This country report is prepared as a contribution to the fao publication, The



Yüklə 1.54 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/8
tarix15.08.2017
ölçüsü1.54 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

ETHIOPIA 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



This country report is prepared as a contribution to the FAO publication, The 

Report on the State of the World’s Forest Genetic Resources. The content and the 

structure are in accordance with the recommendations and guidelines given by 

FAO in the document Guidelines for Preparation of Country Reports for the State 

of the World’s Forest Genetic Resources (2010).   These guidelines set out 

recommendations for the objective, scope and structure of the country reports. 

Countries were requested to consider the current state of knowledge of forest 

genetic diversity, including: 

 

Between and within species diversity 



 

List of priority species; their roles and values and importance 



 

List of threatened/endangered species 



 

Threats, opportunities and challenges for the conservation, use and 



development of forest genetic resources 

 These reports were submitted to FAO as official government documents. The 

report  is presented on www. fao.org/documents  as supportive and contextual 

information to be used in conjunction with other documentation on world forest 

genetic resources. 

  

The content and the views expressed in this report are the responsibility of the 



entity submitting the report to FAO. FAO may not be held responsible for the use 

which may be made of the information contained in this report. 



IBC 

THE STATE OF FOREST GENETIC RESOURCES OF ETHIOPIA 

 

 

 

 

INSTITUTE OF BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION (IBC) 



COUNTRY REPORT SUBMITTED TO FAO ON THE STATE OF FOREST GENETIC 

RESOURCES OF ETHIOPIA 

AUGUST 2012  

 

ADDIS ABABA 

 

                                                                                                             



 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



© Institute of Biodiversity Conservation (IBC) 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

    Page 



ACRONYMS .................................................................................................................................. 4 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................ 5 

INTRODUCTION TO THE COUNTRY AND FOREST SECTOR ............................................. 7 

CHAPTER 1: THE CURRENT STATE OF THE FOREST GENETIC RESOURCES 

DIVERSITY ................................................................................................................................... 9 

1.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 9 

1.2 Types of forest genetic resources ........................................................................................ 10 

1.3 Diversity within and between forest tree species ................................................................ 17 

1.4 The role of forest genetic resources .................................................................................... 18 

1.5 Factors influencing the state of forest genetic diversity ...................................................... 18 

1.6 The state of current and emerging technologies .................................................................. 18 

1.7 Future needs and priorities .................................................................................................. 19 

CHAPTER 2: THE STATE OF IN SITU GENETIC CONSERVATION................................... 19 

2.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 19 

2.2 Forest genetic resources inventories and surveys ............................................................... 20 

2.3 Conservation of FGRs within and outside protected areas ................................................. 20 

2.4 Sustainable management of FGRs within and outside protected areas ............................... 22 

2.5 Criteria for in situ genetic conservation site identification ................................................. 23 

2.6 Use and Transfer of Germplasm ......................................................................................... 23 

2.7 Challenges and opportunities .............................................................................................. 23 

CHAPTER 3: THE STATE OF EX SITU GENETIC CONSERVATION ................................. 24 

3.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 24 

3.2 Ex situ Conservation in the Gene Bank and Storage Facilities ........................................... 24 

3.3 Ex situ conservation in the field .......................................................................................... 28 

3.4 Challenges and opportunities .............................................................................................. 28 

3.5 Research needs and priorities .............................................................................................. 29 

CHAPTER 4: THE STATE OF USE AND SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF FGRS ...... 29 

4.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 29 

4.2 Utilization of conserved forest genetic resources and major constraints to their use ......... 29 

4.3 The state of use and management of forest reproductive materials, availability, demand and 

supply ........................................................................................................................................ 30 

4.4 The state of forest genetic improvement and breeding programs ....................................... 31 

4.5 The state of current and emerging technologies .................................................................. 35 

4.6 Assessment of needs to improve the forest genetic resources management and use .......... 35 

CHAPTER 5: THE STATE OF NATIONAL PROGRAMS, RESEARCH, EDUCATION, 

TRAINING AND LEGISLATION .............................................................................................. 37 

5.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 37 

5.2 National programs and strategies ........................................................................................ 40 

5.3 Research and dissemination ................................................................................................ 45 

5.4 Education and training ........................................................................................................ 46 

5.5 Coordination mechanisms and networking ......................................................................... 46 

5.6 Assessment of major needs in capacity building ................................................................ 47 

CHAPTER 6: THE STATE OF REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION  48 

6.1 Regional, Sub-regional and International Networks ........................................................... 48 



 

6.2 International Agreements .................................................................................................... 49 



CHAPTER 7: ACCESS TO FOREST GENETIC RESOURCES AND SHARING OF 

BENEFITS ARISING FROM THEIR USE ................................................................................. 50 

7.1 Policies, regulations and legislations .................................................................................. 50 

7.2 Access and Movement of Forest Germplasms .................................................................... 51 

7.3 Access and Benefit sharing ................................................................................................. 52 

7.4 Stakeholders Involved in Genetic Resource Transfer/Movement and Their Roles ............ 52 

CHAPTER 8: THE CONTRIBUTION OF FOREST GENETIC RESOURCES TO FOOD 

SECURITY, POVERTY ALLEVIATION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT .............. 53 

8.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 53 

8.2 Role in Agricultural sustainability ...................................................................................... 54 

8.3 Food security and poverty alleviation ................................................................................. 54 

8.4 Cultural services .................................................................................................................. 56 

References ..................................................................................................................................... 57 

Appendices .................................................................................................................................... 58 



 

ACRONYMS 

ABS   

Accesses and Benefit Sharing  



CDM   

Clean Development Mechanism 

CRGE  

Climate Resilient Green Economy  



CSA    

Central Statistical Agency 

EIAR   

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research 



EPACC  

Ethiopia’s Program of Adaptation to Climate Change 

FGR   

Forest Genetic Resource  



FRA   

Forest Resources Assessment  

FRC   

Forestry Research Center  



GIZ 

 

German International Cooperation 



GTP   

Growth and Transformation Plan 

GTZ   

German Technical Cooperation 



IBC 

 

Institute of Biodiversity Conservation 



INBAR 

International Network on Bamboo and Rattan 

IUCN   

International Union for Conservation of Nature  



JICA   

Japan International Cooperation Agency 

MTA   

Material Transfer Agreement 



MERET 

Managing Environmental Resources to Enable Transition 

NAMA 

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action 



NAPA  

National Adaptation Program of Action  

NBSAP 

National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan 



NGO   

Non Governmental Organization 

NTFP   

Non Timber Forest Product 



NWFP  

Non Wood Forest Product 

PIC 

 

Prior Informed Consent 



PFM   

Participatory Forest Management  

REDD  

Reduction of Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation  



SLMP   

Sustainable Land Management Program 

SNNP   

South Nations, Nationalities and Peoples 



SUPFM  

Scaling-up Participatory Forest Management Project 

WBISPP  

Woody Biomass Inventory and Strategic Planning 

WGCFNR 

Wondo Genet College of Forestry and Natural Resources 



 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

Ethiopia is located between 3º and 15º N and 33º and 48º E, and has an area of 1,113,677 km

2



The  majority  (83%)  of  the  people,  out  of  the  estimated  84.3  million  total  population  size,  are 

rural.    The  per  capita  GDP  stands  at  392  USD  in  2010/11,  and  the  share  of  agriculture  to  the 

GDP  in  the  same  year  accounted  46%,  whereas  the  rest  was  contributed  by  the  service  sector 

(43.5%) and the industry (10.5%).  

 

Ethiopia  has  11%  forest  cover,  which  has  showed  a  great  leap  from  widely  known  figure  of 



3.65%  owing  to  the  accounting  of  high  woodland  areas  into  forest  areas  during  the  forest 

resources  assessment  (FRA)  report  preparation  in  2010.  Forest  trees  and  shrubs  are  the  major 

suppliers  of  energy  and  wood  based  products  of  national  consumption  in  Ethiopia.  Articles  of 

wood and wooden furniture, bamboo, Khat (leaves of Catha edulis), forest coffee, natural gums 

and  resin  and  charcoal  have  been  some  of  the  export  commodities  of  the  country  in  the  last 

decade.  

 

Ethiopia  hosts  the  Eastern  Afromontane  and  the  Horn  of  Africa  hotspots  of  biodiversity,  and 



owns  an  estimated  6000  species  of  higher  plants.  Woody  plants  constitute  about  1000  species, 

out of which 300 are trees. Hence, conservation of forest genetic resources is one of the priority 

areas of biodiversity conservation in Ethiopia.  A number of in situ and ex situ conservation sites, 

including the forest gene bank in Addis Ababa, have been established targeting conservation and 

sustainable use of important  tree and shrub species  such as natural  forest coffee populations  of 

Ethiopia.  In  addition,  the  development  of  forest  genetic  resources  conservation  strategy  and 

studies conducted on diversity, structure and socioeconomics conditions in Afromontane forests 

in southwestern, eastern and northern parts of the country were instrumental in identifying the in 



situ conservation sites. Notable examples of in situ conservation sites in Ethiopia include nature 

reserves  (Yayu  Coffee  Forest  Biosphere  Reserve,  Kafa  Biosphere  Reserve  and  Sheka  Forest 

Biosphere Reserve), national/regional parks, forest  in situ stands for various tree species, forest 

areas  managed  under  participatory  forest  management,  National  Forest  Priority  Areas  (NFPA), 

area exclosures, church forests, sacred forests and community forests.  Efforts with implications 

on  forest  genetic  resources  conservation  and  sustainable  utilization  in  Ethiopia  include 

development  of  Climate  Resilient  Green  Economy  (CRGE)  strategy  and  other  development 

plans such as the Plan for Accelerated and Sustainable Development to End Poverty (PASDEP) 

and  Growth  and  Transformation  Plan  (GTP),  the  Conservation  Strategy  of  Ethiopia,  the 

Environmental Policy of Ethiopia, the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP) 

the  Forest  Development,  Conservation  and  Utilization  Proclamation  and  the  Proclamation  on 

Access to Genetic Resources and Community Knowledge, and Community Rights. 

 

The Institute of Biodiversity Conservation (IBC) is the lead government institution mandated for 



conservation of plant, animal and microbial genetic resources in Ethiopia. Currently some of the 

31  public  universities  and  all  the  eight  federal  and  regional  agricultural  research  institutes  are 

engaged  in  forest  genetic  resources  utilization, management  and  conservation  related  programs 

and activities. Furthermore, a number of networks are currently addressing one or more aspects 

of forest genetic resources conservation and management. In the past ten years, few agreements 


 

have  been  ratified  internationally,  and  Ethiopia  has  recently  ratified  the  Nagoya  Protocol  on 



Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS).    

 

The  major  factors  influencing  the  state  of  forest  genetic  diversity  of  native  tree  species  in 



Ethiopia  are  deforestation  and  forest  fragmentation,  taking  over  of  habitats  by  invasive  species 

such  as  Prosopis  juliflora,  expansion  of  exotic  plantations  and  forest  fire.  The  noticeable 

conflicts of interest and lack of integration among sectoral activities are severely affecting forest 

conservation  and  utilization  measures.  Other  factors  with  adverse  effect  on  conservation  and 

sustainable  management  of  forest  genetic  resources  include  fire  hazards,  illegal  logging  and 

encroachment, pest and disease infestations. Weak institutional capacity and lack of coordination 

among  actors  in  the  forest  sector  are  also  hampering  effective  and  long  term  conservation  of 

forest  genetic  resources.  Failure  to  take  proactive  measures  for  improving  the  status  of  forest 

genetic  resources  may  lead  to  further  deterioration  of  the  resource,  which  would  mean  loss  of 

multiple environmental, social and economic benefits and potentials. 

 

The following strategic directions are proposed for overcoming the challenges and addressing the 



identified  issues  in  conservation  and  management  of  forest  genetic  resources  of  Ethiopia:  (1) 

Strengthening the tree seed production-supply system for satisfying needs for quality seeds and 

collection and conservation of germplasm, (2) Creating policy alignment among various sectors 

and  improving  the  integration  of  the  conservation  and  sustainable  use  of  forest  resources  into 

relevant  sectoral  or  cross-sectoral  plans  and  programs,  (3)  Improving  the  effectiveness  of 

regulations that are important for the conservation of forest  genetic resources  within  or outside 

protected areas, (4) Promoting the protection of ecosystems, natural habitats and the maintenance 

of  viable  populations  of  species  in  natural  surroundings,  (5)  Rehabilitating  and  restoring 

degraded  ecosystems  and  promoting  the  recovery  of  threatened  species,  (6)  Ensuring  benefit-

sharing  mechanisms  and  empowerment  of  local  community  to  manage  and  conserve  forest 

genetic  resources,  (7)  Regulating  the  introduction  of,  and  controlling  or  eradicating  invasive 

species which threaten ecosystems, habitats or species, (8) Strengthening forestry education and 

training,  (9)  Capacitating  the  responsible  institutions  for  forest  genetic  resources  conservation 

and  management  with  human,  technical,  material  and  financial  resources,  (10)  Promoting  new 

techniques  and  technologies  for  forest  genetic  resources  assessment,  understanding  the  state  of 

diversity  and  multiplication  and  conservation  and  (11)  Putting  in  place  pragmatic  and  targeted 

forest genetic resources information monitoring and evaluation systems 


 

INTRODUCTION TO THE COUNTRY AND FOREST SECTOR 

Physiogeographic and climatic features  

Ethiopia  is  located  in  the  tropics  in  the  Horn  of  Africa  between  3º  and  15º  N,  33º  and  48º 

E,longi

t

ude and covers a land surface area of 1,113,677km



2

. The country has great topographical 

diversity with flat-topped plateaus, high mountains, river valleys, deep gorges, rolling plains, and 

with great variation of altitude from 116 meters below sea level in some areas of Kobar Sink, to 

4620  meters  above  sea  level  at  Ras  Dashen.  The  Great  Rift  Valley  runs  from  northeast  to 

southwest  of the country and separates the western and south-eastern highlands. The highlands 

on  each  side  of  the  rift  valley  give  way  to  extensive  semi-arid  lowlands  to  the  east,  south  and 

west of the country.  

 

Ethiopia is a tropical country with varied macro and micro-climatic conditions.  The influence of 



high  altitudes  modifies  mean  temperatures  and  leads  to  a  more  moderate  Mediterranean  type 

climate  in  the  highlands.  The  country  is  broadly  divided  into  three  major  climatic  zones:  Cool 

highlands  (>  2300  masl.);  temperate  highlands  (1500-2300  masl.)  and  hot  lowlands  (<1500 

masl.)  The  rainfall  distribution  is  seasonal  and  governed  by  the  inter-annual  oscillation  of  the 

surface position of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) that passes over Ethiopia twice 

in a year.  Mean annual rainfall patterns range from below 200 mm to above 2 800 mm. with the 

the  South  western  region  receiving    the  heaviest  annual  rainfall  that  goes  above  2800  mm  in 

some  areas.  The  central  and  northern  central  regions  receive  moderate  rainfall  that  declines 

towards northeast and eastern Ethiopia. The southeastern and northern regions receive an annual 

rainfall of about 700 mm and 500 mm, respectively.  

 

Population and socio-economic conditions  



Ethiopia’s  population  is  estimated  at  84.3  million  with  a  density  of  114  persons  per  square 

kilometer. About 83% of the people dwell in rural areas, and are mainly engaged in agriculture 

(CSA, 2012).  The majority of the rural population in the mid highlands and highlands are small 

holder  farmers  and  those  in  the  lowlands  are  pastoralists  and  agropastoralists.  The  majority 

(82.5%) of the farmers, excluding pastoralist inhabited areas, own less than 2 ha of land. The per 

capita GDP (nominal) has improved from 123 in 2002 to 392 USD in 2011 (CSA, 2012).  

 

Land cover types and forest resources  



The  major  land  cover  types  in  Ethiopia  are  rain  fed  cultivation,  woodlands  and  scrublands 

(Figure 1). However, as  of the forest  resources assessment report preparation in  2010, the high 

woodlands have been categorized as forests, and hence the forest cover has showed a leap jump 

from  the  usually  cited  3.65%  (WBISPP,  2004)  to  11%.  Ethiopia  currently  has  12.3  mill.ha  of 

forests (comprising forests, planted forests, woodland areas) and 44.6 million ha of other wooded 

grasslands  (Table  1).  Out  of  the  forests,  planted  forests  constitute  over  972  000



Каталог: contents -> 8d7d3d11-4150-4fd5-a71a-c1306eaea4da
contents -> YeniDOĞan sariliğI Önemi  Hastaneye yeniden yatışların en sık sebebi → ilk 2 hft
contents -> T. C. DİCle üNİversitesi beden eğİTİMİ ve spor yüKSEKOKULU beden eğİTİMİ ve spor öĞretmenliĞİ BÖLÜMÜ ders biLGİ paketi
contents -> Hastaliklari
contents -> Dİcle üNİversitesi tip faküLtesi DÖnem II hastaliklarin biyolojik temelleri-vii ders kurulu farmakoloji anabiLİm dali ders biLGİ paketi
contents -> Hemostaz slayt 2 Hemostaz
contents -> Topografya Insaat Mühendisligi M. Zeki Coskun
contents -> Aort stenozu
contents -> Aort stenozu
8d7d3d11-4150-4fd5-a71a-c1306eaea4da -> Ce rapport a été préparé pour contribuer à la publication fao: Etat des
8d7d3d11-4150-4fd5-a71a-c1306eaea4da -> Este informe del país se ha preparado como contribución al informe de la fao


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə