T 4 Report In Vitro



Yüklə 477.65 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/5
tarix26.02.2017
ölçüsü477.65 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5

Altex 30, 3/13

353


t

4

 Report*

In Vitro Testicular Toxicity Models: 

Opportunities for Advancement  

via Biomedical Engineering Techniques 

Louise Parks Saldutti

 1

, Bruce K. Beyer

 2

, William Breslin

 3

, Terry R. Brown

 4

, Robert E. Chapin

 5

,  

Sarah Campion

 5

, Brian Enright

 6

, Elaine Faustman

 7

, Paul M. D. Foster

 8

, Thomas Hartung

 9

,  

William Kelce

 10

, James H. Kim

 11

, Elizabeth G. Loboa

 12

, Aldert H. Piersma

 13

, David Seyler

 14

,  

Katie J. Turner

 15

, Hanry Yu

 16

, Xiaozhong Yu

 17

, and Jennifer C. Sasaki

 18

1

Department of Development & Reproduction, Merck & Co., West Point, PA, USA; 



2

Department of Disposition, Safety 

and Animal Research – Preclinical Safety, Sanofi U.S. Inc., Bridgewater, NJ, USA; 

3

eli lilly and Company, lilly Research 



Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 

4

Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of 



Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 

5

Pfizer Inc., Global R&D, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Group, Groton, 



Ct, USA; 

6

AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA; 



7

University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational 

Health Sciences, Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA, USA; 

8

National Toxicology Program, 



National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 

Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 

9

Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Alternatives 



to Animal Testing, Baltimore, MD, USA, and University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany; 

10

Leading Edge PharmTox LLC, 



Durham, NC, USA; 

11

ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, Washington, DC, USA; 



12

Loboa: UNC-Chapel 

Hill and NC State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 

13

Center for Health Protection, RIVM, Bilthoven, The Netherlands and 



Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 

14

eli lilly and Company, lilly 



Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 

15

Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 



16

Physiology 

& Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore; Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, A*STAR, 

Singapore; Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; 

17

University of Washington, 



current affiliation Department of Environmental Health Science, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 

USA; 


18

AstraZeneca, Global Safety Assessment, Waltham, MA, USA



Summary

To address the pressing need for better in vitro testicular toxicity models, a workshop sponsored by the 

International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), the Health and Environmental Science Institute (HESI), and 

the Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT), was held at the Mt. Washington 

Conference Center in Baltimore, MD, USA on October 26-27, 2011. At this workshop, experts in testis 

physiology, toxicology, and tissue engineering discussed approaches for creating improved in vitro 

environments that would be more conducive to maintaining spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis and could 

provide more predictive models for testicular toxicity testing. This workshop report is intended to provide 

*

 a report of t



4

 – the transatlantic think tank for toxicology, a collaboration of the toxicologically oriented chairs in Baltimore, Konstanz, 

and Utrecht, sponsored by the Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation. The opinions expressed in this report are those of the participants as 

individuals and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the organizations they are affiliated with; participants do not necessarily endorse 

all recommendations made.

Abbreviations: FDA, Food and Drug Administration; FSH, follicle stimulating hormone; GnRH, gonadotropin-releasing hormone; HPG, 

hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal; LH, luteinizing hormone; OECD, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development; REACH, 

Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals


S

aldutti


 

et

 



al

.

Altex 30, 3/13



354

tive toxicity and carcinogenicity, with heavy reliance on animal 

data. While this approach is effective for evaluation of chemi-

cal and pharmaceutical safety, it is costly, time-consuming, and 

requires large numbers of experimental animals. In response, 

methods varying in complexity from in silico prediction tools 

and biochemical assays to cell/organ culture methods can offer 

cost-effective and time-saving alternative approaches to in vivo 

testing. However, their implementation in hazard and risk as-

sessment paradigms, replacing or reducing animal studies, has 

lagged behind due to uncertainties as to the predictive capacity 

of these reductionist methods. Furthermore, their “applicabil-

ity domain” – in view of the biological space covered and the 

chemical classes for which they are predictive – has been a sub-

ject of continuous debate. 

Since the landmark publication by Russell and Burch (1959), 

the 3R paradigm of Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement of 

animal experimentation has been a leading theme in the devel-

opment of alternative methods. For complex biological systems 

such as the reproductive system, it has been recognized that 1:1 

replacement of an in vivo animal study by animal-free methods 

is unlikely. However, combinations of alternative tests in a tiered 

and/or battery approach may provide improved toxicity predic-

tion. This approach was tested in the European ReProTect col-

laboration (Hareng et al., 2005) in which ten carefully-selected 

compounds were tested in ten assays covering different aspects 

of the reproductive cycle (Schenk et al., 2010). This pilot study 

showed that a combination of complementary assays could im-

prove prediction as compared to single assays. In the US, the 

ongoing ToxCast project at the US Environmental Protection 

Agency (EPA) (Dix et al., 2011; Knudsen et al., 2011) repre-

sents a large-scale investment towards integrated in vitro toxic-

ity  assessment,  in  which  hundreds  of  high  throughput  assays 

have been aligned to characterize toxicity profiles of chemicals. 

Complementary to this, the Human Toxome Project

1

 has started 



mapping pathways of toxicity (Hartung and McBride, 2011) us-

ing endocrine disruption as a test case.

Reduction of animal use may be achieved by optimizing ani-

mal studies and their alignment in a testing strategy, together 

with alternative methods as prescreening tools. For instance, the 

recently approved extended one-generation reproductive toxic-

ity study protocol (OECD TG 443), when replacing the OECD 

TG 416 two-generation reproductive toxicity study, could reduce 



1  Introduction

1.1  Overview of the workshop

This workshop on in vitro testicular toxicity models was con-

ceived by Bob Chapin (Pfizer) and organized by James Kim 

(ILSI/HESI),  Jennifer  Sasaki  (AstraZeneca),  and  Louise 

Saldutti (Merck). An opening statement was delivered by Tho-

mas  Hartung  (CAAT),  followed  by Aldert  Piersma  (RIVM), 

who provided an overview of European activities regarding in 

vitro  male  reproductive  toxicity  efforts. Terry  Brown  (Johns 

Hopkins School of Public Health) and Paul Cooke (University 

of Florida) presented overviews of male reproductive physiol-

ogy, spermatogenesis, and steroidogenesis. Paul Foster (NTP) 

discussed several paradigm testicular toxicants and noted the 

variety of mechanisms by which testicular toxicity is induced 

and where in vitro approaches have added value to our under-

standing.  Mary  Hixon  (Brown  University),  Elaine  Faustman 

(University of Washington), and Sarah Campion (Pfizer) pro-

vided perspectives on past and present in vitro testicular toxicity 

models. Tessa DesRochers (Tufts University), Elizabeth Loboa 

(University  of  North  Carolina  at  Chapel  Hill/North  Carolina 

State University), and Hanry Yu (National University of Singa-

pore) provided biomedical engineering perspectives, discuss-

ing advances in the areas of kidney, bone, and liver tissue engi-

neering, respectively. David O’Dowd (Draper Lab, Cambridge, 

MA) presented examples of applications of biomedical engi-

neering approaches in industry. Following the technical presen-

tations, William Kelce (Novan Therapeutics, Durham, NC) led 

interactive discussions between the speakers and the audience 

that  elicited  lively  discussion  among  academic,  government, 

and industrial participants. In closing, Elizabeth Maull (NIH/

NIEHS), Suzanne Fitzpatrick (FDA), and Meta Bonner (EPA) 

discussed  available  funding  opportunities  that  could  support 

future research in this area.

1.2  Historical aspects of in vivo safety evaluation

Global agreement on hazard and risk assessment of chemicals 

and pharmaceuticals has been pursued by harmonizing Organi-

sation  for  Economic  Cooperation  and  Development  (OECD) 

and  International  Conference  on  Harmonisation  (ICH)  proto-

cols and testing approaches. Test guidelines address the range 

of endpoints such as systemic, developmental, and reproduc-

scientists with a broad overview of relevant testicular toxicity literature and to suggest opportunities 

where bioengineering principles and techniques could be used to build improved in vitro testicular models 

for safety evaluation. Tissue engineering techniques could, conceivably, be immediately implemented to 

improve existing models. However, it is likely that in vitro testis models that use single or multiple cell types 

will be needed to address such endpoints as accurate prediction of chemically induced testicular toxicity 

in humans, elucidation of mechanisms of toxicity, and identification of possible biomarkers of testicular 

toxicity. 

Keywords: testicular toxicity, bioengineering, biomedical engineering, in vitro screening

1

 http://humantoxome.com



S

aldutti


 

et

 



al

.

Altex 30, 3/13



355

within a 48-well tissue culture plate) to be useful in routine tox-

icity screening or mechanism of action assessment. However, 

were such platforms available, they would be immediately ap-

plicable in pharmaceutical discovery and development, as in 

the case where a lead compound produces testis damage. The 

screening assay could be used to assess the toxicity of possible 

backup  compounds. Additional  applications  include  elucida-

tion of the mechanisms of toxicity and/or identifying biomark-

ers for nonclinical and clinical use. Such assays also could be 

of great value for initial first-tier screening of environmental 

compounds, where the number of chemicals with unknown bio-

logical activity is vastly larger than the resources to test them in 

animals. For example, based on the Toxic Substances Control 

Act (TSCA, 1976) there are more than 75,000 chemicals in use 

in the United States that ultimately make it into the environ-

ment. Most of these chemicals have limited or no toxicologi-

cal evaluation. For such a large number of compounds, toxic-

ity characterization via current approaches that rely heavily on 

animal testing would cost millions of dollars and take several 

years per compound. Several initiatives are tackling these is-

sues, including the ILSI/HESI tier-based approach for toxicity 

screening  and  testing  prioritization  of  agricultural  chemicals 

(Barton et al., 2006; Carmichael et al., 2006), while others aim 

to characterize toxicity solely via in vitro models, such as the 

NRC initiative for developing in vitro approaches to chemical 

toxicity characterization (NRC, 2007). In the EU in 1981 there 

were an estimated 100,000 chemicals on the market. For most 

of these chemicals there are limited or no risk assessment data, 

and the lack of data on high volume chemicals (>1,000 tons per 

year) is of particular concern

2

. In 2007 in the European Union 



(EU), REACH chemical legislation was established to consoli-

date regulations on new and existing chemicals to define a more 

consistent  approach  to  chemical  regulation.  Because  testing 

was now required for new (post-1981) chemicals with produc-

tion volumes ≥10 kg, this new legislation encouraged use of 

existing  chemicals.  Subsequently,  research  and  development 

of new chemicals has been greatly inhibited, with only ~3000 

new chemicals introduced to the market since REACH legisla-

tion was enacted. Even with the reduction in newly introduced 

entities, toxicity characterization is still needed in the EU and 

globally for thousands of marketed chemicals, highlighting the 

need for well-designed in vitro assays that can screen and pri-

oritize chemicals of potentially high safety risk.

Similarly, the pharmaceutical industry has struggled to iden-

tify and implement effective early safety screening approaches 

to offset the rising cost of pharmaceutical development (Scannell 

et al., 2012; McKim, 2010). While testicular toxicity may not 

be the leading contributor to drug candidate attrition, identifica-

tion of testicular lesions in repeat dose Good Laboratory Practice 

(GLP) animal toxicology studies of four weeks or longer in dura-

tion, but not during initial one- or two-week non-GLP dose-range 

finding studies, can incur significant costs, particularly if clinical 

trials already have been initiated (Sasaki et al., 2011). Further-

more, in contrast to safety liabilities such as hepatotoxicity, in 

animal use by 40% compared with OECD TG 416, and overall 

animal  use  in  the  entire  Registration,  Evaluation, Authorisa-

tion and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) legislation by 15% 

(Bremer et al., 2007; Hartung and Rovida, 2009; Piersma et al., 

2011). Attempts also are underway to design innovative testing 

strategies making optimal use of alternatives (van der Burg et 

al., 2011; Hartung et al., 2013).

Refinement of hazard assessment by elucidating mechanisms 

of action is another approach where alternative assays can pro-

vide important additional information to inform interspecies ex-

trapolation and assess the human relevance. the european and 

ToxCast  collaborations  mentioned  above  provide  good  exam-

ples of relevant approaches in this area. In addition, the US Na-

tional Academy of Sciences (NAS) vision on Toxicology in the 

21

st

 Century has generated the concept of a restricted number of 



biological pathways that could be perturbed to result in adverse 

effects (NRC, 2007). The NAS in 2000 (NRC, 2000) identified 

the extraordinary genomic conservation of signaling pathways 

for development and reproductive response pathways and served 

as the basis for identification of potential pathways for toxicity 

assays in in vitro and non-vertebrate assays. The identification of 

these pathways is the current challenge. Their representation in 

alternative assays could provide the basis for an in vitro testing 

strategy. However, it should be realized that the entire organism 

is more than the sum of its parts and, therefore, animal studies 

will remain necessary for the immediate future. 

Awareness of the need to implement alternative methods was 

increased by novel chemical safety legislation in Europe and the 

implementation of REACH (European Commission, 2007). The 

European Chemicals Bureau has published an estimation of pre-

dicted experimental animal use arguing that 65% of test animal 

usage for REACH would be for reproductive and developmental 

toxicity assessment alone (van der Jagt et al., 2004) based on 

counting the pups used in the multigeneration studies. This large 

number of animals turns reproductive and developmental toxicol-

ogy into a high priority area for developing alternative methods.

Several analyses of existing reproductive toxicity study data-

bases have shown that the testis often is among the most sensi-

tive organs to exogenous exposure, driving the determination 

of lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL), which is the 

starting point for risk assessment (Bremer et al., 2007; Dang et 

al., 2009; Martin et al., 2009). Therefore, the testis certainly is 

a priority organ for the development of alternative assays. Al-

though the ultimate goal would be to design in vitro cultures that 

could successfully recreate the key aspects of spermatogenesis 

and steroidogenesis, few of the current mammalian testis cell 

culture methods support or yield mature germ cells (Sato et al., 

2011). 

1.3  Application of in vitro testicular  

toxicity models to environmental chemical  

and pharmaceutical safety testing

To date, no systems produce germ cells in sufficient quantity 

or in consistently repeatable units across assay replicates (e.g., 

2

 http://www.hse.gov.uk/reach/resources/factsheet.pdf



S

aldutti


 

et

 



al

.

Altex 30, 3/13



356

may increase confidence that animal findings will translate to 

humans as compared to other organ systems. Olson et al. (2000) 

identified 150 compounds under pharmaceutical development 

that were known to produce human toxicity in one or more or-

gan system, and then examined the animal toxicology reports 

for these 150 compounds to determine the predictive value of 

the animal data. The true positive concordance rate was 70% 

for one or more preclinical animal model species (including ro-

dent and nonrodent), showing the target organ toxicity that also 

was seen in the same human organ system. For the remaining  

30% of human toxicities, there was no relationship between tox-

icities seen in animals and those observed in humans. Concord-

ance with the human toxicities dropped markedly when only a 

single species demonstrated similar toxicity. Concordance fell 

to 27% when only one nonrodent species demonstrated similar 

toxicity and to 7% when only one rodent species demonstrated 

similar toxicity. 

In  2011,  the  US  Food  &  Drug  Administration  (FDA)  ap-

proved 24 new molecular entities (NME) and 6 biologic license 

applications (BLA). Following review of the product labels and/

or drug approval packages, there were 8 of these approved drugs 

that exhibited evidence of testicular toxicity in at least 1 species, 

with 2 drugs exhibiting findings in 2 species (Tab. 1). Three of 

these  8  drugs  (Daliresp

®

(roflumilast),  Victrelis™(boceprevir) 



and Incivek™(telaprevir)) had dedicated clinical reproductive 

studies that failed to demonstrate detectable human reproduc-

tive toxicity. See Table 1 for an exposure comparison between 

human and nonclinical species. 

During its nonclinical development, Daliresp

®

 produced an 



increased incidence of tubular atrophy, degeneration of the tes-

tis, and sperm granulomas in the epididymides in rats. Daliresp

®

 

also exhibited effects on the male reproductive tract in dogs and 



mice,  but  not  in  hamsters  and  monkeys.  Interestingly,  there 

were no effects of Daliresp

®

 on semen parameters or reproduc-



tive hormones in a 3 month clinical study

3



In nonclinical studies with Victrelis™, drug-exposed rats ex-

hibited decreased fertility due to testicular degeneration. Tes-

ticular findings in the rat were not associated with alterations of 

follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) 

or testosterone, and generally consisted of lower epididymal, 

prostate, and testes weights. In the epididymides, findings in-

cluded luminal cell debris and/or hypospermia, while in the tes-

tes, Sertoli cell vacuolation, depletion and/or degeneration of 

spermatocytes and spermatids, and atrophy of the seminiferous 

tubules were observed; signs of reversibility of these testicular 

toxicity findings were observed following a 2 month treatment-

free period. Testicular toxicity was not observed in immature or 

sexually mature cynomolgus monkeys, dogs, or mice exposed 

to Victrelis™. In addition, clinical monitoring of male subjects 

for surrogate markers of testicular function, which included in-

hibin B and semen analysis, indicated that Victrelis™ exhibited 

no evidence of testicular toxicity in men

4,5


which toxic insult in both animals and humans can be readily 

monitored  via  well-established  endpoints  such  as  increases  in 

blood levels of liver-specific transaminases, attempts to identify 

a sensitive and specific translational marker for testicular injury 

have been largely unsuccessful (Elkin et al., 2010).

With appropriate caveats, it sometimes is possible to predict 

the  adverse  outcomes  of  a  structurally  related  chemical  entity 

based on the in vitro signature that has been constructed for the 

structural class, and that is biologically related to in vivo out-

comes such as specific morphological changes, gene expression 

signatures,  or  hormonal  responses. The  availability  of in  vitro 

predictive  screening  assays  for  testicular  toxicity  would  allow 

drug  discovery  units  to  screen  quickly  for  testicular  liability 

among potential drug candidates using small amounts (mg) of 

compound. As the testicular toxicity of a candidate may be fur-

ther modulated by distribution, metabolism, or excretion charac-

teristics, in silico or in vitro partitioning or transport models may 

be useful, in combination with in vitro testicular toxicity data, to 

assess the dose-response effect of the compound within the ro-

dent and non-rodent species or human male reproductive tract.




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə