Training systems for endoscopic soft-tissue surgery Review report – gr/L80577/01 Researchers



Yüklə 0.83 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix26.05.2017
ölçüsü0.83 Mb.

GR/ L80577: Review report, April 2001

1

Training systems for endoscopic soft-tissue surgery



Review report – GR/L80577/01

Researchers: Professor B.L. Davies, Principal Investigator

                       Dr. M.P.S.F. Gomes-Bharath, Research Associate

                       Mr. A.R.W. Barrett, PhD student

                       Mr. A.G. Timoney, Consultant Urologist

                       Mr. P.V.S. Kumar, Clinical Research Fellow

Duration:      1 April 1998 to 31 March 2001

Value: £141,335

Abbreviations

A/D:


Analogue to Digital

CASMS:


Computer-Assisted Surgical Monitoring System

CASTS: 


Computer-Assisted Surgical Training System

GUI:


Graphical User Interface

IRED:


Infra-Red Emitter Diode

MIMLab:


Mechatronics in Medicine Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering,

Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine

NURBS:

Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines



OR:

Operating Room

PC:

Personal Computer



TURP:

TransUrethral Resection of the Prostate

VR:

Virtual Reality



1. Project objectives

The original objectives, as presented in the grant proposal, are:

a)

 

To identify generic criteria for in vitro and in vivo computer-based endoscopic surgery training



aids.

b)

 



To provide a camera-based tracking system with fixed model prostate phantom as a computer-

based in vitro prostatectomy training aid.

c)

 

To provide a tracking system and ultrasound measurement facility as a computer-based in vivo



prostatectomy training aid.

2. Background/ context

TURP has been described as the most difficult operation to learn and to teach. Training is passive

initially as the trainee observes the trainer perform the operation. After a certain period of observation,

the trainee is allowed to perform the operation under close supervision, without any transition between

observation and practice. The trainers themselves may be sometimes unaware of some of the

difficulties the trainee can encounter.

There are a few courses available to the trainee where more theoretical knowledge can be gained.

These courses also utilise practical skills stations where the trainee performs a TURP under supervision

on a resectable prostate model.

In addition, the Calman training scheme for higher surgical training, introduced in the United

Kingdom since 1993, has reduced the training period significantly. The possibility of a European

directive, which may further reduce training hours, is becoming realistic and may compound this

factor. All these facts highlight the need for a simple, realistic teaching aid for this operation that will

provide active feedback.

3. Methodological approach and achievements against objectives

Objective 1 was addressed in lengthy discussions between the researchers at Imperial College and the

clinical collaborators. Different scenarios were presented in the meetings, drawing on existing research

on surgical training, surgical simulation and computer-assisted surgical systems, on observations of

surgical procedures, as well as on previous research work at MIMLab.

Objective 2 was realised in the development of CASTS, by instrumenting surgical tools for optical

tracking and providing global positional information of the tools in relation to a prostate phantom



GR/ L80577: Review report, April 2001

2

inserted in a mock-up abdomen. CASTS was fully tried by the surgical collaborators and the findings



were used as an input to CASMS.

Objective 3 was attained by designing a second generation of tools, fully sterilisable, and by

developing a method for building the patient’s prostate model from transrectal ultrasound scans. Ethics

Committee approval was obtained for the operating room trials. Components of CASMS were

successfully tested in the OR and the test of the integrated system is underway (see section 6 for

justification).

4. Project’s summary

The prostate gland is a male organ and surrounds the urethra at the bladder outlet (below, left). With

age, a benign enlargement of the tissue can develop, leading to obstruction of the bladder outlet and

urine retention. Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP) aims to alleviate the urinary

constriction by debulking the enlarged tissue from within the urethra.

The urologist carries out a

TURP using a resectoscope

inserted through the shaft of the

penis, under endoscopic

guidance (right).

In CASTS (left), the trainee

resects a prostate phantom,

inserted in a mock-up abdomen,

using standard real surgical

tools, instrumented for optical

tracking (right). A GUI displays

a model of the phantom, the

position of the resectoscope and

the tissue resected.

Three aspects of the surgical tools were instrumented. The first relates to the resectoscope’s position

and orientation. Three generations of IRED tools for optical tracking were developed. The first

prototype  (below, left) is a 100mm-diameter aluminium ring, with 8 metallic IREDs along its

perimeter, at equally spaced intervals. The second (below, centre) is made of a lighter material and has

12 metallic IREDs for improved visibility. The third (below, right) has 14 ceramic IREDs in a non-

coplanar arrangement for improved accuracy, and it can be sterilised. It has been especially designed

for CASMS (OR).

The position of the cutting loop in relation to the resectoscope’s sheath is also known. For CASTS, a

potentiometer arrangement was attached to the resectoscope (below, left). For CASMS, an alternative

sterilisable IRED probe was designed (below, centre).

Finally, the system needs to know when the surgeon is cutting or coagulating. Two switches have

been connected to the diathermy pedals and to an A/D board in the PC (below, right). The pedal is

placed in a sealed plastic bag in the OR.



GR/ L80577: Review report, April 2001

3

The GUI (below, left) has been kept simple and the different views (3D, 2D, thumbnails) can be turned



on/ off as required by the surgeon. The graphical computer model (below, centre) was obtained by

measuring hard casts of the Limbs & Things phantom used for conventional urological surgery training

(below, right), and using software to build NURBS surfaces from the measured points.

It was found that the Limbs & Things phantom moved and deformed whilst being resected, due to

forces exerted by the resectoscope, release of internal forces and to absorption of irrigant. This was

taken into account by: a) pre-calculating deformations and selecting appropriate control points for the

NURBS surfaces (below, left and centre), b) partially constraining the motion with a set of Perspex

profiles (below, right), and c) using ultrasound for tracking motion, with an optically tracked

ultrasound probe (below, right).

Since the Limbs & Things phantom is opaque to ultrasound, alternative phantoms, made of gelatine

and an ultrasound scatterer, were developed. The first prototype (below, left) was based on a resection

shape from anatomical diagrams. The second prototype (formers and moulds below, centre and right),

based on the Limbs & Things phantom, includes anatomical features, thus allowing a laboratory-based

assessment of the in vivo system, more closely mimicking the actual operation.



GR/ L80577: Review report, April 2001

4

The gelatine phantoms were used to form ultrasound images with



clearly visible capsule and urethra (right). Automatic segmentation

of this quality image is feasible.

Transrectal ultrasound images of a patient’s prostate are much

more difficult to analyse automatically, as they depict artefacts due

to the shadow created by the resectoscope (below, left), and by the

diathermy current when cutting (below, centre) and coagulating

(below, right).

In CASMS (left), the surgeon acquires

a set of 2D pre-operative transrectal

ultrasound scans of the patient’s

prostate, using an optically tracked

ultrasound probe. The scans are then

manually segmented by the urologist

who delineates the areas to be

resected. A 3D model is automatically

built and rendered in a computer

display (right).

During the TURP, the display shows the current status of the resection by superimposing a rendering of

the resectoscope onto the patient’s prostate model. The resected cavity is also rendered. Per-operative

ultrasound, with a tracked and motorised probe, is used to detect and compensate for the movement of

the prostate.

Following Ethics Committee approval, mock-up of the tools were tried in the OR during TURP

(below, left). The optical tracker was suspended from the ceiling of the OR, on a counterbalanced arm

(below, top right). Tests of visibility of the IRED tools in the OR were successful (below, bottom

right).

5. Main findings/ key advances



Integration of training in the OR  Although there are many systems available for training surgeons in

the skills of minimal access surgery, there is still a large gap between such systems and the real surgical



GR/ L80577: Review report, April 2001

5

procedure. The dual system CASTS/CASMS reduces this gap by providing assistance during both in



vitro training, and the in vivo procedure.

Realism  There are several approaches to computer-assisted training systems involving one or a

combination of computer graphics and VR, haptic feedback, and finite element modelling. However,

even the most advanced haptic systems are seen by some as not giving the same feel as cutting through

real human tissue. The use of physical phantoms in CASTS is more realistic and provides a natural

progression from traditional training.

Measurable performance  CASTS/ CASMS provide objective data to enable the measurement of

performance and improvement, such as the amount of tissue resected, perforation or damage to high-

risk areas, and the time taken to complete the procedure.

Role of CASTS  The system can be used as an extra cue for endoscopic navigation, as a “black box”

for logging the session, or as the basis of a VR system.



Role of CASMS  The system can be used as an extra cue for endoscopic navigation, as a “black box”

for logging the surgical procedure, or as a pre-operative planner.



Streamlined information  Whilst operating conventionally, the surgeon views the endoscopic camera

display, and uses both hands to operate the resectoscope and ancillary equipment, as well as one foot to

activate the diathermy unit. In CASTS/ CASMS, extra intervention or information has therefore been

kept simple and to a minimum to avoid changing the procedure.



Changes to procedure  As far as possible, the trainer/ monitor does not change the TURP procedure.

Real surgical equipment is used. The weight of the instrumentation used to track the resectoscope was

kept to a minimum.

Prostate phantoms  The hygroscopic behaviour from the Limbs & Things prostate phantom causes

great difficulty in the modelling of the procedure. Alternative phantoms were developed which have

overcome this problem.

Deformation and movement  The prostate phantom (and the prostate) moves and deforms in

unexpected modes. This was tackled by introducing partial constraints and precalculated deformations

(in CASTS), and by using per-operative ultrasound (in CASMS).

Pre-operative and per-operative ultrasound  A transducer, small and powerful enough to fit around

the resectoscope’s sheath, would avoid the need for transrectal ultrasound and simplify the procedure.



Accuracy and timeliness  The information provided has to be accurate and up-to-date. Simple

strategies for this were adopted: models that can be rendered quickly, precalculated deformations,

partial constraining of motion, multi-threaded code.

Tool tracking  A novel IRED probe for tracking the position and orientation of a resectoscope

(EndoTracker) has been developed in collaboration with Traxtal Technologies Ltd, Canada. Its average

error is less than 0.2mm and the probe is visible over 90% of the time, in spite of ±180° axial rotations.

6. Project plan review

The original research proposal stated that “The target [the prostate] would be assumed not to move

significantly intra-operatively so that pre-operative 3D models can be used”. This was found to be only

valid in the previous research context, where all data was in the same coordinate system. The need for

tracking motion and deformation of the prostate (and the prostate phantoms) in external (world)

coordinates was successfully tackled and accommodated within the project plan.

Two unforeseen factors slowed down the progress of the OR trials. Our main surgical collaborator

needed back surgery which forced him to be away from the operating table for several months,

impeding the trial of the integrated CASMS, scheduled for January-February 2001. Also, the

development of EndoTracker, in collaboration with Traxtal Technologies Ltd, was severely delayed

due to a shortage of ceramic IREDs.

7. Research impact and benefits to society

Patients, Surgeons, Health Providers, and the NHS benefit from improved training and performance.

Surgeon Training Establishments benefit from improved training, assessment and computer-based

certification.

Medical Instrumentation Industry benefits from improved trainers and trackable surgical tools.

The Research Community benefits from computer-assisted training, generic tracking of tools,

construction and tracking of ultrasound phantoms, modelling and segmentation of ultrasound images.

8. Dissemination

11 papers (all refereed, 3 journal publications) were written and presented to scientific and medical

international audiences. A poster was presented at EPSRC’s Theme Day in Machine Vision and Image



GR/ L80577: Review report, April 2001

6

Processing, on 7



th

 June 2000. Summaries of the papers and other information on the project are

available on the web (http://www.me.ic.ac.uk/case/mim/). Links to and from our main surgical

collaborators at the Bristol Urological Institute have been established (http://www.bui.ac.uk). Project

posters are also displayed in the Mechatronics in Medicine Laboratory of  Imperial College and are

used to present the project to visitors. A4 copies of the posters have been sent to all collaborators. All

collaborators were sent progress reports throughout the project.

9. Further research

Industrial collaboration to develop commercial products is under investigation.

The test of the integrated CASMS will be finished when the surgeon is fully recovered.

Results on phantoms and models, soft tissue modelling, and motion tracking with ultrasound have

direct relevance to the project at Imperial College on Robotic Systems for a Range of Urological

Disorders (EPSRC grant GR/M53394/01), and also to the project on Innovative Haptics for Risk

Mediation in VR Arthroscopic Training, jointly with Sheffield and Warwick Universities (EPSRC

grant GR/N25459).

A PhD project, carried out by Mr. A.R.W. Barrett, entitled An Investigation into Monitoring

Minimally Invasive Surgery has been underway since September 1998.

Know-how in optical tracking is of general importance in the activities of MIMLab, and it has a

special synergy with the Acrobot project for Robotic Knee Surgery.

10. List of publications

M. P. S. F. Gomes, A. R. W. Barrett, and B. L. Davies, “Computer-assisted soft-tissue surgery training

and monitoring”, MICCAI 2001, Utrecht, The Netherlands, Springer, 2001. Submitted

M. P. S. F. Gomes, P. V. S. Kumar, A. G. Timoney, and B. L. Davies, “Tool tracking for endoscopic

surgery”, Measurement+Control, 2001. To appear.

P. V. S. Kumar, M. P. S. F. Gomes, B. L. Davies, and A. G. Timoney, “A computer-assisted surgical

trainer for transurethral resection of the prostate”, Journal of Urology, 2001. Submitted

M. P. S. F. Gomes and B. L. Davies, “Computer-assisted surgical training for TURP”, First IFAC

Conference on Mechatronic Systems, Darmstadt, Germany, VDI/ VDE - GMA, vol.2, pp. 531-535,

2000.

M. P. S. F. Gomes and B. L. Davies, “Computer-assisted TURP training and monitoring”, MICCAI



2000, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, Springer, pp. 669-677, 2000.

P. V. S. Kumar, M. P. S. F. Gomes, B. L. Davies, and A. G. Timoney, “Computer-assisted surgical

training system for transurethral resection of the prostate”, American Urology Association 95

th

 Annual



Meeting, Atlanta, USA, J. Urol, vol.163:4 Suppl 1476A, pp. 333, 2000.

P. V. S. Kumar, M. P. S. F. Gomes, B. L. Davies, and A. G. Timoney, “Computer-assisted surgical

training system for TURP”, British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) Annual Meeting,

Birmingham, BJU Intl, vol.85: Suppl 5 63A, pp. 27, 2000.

B. Davies, M. P. S. F. Gomes, A. G. Timoney, and P. V. S. Kumar, “A computer-assisted surgical

trainer for transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP)”, International Workshop on Mechatronic

Tools for Surgery (MTS), Rome, pp. 24, 1999.

M. P. S. F. Gomes, A. R. W. Barrett, A. G. Timoney, and B. L. Davies, “A computer-assisted training/

monitoring system for TURP - Structure and design”, IEEE Transactions on Information Technology

in Biomedicine, vol. 3:4, pp. 242-251, 1999.

M. P. S. F. Gomes, P. V. S. Kumar, A. G. Timoney, and B. L. Davies, “A computer-assisted surgical

trainer for TURP - Instrumenting the tools”, Second EUREL (European Advanced Robotic Systems

Development) Workshop, Pisa, Italy, pp. 124-126, 1999.

P. V. S. Kumar, M. P. S. F. Gomes, B. L. Davies, and A. G. Timoney, “Transurethral resection of the

prostate - A computer-assisted training system”, 17



th

 World Congress on Endourology, Rhodes, J.



Endourol, vol.13: Suppl 1 BRS5-12, pp. 19A, 1999.



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə