, 

in northern Lao PDR), Clément Dupuy (900, around Louangphrabang) and Jean-

Baptiste Counillon (909, along the Mekong). The most prolific collector in the 20th 

century was Eugène Poilane who worked in various provinces of Lao PDR from the 

920s–940s. At the same time Camille Joseph Spire was collecting in Xiengkhouang. 

More detail about the flora and collectors in Cambodia, Lao PDR and Vietnam may be 

found in the “tome préliminaire” to the Flore générale de l’Indochine (Gagnepain 944).


2

Historical events all but prevented botanical work in Lao PDR between World 

War II and the 990s though some collections were made by Jules Vidal, Pierre Tixier 

and Allen D. Kerr in the 950s and early 960s. Taking all these Laotian collections 

together, it is possible to calculate that roughly 3 specimens per 00 km² have been 

collected in Lao PDR up until the early 990s. For comparison to neighbouring 

countries and to the United Kingdom, see Table .

Table 1. Collection density of herbarium specimens (D.J. Middleton 2003 & pers. comm.).

Country

No. of specimens per 100 km²

Cambodia


4

Lao PDR


3

Vietnam


14

Thailand


50

United Kingdom

1700

Starting around 990, Lao botanists began to intensify their study of the flora, 



often in cooperation with foreign scientists. They have contributed to accounts of 

families for the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et du Viêt Nam and several broadly 

based forestry projects with a taxonomic component, such as the DANIDA funded 

Lao  Tree  Seed  Project  (LTSP)  that  formed  part  of  the  regional  Indochina  Tree 

Seed Project. A significant output of this project was the manual, Forests and Trees 

of the Central Highlands of Xieng Khouang (Lehmann et al. 2003). Other studies 

have focussed on plants which yield non-timber forest products such as rattans or 

medicinal plants (for example Evans et al. 200, Somsanith Bouamanivong 2005) or 

on particular National Protected Areas (Maxwell, 999; Chansamone Phongoudom, 

2000).  Orchids  have  been  of  special  interest  and  there  has  been  a  considerable 

increase in our knowledge of this group (Schuiteman & De Vogel 2004, Svengsuksa 

&  Lamxay  2005).  This  is  continuing  through  the  work  of  the  ORCHIS  project 

(www.orchisasia.org/), a collaboration between the National University of Lao PDR 

(NUoL), Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le 

Développement (CIRAD) and the Nationaal Herbarium Nederland. Other botanical 

work that is currently under way in Lao PDR includes Biodiversity Informatics and 

co-Operation in Taxonomy for Interactive shared Knowledge base (BIOTIK), an 

EU funded project concentrating on large tree species, and a number of MSc and 

PhD ethnobotanical projects based at NUoL and Uppsala University.

The resurgence of botanical work over the last 5 years has generated a significant 

amount of new information and it seems timely to produce a new checklist that 

collates as much of this information as possible.

INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION

3

A checklist of the vascular plants of Lao PDR

This new checklist has been generated from a computer database compiled as 

part of the Darwin Initiative project Taxonomic Training in a Neglected Biodiversity 

Hotspot in Lao PDR.

The information in this checklist derives from several sources. The first was an 

electronic version of Latin names contained in Callaghan’s ‘Checklist of Lao Plant 

Names’ (Callaghan 2004) and generously donated by the compiler. The second is 

the specimen based accounts in the fascicles of the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et 

du Viêtnam that have either been published since 960 or are due to be published in 

the near future. For each taxon, at least one specimen per province was selected for 

inclusion in the database.

The third source are the records of specimens collected during recent botanical 

projects in Lao PDR (see above). In most cases the specimens are lodged in Lao 

herbaria with duplicate sets at Paris (P), Edinburgh (E) and Leiden (L). These sources 

have been supplemented by electronic downloads of specimen records from each 

herbarium’s database as well as specimen based information derived from recent 

taxonomic accounts of new species or revisions of families and genera that have 

been published in botanical journals.

In  addition  to  the  specimen  based  records,  a  range  of  non-specimen  based 

electronic and printed literature sources have been used. Published and unpublished 

accounts for the Flora of Thailand and the Flora of China have been consulted and 

taxa that have been noted to occur in Lao PDR included in the checklist. The World 

Checklist Series, both published and as available on the internet (www.kew.org/

wcsp/home.do) has also been used. These records are not directly supported by 

specimens and are therefore not as reliable. Table 2 (pages 7–2) gives details of the 

primary information sources used to verify the names within each family. A full 

reference can be found in the bibliography that follows Table 2.



Content of the checklist

The  checklist  includes  4,850  species  of  native,  introduced,  cultivated  and 

naturalized vascular plants (see Table 3). Of these, 3,688 are supported by at least 

one of the 9,500 specimens in the database – records for the remaining species are 

based on the literature sources mentioned above. A list of the species that we know 

to be introduced, cultivated or naturalized is included as Table 4 (pages 367–373) 

and can be found at the end of the checklist, before the index to the genera.


INTRODUCTION

4

Table 3. Generalized statistics based on the species recorded in this checklist.



Number of 

families

Number of 

genera

Number of 

species

Spore Bearing 

Plants

24

44



139

Gymnosperms

7

12



24

Angiosperms

201


1468

4687


Total

231

1524

4850

Limitations of the data

The checklist is derived from a very incomplete data set. The original Flore générale 

de l’Indochine has only been partly revised for the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et 

du Viêtnam and several large families or groups such as the ferns, Annonaceae, 

Compositae and Gramineae have yet to be included. As revisions of these families 

are completed, then many more species will be added. Additionally the majority of 

specimens that have been collected in Lao PDR are deposited in Paris and only a 

small proportion of these specimens have been databased.

The specimen records provide some indication for the distribution of each species 

within Lao PDR and for the number of species documented from each province. 

Figure  shows the number of species in this checklist recorded from each province. 

The floras of the four northwestern provinces of Bokeo, Louang Namtha, Oudomxai 

and Phongsali and the southeastern province of Xekong are very poorly represented 

within the checklist. This is probably due to their remoteness from the main travel 

routes in the early 20th century when collectors such as Poilane were active and the 

relatively few projects that have been active since 990. Khammouan and Champasak 

have the highest numbers due to the presence of significant National Protected Areas 

(NPAs) and recent botanical projects that have focussed on those areas.



Presentation of names

The spore-bearing plants, the gymnosperms and the angiosperms are presented 

separately.  Though  these  groups  have  little  support  in  modern  phylogenetic 

classifications they are used in the layout of most herbaria and individual botanists 

tend to specialize in only one of these groups.

Within  these  three  groups,  the  families  are  listed  in  alphabetical  order,  then 

the genera are alphabetical in each family and the species within each genus. The 

families, and the placement of genera in each individual families is broadly consistent 

with the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et du Viêtnam but with some modifications 

that  reflect  recent  taxonomic  changes.  To  facilitate  the  use  of  this  checklist,  an 



INTRODUCTION

5

alphabetical list of the genera is given at the end of the checklist and should be used 



to look up individual species.

Accepted  names  are  shown  in  bold  face  with  their  authors.  When  there  is  a 

basionym, it follows the accepted name in the same paragraph. Synonyms are in 

italics and are listed alphabetically, along with their accepted name.

For example, here is part of the account of the genus Meliosma:

Meliosma Blume

Millingtonia Roxb.

Meliosma buchananifolia Merr. = Meliosma henryi subsp. thorelii (Lecomte) Beusekom

Meliosma henryi Diels

Laos: Houaphan: E. Poilane 867 (L). Louangphrabang: C. Thorel 2488 (L).

Meliosma henryi subsp. thorelii (Lecomte) Beusekom – Meliosma thorelii Lecomte – Type: 

Louangphrabang, C. Thorel 3483 (holo P).

Meliosma buchananifolia Merr.

Laos: Louangphrabang: C. Thorel 3483 (P – Type of Meliosma thorelii Lecomte).

Figure 1. Numbers of species in each province based on specimen records. Species may occur 

in more than one province.



6

INTRODUCTION

The genus Meliosma, which appears in bold face, is accepted. Millingtonia Roxb. 

is a synonym of Meliosma.

Meliosma buchananifolia Merr. is a synonym of Meliosma henryi subsp. thorelii 

(Lecomte) Beusekom, as indicated by the equals sign, =.



Meliosma henryi Diels is an accepted species which has been collected in Houaphan 

Province by Poilane and in Louangphrabang by Thorel. Both these specimens are at 

the Nationaal Herbarium Nederland, Leiden University Branch (L).

Meliosma henryi subsp. thorelii (Lecomte) Beusekom is an accepted species 

which  is  based  on 

Meliosma  thorelii  Lecomte. The  type  specimen  is  Thorel’s 

collection  3483  which  is  at  the  herbarium  of  the  Muséum  National  d’Histoire 

naturelle  in  Paris  (P).  The  specimen  was  collected  in  Louangphrabang  and  is  a 

holotype specimen of both Meliosma thorelii Lecomte and Meliosma henryi subsp. 



thorelii (Lecomte) Beusekom. These names are called “homotypic” because they 

share the same type specimen. Meliosma buchananifolia Merr., on the other hand, is 

a heterotypic synonym of Meliosma henryi subsp. thorelii (Lecomte) Beusekom. 

It has a different type specimen which is not cited here.

Specimens are cited next, listed by province. The collector’s name, collection 

number and herbarium location are given. Collector’s names are reduced to the 

first name to save space. For example, all collections by Newman, M.F., Thomas, P., 

Armstrong, K.E., Sengdala, K. & Lamxay, V. are listed as M.F. Newman.

If all the species listed in a genus are synonyms of species in other genera, this 

means that the genus does not occur in Lao PDR, for example



Gastonia Comm. ex Lam.

Gastonia palmata Roxb. ex Lindl. = Trevesia palmata (Lindl.) Vis.

There are no accepted species of Gastonia in the list so there is currently no 

record of the genus in Lao PDR but Gastonia appears in bold face which indicates 

that it is an accepted genus with accepted species in other countries. If Gastonia was 

a synonym, then it would appear in italics, with its corresponding accepted name 

in bold.

Major literature references used for verifying names of species and 

their and occurrence in Lao PDR

The following table summarizes the main literature references that have been 

used to verify the presence of a particular taxon within Lao PDR. Major references 

are listed first and indicated by ‘[].’ In some cases these references may only be 

relevant to a single genus. Secondary and subsequent references are indicated by 

‘[2]’  or  ‘[3].’  ‘FCLV’  refers  to  published  or,  for  Apocynaceae  and  Polygalaceae, 

unpublished fascicles in the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et du Viêtnam. ‘FoT’ refers 


INTRODUCTION

7

to published accounts in the Flora of Thailand. ‘FoC’ with a volume number refers to 



unpublished accounts in preparation for the Flora of China. These are are available 

from  http://hua.huh.harvard.edu/china/mss/alphabetical_families.htm.  Published 

accounts from the Flora of China are referred to by their first author and year of 

publication. Full references can be found in the bibliography that follows this table 

and precedes the main checklist.

Table 2. Major literature references used for verifying names and occurrence in Lao PDR.  

[1] – main reference. [2 and 3] – secondary and subsequent references. FCLV – Flore du 

Cambodge, du Laos et du Viêtnam. FoT – Flora of Thailand. FoC – Flora of China.

Family

References for checklist bibliography

Acanthaceae

[1] Wood & Scotland (2006) [2] FoC Vol. 19 unpublished draft

Aceraceae

[1] Van Gelderen (1994) 

Acoraceae

[1] Govaerts & Frodin (2002) 

Actinidiaceae

[1] FoT Vol. 2(2)

Adiantaceae

[1] Smith et al (2006)

Alangiaceae

[1] FCLV Vol. 8. [2] Govaerts (2006) online World Checklist

Alismataceae

[1] Govaerts (2006) online World Checklist

Amaranthaceae

[1] FCLV Vol. 24

Amaryllidaceae

[1] Govaerts (2006) online World Checklist

Anacardiaceae

[1] FCLV Vol. 2.

Ancistrocladaceae

[1] Govaerts (2006) online World Checklist

Annonaceae

[1] Weerasooriya & Saunders (2005) [2] Meade (2005) 

Apocynaceae

[1] FCLV draft (under review)

Aquifoliaceae

[1] FoC Vol. 12 unpublished draft

Araceae


[1] Govaerts & Frodin (2002) [2] Murata (2005) 

Araliaceae

[1] Frodin & Govaerts (2004) [2] Jebb (1998) 

Aristolochiaceae

[1] FoT Vol. 5(1)

Asclepiadaceae

[1] Livschultz et al (2005)

Aspleniaceae

[1] Smith et al (2006)

Athyriaceae

[1] Smith et al (2006)

Balanophoraceae

[1] FCLV Vol. 14

Bassellaceae

[1] FCLV Vol. 24

Begoniaceae

[1] Hughes (2007) 

Betulaceae

[1] Li Peiqiong & Skvortsov (1999) [2] Govaerts (2006) online 

World Checklist

Bignoniaceae

[1] FCLV Vol. 22



8

INTRODUCTION




Yüklə 2,64 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   41




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə