Pursuant to Ind. Appellate Rule 65(D), this Memorandum Decision shall not be regarded as precedent or cited before any court except for the purpose of establishing the defense of res judicata, collateral estoppel, or the law of the case



Yüklə 235.28 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix26.07.2017
ölçüsü235.28 Kb.

Pursuant to Ind. Appellate Rule 65(D),  

this  Memorandum  Decision  shall  not 

be  regarded  as  precedent  or  cited 

before  any  court  except  for  the 

purpose  of  establishing  the  defense  of 

res  judicata,  collateral  estoppel,  or the 

law of the case. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

ATTORNEY FOR APPELLANT: 



ATTORNEYS FOR APPELLEE: 

 

PATRICIA CARESS MCMATH 

GREGORY F. ZOELLER 

Marion County Public Defender Agency 

Attorney General of Indiana   

Indianapolis, Indiana 

 

 

 

 

ANDREW FALK 

 

 

 

Deputy Attorney General  



 

 

 



Indianapolis, Indiana

    


 

 

 



 

IN THE 

COURT OF APPEALS OF INDIANA 

 

 



 

ANTHONY SHOCKLEY, 

Appellant-Defendant, 



vs. 



No. 49A02-1212-CR-957 

STATE OF INDIANA



Appellee-Plaintiff. 



  

 



APPEAL FROM THE MARION SUPERIOR COURT 

The Honorable Robert Altice, Judge 

Cause No. 49G02-1106-MR-42263 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

July 23, 2013 



 

 

 

MEMORANDUM DECISION - NOT FOR PUBLICATION 

 

 

 

ROBB, Chief Judge 

 

 



 

 

Jul 23 2013, 6:17 am



 

Case Summary and Issues 



 

 Following a jury trial, Anthony Shockley was convicted of murder, a felony, and 

attempted robbery, a Class C felony.   He now appeals, raising several issues, which we 

restate as follows:  1) whether the trial court properly admitted evidence of Shockley’s 

involvement in a prior shooting; 2) whether the trial court properly excluded evidence of 

statements made by a co-defendant exculpating Shockley; and 3) whether the abstract of 

judgment  should  be  corrected.    Concluding  there  was  no  error  in  the  admission  or 

exclusion  of  evidence,  we  affirm  Shockley’s  convictions,  but  remand  for  the  limited 

purpose of correcting the abstract of judgment. 

Facts and Procedural History 

 

The  facts  most  favorable  to  the  convictions  reveal  that  on  the  night  of  June  4, 



2011,  and  into  the  morning  of  June  5,  Shockley  went  along  with  Jamar  Perkins  and 

Johnathan Williams to an apartment complex named Bavarian Village Apartments so that 

Williams  could  sell  his  cell  phone.    Williams  was  driving  his  grandmother’s  white 

Chevrolet Blazer.  After parking the car, Williams saw a man on the sidewalk.  Perkins 

said, “[l]et’s get him,” transcript at 57, but Williams indicated that he should calm down 

and  went  inside  the  apartment  complex.    As  he  was  half-way  down  the  stairs,  he  heard 

gunshots.    He  observed  Shockley  shooting  one  or  two  bullets  at  the  victim,  Clayton 

Battice.   Battice was a sixty-one  year old  man who lived in the apartment complex and 

was on his way home from work that night.  He died as a result of his gunshot wounds. 


 

 



Shockley  was  charged  with  murder  and,  along  with  Perkins,  felony  murder, 

attempted  robbery,  and  use  of  a  firearm.

1

    Upon  motion  by  the  State,  Shockley  and 



Perkins were tried separately with Shockley being tried first.  Prior to trial, the State filed 

a notice of intent to introduce evidence of a shooting earlier on the night of June 4, 2011, 

at  an  apartment  complex  named  The  Cottages  that  Shockley  was  allegedly  involved  in.  

Over  objection  from  Shockley,  the  trial  court  allowed  admission  of  the  evidence  but 

indicated  that  it did  not “want  to  hear  a  bunch  of stuff about”  it and  requested  that  the 

State prepare a limiting instruction.  See Tr. at 19.  Also prior to trial, Shockley indicated 

that  he  wanted  to  introduce  evidence  of  letters  written  by  Perkins  and  sent  to  the 

prosecutor and to the court, indicating that he and Shockley had traded guns the night of 

the  shootings  and  that  Shockley  was  innocent  of  the  charges  against  him.    The  court 

found the letters to be unreliable and refused to allow the evidence. 

 

After  the  jury  trial,  during  which  Williams  testified  regarding  the  shootings  that 



took place in The Cottages and Bavarian Village, Shockley was found guilty of murder, 

felony  murder,  and  attempted  robbery.    The  trial  court  merged  the  murder  and  felony 

murder charges and entered judgment of conviction for murder, a felony, and attempted 

robbery as a Class C felony.  Shockley was  sentenced to sixty  years for the murder and 

four  years  for  the  attempted  robbery,  to  run  concurrently.    Shockley  now  appeals.  

Additional facts will be provided as necessary. 

 

 

 



                                                 

1

 Williams was charged with two counts of assisting a criminal. 



 

Discussion and Decision 



I.

 

Evidentiary Rulings 



A.

 

Standard of Review 



 

 

A  trial  court  has  broad  discretion  in  ruling  on  the  admissibility  of  evidence.  



Packer v. State, 800 N.E.2d 574, 578 (Ind. Ct. App. 2003),  trans. denied.   We review a 

trial court’s decision to admit or exclude evidence for an abuse of discretion.  Troutner v. 

State,  951  N.E.2d  603,  611  (Ind.  Ct.  App.  2011),  trans.  denied.    An  abuse  of  discretion 

occurs where the trial court’s decision is clearly against the logic and effect of the facts 

and circumstances before the court.  Id. 

B.

 



Admitted Evidence 

Shockley  contends  that  the  trial  court  erred  by  admitting  evidence  of  the  prior 

shooting  that  took  place  on  the  night  in  question.    Indiana  Evidence  Rule  404(b)  states 

that “[e]vidence of other crimes, wrongs, or acts is not admissible to prove the character 

of  a  person  in  order  to  show  action  in  conformity  therewith.    It  may,  however,  be 

admissible  for  other  purposes,  such  as  proof  of  motive,  intent,  preparation,  plan, 

knowledge, identity, or absence of mistake or accident . . . .”  The rationale behind this 

evidentiary rule is that the jury is precluded from making the “forbidden inference” that 

the  defendant  had  a  criminal  propensity  and  therefore  committed  the  charged  conduct.  

Thompson v. State, 690 N.E.2d 224, 233 (Ind. 1997).  To determine whether Rule 404(b) 

evidence is admissible, “(1) the  court  must determine that the evidence of other crimes, 

wrongs, or acts is relevant to a  matter at issue other than the defendant’s propensity to 



 

commit  the  charged  act;  and  (2)  the  court  must  balance  the  probative  value  of  the 



evidence against its prejudicial effect pursuant to Rule 403.”  Id.   

 

This court has held that “[e]vidence that a defendant had access to a weapon of the 



type used in a crime is relevant to a matter at issue other than the defendant’s propensity 

to commit the charged act.”  Pickens v. State, 764 N.E.2d 295, 299 (Ind. Ct. App. 2002), 

trans.  denied.    Shockley  appears  to  concede  that  evidence  of  the  prior  shooting  was 

relevant  to  prove  he  had  access  to  the  murder  weapon.    He  argues,  however,  that  the 

probative value of this evidence was outweighed by its prejudicial effect.  We disagree. 

 

Evidence  of  the  prior  shooting  was  highly  probative  that  Shockley  had  access  to 



the  murder  weapon.    This  is  especially  true  in  light  of  the  fact  that  Shockley  argued, 

during  closing,  that  it  was  someone  else  who  had  committed  the  murder.    Williams 

testified  that  Shockley  had  a  .22  caliber  long  rifle  while  Perkins  had  a  .380  pistol  the 

night of the shootings.  Williams further testified that he had observed Shockley fire the 

.22  rifle  during  the  first  shooting.    Moreover,  police  determined  that  the  .22  caliber 

casings recovered from The Cottages, Bavarian Village, and the victim’s body were fired 

by the same .22 caliber rifle found near the home of Shockley’s grandmother.  The fact 

that Williams was the same witness who testified regarding both shootings goes towards 

the weight of the evidence and not its admissibility.   

The probative value of this evidence was not outweighed by its prejudicial effect.  

Any  possibility  of  the jury  making  the  forbidden  interference  was  cured  by  the  limiting 

instruction  read  to  the  jury.

2

    Moreover,  the  trial  court  was  careful  to  limit  the  scope  of 



                                                 

2

 The jury was instructed as follows: 



 

 

the evidence presented regarding the prior shooting.  While the court admitted evidence 



that the shooting took place and that similar .22 caliber cases were found at the scene of 

the prior shooting, there was no evidence regarding who, if anyone, was hurt during the 

first  shooting  and  whether  Shockley  was  charged  with  any  additional  crimes.    See 

Thompson,  690  N.E.2d  at  233-35  (holding  that  while  evidence  of  a  prior  theft,  during 

which  the  defendant  stole  the  murder  weapon,  was  relevant  to  prove  access  to  the 

weapon,  the  trial  court  abused  its  discretion  in  the  quantity  and  quality  of  the  evidence 

admitted—including that the theft victim died and that the defendant was convicted of his 

murder).    And  while  Shockley  argues  that  evidence  of  the  prior  shooting  was  not 

necessary to prove access to the murder weapon, evidence is not automatically excluded 

even  if  it  is  cumulative.    See  Hyde  v.  State,  451  N.E.2d  648,  650  (Ind.  1983)  (“The 

admission or rejection of cumulative evidence . . . lies within the sound discretion of the 

trial  court,  and  its  ruling  thereon  will  not  constitute  reversible  error  unless  an  abuse  of 

that discretion is clearly shown.”).  In sum, the trial court did not abuse its discretion in 

admitting evidence of the prior shooting Shockley was allegedly involved in. 

C.

 

Excluded Evidence 



Shockley  contends  that  the  trial  court  erred  by  excluding  evidence  of  the  three 

letters written by Perkins exculpating him.  Generally, out of court statements offered to 

                                                                                                                                                             

 

Evidence has been introduced that the defendant may have been involved in an act other 



than those charged in the information, specifically, that he allegedly fired shots at a location other 

than the Bavarian Village Apartments on June 5, 2011, that is, the Cottages.  This evidence is not 

admissible to show that the defendant has a bad character. 

 

If  you believe that this earlier incident  happened, you should consider it only as it  might 



relate to the defendant’s identity and access to a weapon. 

 

It is for you to decide what weight, if any, to give this evidence. 



 

Appellant’s Appendix at 126.  Despite the language of the limiting instruction, in light of our holding that evidence 

of the prior shooting was properly admitted to prove access to the murder weapon, we need not address whether it 

was also properly admitted to prove Shockley’s identity. 



 

prove the truth of the matter asserted are not admissible into evidence.  See Ind. Evidence 



Rule 802.  Indiana Evidence Rule 804(b) provides a number of exceptions, however, to 

the hearsay rule if the declarant is unavailable as a witness, allowing, in part, admission 

of a statement against interest, which is defined as: 

[a]  statement  which  was  at  the  time  of  its  making  so  far  contrary  to  the 

declarant’s pecuniary or proprietary interest, or so far tended to subject the 

declarant  to  civil  or  criminal  liability,  or  to  render  invalid  a  claim  by  the 

declarant against another, that a reasonable person in the declarant’s position 

would not have made the statement unless believing it to be true. 

 

Evid.R. 804(b)(3).  Here, it is undisputed that Perkins was unavailable to testify at trial.  



However, the trial court found the  letters to  be unreliable and refused to admit  them  on 

that basis.  Shockley argues that this was done in error.  We disagree. 

This  court  has  held  that  the  requirement  of  reliability  is  embodied  within  the 

hearsay  exception  allowing  the  admission  of  statements  against  interest.    See  Bryant  v. 

State, 794 N.E.2d 1135, 1142-43 (Ind. Ct. App. 2003), trans. denied.  Thus, the trial court 

was  within  its  discretion  to  consider  the  reliability  of  the  letters  written  by  Perkins  and 

offered  into  evidence  by  Shockley.    Shockley  cites  the  case  of  Swanigan  v.  State,  720 

N.E.2d 1257 (Ind. Ct. App. 1999), to argue, however, that the trial court should have only 

considered  the  content  of  the  letters  themselves  in  determining  their  reliability.    In 

Swanigan,  the  court  held  that  the  trial  court  had  properly  excluded  letters  written  by  an 

unavailable witness based on the information contained within them.  Id. at 1260.  In so 

doing,  it  noted  that  the  letters  contained  references  to  the  witness’s  drug  and  alcohol 

addiction  and  mental  illness  as  well  as  contradictory  information  regarding  his 

culpability.  Id.  The trial court had also observed the witness on the stand and found him 

not credible.  Id. 


 

While  the  letters  here  may  not  have  contained  contradictory  information  or 



references to any mental health issues as the letters in Swanigan did, the trial court found 

that  the  statements  in  the  letters  directly  contradicted  Perkins’s  testimony,  given  under 

oath, at his guilty plea hearing, during which he indicated that Shockley was the shooter 

in the murder.  The trial court noted that it was “a more specific, explicit detailed guilty 

plea  than I normally take  in this Court.”   Tr. at 12.   The  trial court also noted  that  the 

letters contradicted the statement given  by Perkins to  police and that they arrived at  the 

eve of Perkins’s sentencing hearing and on the morning of Shockley’s trial.  Moreover, 

the  State  was  ready  to  present  evidence  that  Perkins  had  told  his  attorney  that  he  had 

received  threats  from  someone  on  behalf  of  Shockley  to  write  the  letters.    This 

information could have reasonably  led the trial court to believe that  the letters were  not 

reliable.    See  Bryant,  794  N.E.2d  at  1143  (holding  that  the  exclusion  of  a  statement 

against interest was not a strong issue for appeal where the confession did not match the 

circumstances  of  the  robbery  with  which  the  defendant  was  charged,  the  statement  was 

uncorroborated, and it  was not  made to a disinterested witness).   We therefore find that 

the  trial  court  did  not  abuse  its  discretion  in  excluding  the  letters  based  on  their 

unreliability.     

II.

 

Abstract of Judgment 



Both  parties  note  that  the  abstract  of  judgment  incorrectly  states  that  Shockley’s 

conviction  for  attempted  robbery  was  a  Class  A  felony  when  it  was  in  fact  a  Class  C 

felony.  We therefore remand to the trial court with instructions to correct the abstract of 


 

judgment  to  reflect  that  the  conviction  for  attempted  robbery  was  entered  as  a  Class  C 



felony. 

Conclusion 

 

The  trial court did not err  in admitting evidence  of Shockley’s involvement in a 



prior  shooting  or  in  excluding  evidence  of  statements  made  by  a  co-defendant 

exculpating him.  We therefore affirm Shockley’s convictions, but remand for the limited 

purpose of correcting the abstract of judgment. 

 

Affirmed and remanded. 



FRIEDLANDER, J., and CRONE, J., concur. 

 

 



 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə