P. O. Box 63403, Nairobi, Kenya



Yüklə 3.11 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/39
tarix08.08.2017
ölçüsü3.11 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   39
26160

Useful Trees and Shrubs for 

Uganda 


Identification, Propagation and Management 

for Agricultural and Pastoral Communities 

A B Katende, Ann Birnie and Bo Tengnas 

REGIONAL SOIL CONSERVATION UNIT (RSCU) 

1995 


Published by: 

Regional Land Management Unit, RELMA/Sida, ICRAF House, Gigiri 

P. O. Box 63403, Nairobi, Kenya. 

© Regional Land Management Unit (RELMA), Swedish International Development Cooperation 

Agency (Sida) 

Front cover photographs from: 

R E L M A Archives 

Top: Trees near the home are easy to look after and provide shade, beauty and useful 

products 

Bottom: A panoramic view of a Ugandan Landscape 

Editing: 

Bo Tengnas 

Natural Resource Management Consultant ltd. 

S-310 38 Simlangsdalen, Sweden. 

Copy-editing, design and typesetting by: 

Caroline Agola 



P. O. Box 21582, Nairobi-Kenya 

Editor of RSCU series of publications: Paul Rimmerfors/RSCU 

Editor of RELMA series of publications: Alex Oduor/RELMA 

Cataioguing-in-Publication Data: 

Useful Trees and Shrubs for Uganda. Identification and Management for Agricultural and Pastoral 

Communities. By A. B. Katende, Ann Birnie and Bo Tengnas - Kamapala and Nairobi: Regional 

Soil Conservation Units (RSCU), Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), 

1995. 


[Regional Soil Conservation Unit (RSCU) Technical Handbook Series ;10] 

The contents of this manual may be reproduced without special permission. However, 

acknowledgment of the source is requested. Views expressed in the RELMA series of publications 

are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of RELMA/Sida. 

Bibliography: p 

ISBN 9966-896-22-8 



Printed on chlorine free paper by: 

Majestic Printing Works Ltd 

P. O. Box 42466 

Nairobi, Kenya 



• >3H 



Contents 

Foreword v 

Acknowledgements vii 

Introduction ix 

Illustrated glossary of some botanical terms xiv 

PART I 


Common names 1 

PART II 


The useful trees and shrubs 41 

PART III 

Summary table of species and their uses 685 

Bibliography 705 

Feedback form 709 

Maps 

1. The main physical features of Uganda vi 

2. The administrative regions and main towns of Uganda viii 

3. The main vegetation zones of Uganda x 

4. The main forests of Uganda xii 

5. The main language groups of Uganda xxiii 

• 


RELM A Technical Handbook Series no. 10 

The Technical Handbook Series of the Regional Land Management Unit 

1. Curriculumfor In-service Training in Agroforestry and Related Subjects in Kenya. Edited by 

Stachys N. Muturi, 1992 (ISBN 9966-896-03-1) 

2. Agroforestry Manual for Extension Workers with Emphasis on Small-Scah Farmers in Eastern Province, Zambia. 

By Samuel Simute, 1992 (ISBN 9966-896-07-4) 

3. Guidelines on Agroforestry Extension Planning in Kenya. By Bo Tengnas, 1993 (ISBN 9966-896-11-2) 

4. Agroforestry Manual for Extension Workers in Southern Province, Zambia. By Jericho Mulofwa with Samuel 

Simute and Bo Tengnas, 1994 (ISBN 9966-896-14-7) 

5. Useful Trees and Shrubs for Ethiopia: Identification, Propagation and Management for Agricultural and Pastoral 

Communities. By Azene Bekele-Tessema with Anne Birnie and Bo Tengnas, 1993 

(ISBN 9966-896-15-5) 

6. Useful Trees and Shrubs for Tanzania: Identification, Propagation and Management for Agricultural and Pastoral 

Communities. By L.P Mbuya, H.P. Msanga, C.K. Rufo, Ann Birnie and Bo Tengnas, 1994 

(ISBN 9966-896-16-3) 

7. Soil Conservation in Arusha Region, Tanzania: Manual for Extension Workers with Emphasis on Small-Scale 

Farmers. By Per Assmo with Arne Eriksson, 1994 (ISBN 9966-896-19-8) 

8. Curriculumfor Training in Soil and Water Conservation in Kenya. Edited by Stachys N. Muturi and Fabian 

S. Muya, 1994 (ISBN 9966-896-20-1) 

9. The Soils of Ethiopia: Annotated Bibliography. By Berhanu Debele, 1994 (ISBN 9966-896-21 -X) 

10. Useful Trees and Shrubs for Uganda: Identification, Propagation and Management for Agricultural and Pastoral 

Communities. By A.B. Katende, Ann Birnie and Bo Tengnas, 1995 (ISBN 9966-896-22-8) 

11. Agroforestry Extension Manual for Northern Zambia. By Henry Chilufya and Bo Tengnas, 1996 

(ISBN 9966-896-23-6) 

12. Useful Trees and Shrubs in Eritrea: Identification, Propagation and Management for Agricultural and Pastorial 



Communities. By E. Bein, B. Habte, A. Jaber, Ann Birnie and Bo Tengnas, 1996 

(ISBN 9966-896-24-4) 

13. Facilitators'Manual for Communication Skills Workshop. By Pamela Baxter, 1996 (ISBN 9966-896-25-2) 

14. Agroforestry Extension Manual for Extension Workers in Central and Lusaka Provinces, Zambia. 

By Joseph Banda, Penias Banda and Bo Tengnas, 1997 (ISBN 9966-896-31-7) 

15. Integrated Soil Fertility Management on Small-Scale Farms in Eastern Province of Zambia. Edited by  T h o m a s 

Raussen, 1997 (ISBN 9966-896-32-5) 

16. Water Harvesting: An illustrative Manual for Development of Microcatchment Techniques for Crop Production in 



Dry Areas. By M.T. Hai, 1998 (ISBN 9966-896-33-3) 

17. Agroforestry Extension Manual for Eastern Zambia. By Samuel Simute, G.L. Phiri and Bo Tengnas, 

1998 (ISBN 9966-896-36-8) 

18. Banana Production in Uganda: An Essential Food and Cash Crop. By Aloysius Karugaba with Gathiru 

Kimaru, 1999 (ISBN 9966-896-39-2) 

19. Wild Food and Mushrooms of Uganda. By Anthony B. Katende, Paul Ssegawa, Ann Birnie with 

Christine Holding and Bo Tengnas, 1999 (ISBN 9966-896-39-2) 

20. Uganda Land Resources Manual: A Guide for Extension Workers. By Charles Rusoke, Antony Nyakuni, 

Sandra Mwebaze, John Okorio, Frank Akena and Gathiru Kimaru, 2000 (ISBN 9966-896-44-9) 

21. Agroforestry Handbook for the Banana-Coffee Zone of Uganda: Farmers' Practices and Experiences. 

By I. Oluka-Akileng, J. Francis Esegu, Alice A. Kaudia and Alex Lwakuba, 2000 

(ISBN 9966-896-51-1) 



Foreword 

This book is the fourth in a series covering the countries of East Africa published with 

support from SIDA through the Regional Soil Conservation Unit. The corresponding 

handbook for Kenya was published by ICRAF in 1992 with financial support from 

SIDA and technical input from RSCU professionals. The succeeding volumes for 

Ethiopia and Tanzania were published by RSCU in 1993 and 1994, respectively, and 

produced in close collaboration with relevant institutions and individuals in each 

country. 

The major aims of these handbooks are to document the useful tree and shrub 

species of the region and to provide information to subject-matter specialists, extension 

workers, institutions and farmers on species that have production and conservation 

potential for small-scale farmers in the region. 

The present book covering Uganda contains even more species than the earlier 

ones, mainly due to three factors. Firstly, Uganda is extremely rich in tropical species. 

Secondly, RSCU found a Ugandan co-author, A-B. Katende, who has an enormous 

amount of knowledge about the trees of Uganda; knowledge that he willingly made 

available for the production of the book. Thirdly, more forest species have been 

covered than in the earlier books which concentrated more on the agricultural and 

pastoral settings. With growing worldwide interest in the Uganda rain-forest 

ecosystems, the authors felt it was important also to include species from a bio-

diverstity conservation point of view. Thus the size of this book rnay not be as handy 

as one would wish, but RSCU felt it was important to include as much of the 

available information as possible. 

Bo Tengnas, a former RSCU staff member now working as an agroforestry 

consultant, and Ann Birnie, a Nairobi-based botanist, teacher and illustrator, have 

contributed substantially to the production of the book and done the technical editing. 

Mrs Birnie has also organized all the illustrations. 

RSCU publishes this handbook in the hope that it will be widely used by 

individuals, extension workers and educational and research institutions in order to 

foster a greater interest in the growing and management of a wide range of trees and 

shrubs as part of the development of sustainable farming systems in different ecological 

zones of Uganda. 



Erik Skoglund 

Director, Regional Soil Conservation Unit 

Nairobi, August 1995 


USEFUL TREES AND SHRUBS FOR UGANDA 

Map 1. The main physical features of Uganda 



vi 

Acknowledgements 

Most of the material for this book was gathered by A.B. Katende over many years of 

work on the taxonomy and other aspects of trees and their uses in Uganda and during 

a period of extensive travel in Uganda specifically for this book. Discussions were held 

with people knowledgable on trees and shrubs, among whom were many farmers and 

pastoralists. In fact, most of the information in this book derives from rural people in 

East Africa who have enthusiastically shared their knowledge with us. 

Special thanks go to M. Kayondo, Principal Forest Officer, and J.R. Kamugisha, 

Forest Officer, both of the Uganda Forest Department, who liaised between RSCU 

and Mr Katende. Thanks are also due to the Dean of the Faculty of Science, Makerere 

University, who made a Faculty car available for the field work, and to the Head of 

the Botany Department who gave permission for Mr Katende to work on this book. 

Much of the text and many illustrations are from RSCU's companion volumes for 

Kenya, Ethiopia and Tanzania. Several people contributed to the production of those 

books and we acknowledge their contributions to this volume covering Uganda. 

Illustrations 

The majority of the plant illustrations are original drawings by Ann Birnie, many 

taken from Trees of Kenya by T. Noad and A. Birnie. Other drawings have been done 

specially for this book, both from fresh material and from dried specimens either at 

Makerere University Herbarium, Kampala, or at the East African Herbarium, Nairobi. 

Margaret Nagawa and David N. Kato, both Kampala artists, contributed to these 

drawings. Louise Gull in Nairobi contributed four drawings and those of the following 

species were originally published in the children's magazine Rainbow (Stellagraphics 

Ltd., Nairobi): Ricinus communis, Senecio hadiensis, Senna didymobotrya, Solanecio 

mannii and Vernonia auriculifera. A few drawings have been taken from Plants in 

Zanzibar and Pemba by R.O. Williams and Kenya Trees and Shrubs by I.R. Dale and 

P.J. Greenway. More have been used from the earlier volume, Indigenous Trees of the 



Uganda Protectorate by W.J. Eggeling (1951). A few further illustrations have been 

taken from Know Your Trees by A.E.G. Storrs. Unfortunately, it has not been possible 

to view the important timber trees of the Uganda forests in their natural setting, nor, 

within the limitations of this book, to illustrate their towering and majestic forms. 

We acknowledge with thanks the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, for permission to 

use several illustrations that appear in the published family volumes of the Flora of 



Tropical East Africa. The copyright to all the illustrations above remains with the 

original publishers. RSCU would also like to acknowledge the other sources of 

material listed in the bibliography. 

Staff of the East African Herbarium at the National Museums of Kenya in Nairobi 

were most helpful in availing specimens from their collection to facilitate the drawing 

of the illustrations. They were also extremely helpful in providing taxonomic 

information. The Nitrogen Fixing Tree Association assisted us with confirmation of 

species that are known to be nitrogen fixing. 

Thanks are due to Yasmin Kalyan who cheerfully and tirelessly entered the first 

draft on computer. 

Finally, a word of thanks to the Swedish tax payer who, through SIDA, provided 

the funds necessary for the production of this handbook. 



vii 


USEFUL TREES AND SHRUBS FOR UGANDA 

Map 2. The administrative regions and main towns of Uganda 

viii 


Introduction 

Biodiversity in Uganda 

Uganda is the richest of the East African countries in terms of biodiversity, and even 

in a global context it is regarded as one of one of the important centres of biodivers-

ity. 


The country can be divided into several biogeographical zones: 

• Sudano-Congolean (north) 

• Somali-Maasai (north-east) 

• Guinea-Congolean (west, south-west) 

• Afro-montane (mountains) 

• Transition (north-western) 

• Lake Victoria basin (regional mosaic). 

Although there are not many species that are strictly endemic to the country, the 

flora is still of great importance because of its major contribution to regional 

endemism. The Western Rift Valley, as well as the areas around Lakes Edward and 

Victoria,  m u c h of which are within Uganda, are particularly important as many 

species that occur here are not found anywhere else in the world. 

Climatic and physical conditions vary a great deal within short distances in 

Uganda. Areas at higher altitudes have reliable rainfall that can support montane rain 

forests and most areas of the country have sufficient rainfall to support agriculture, 

A large  p r o p o r t i o n of the land area is  n o w under cultivation. 

Reconstructed vegetation maps of Uganda indicate that before the advent of settled 

agriculture, a considerable part of the land surface was covered by forest and all the 

rest of the country was covered with thicket or wooded savanna, except Karamoja 

where the nature of the original vegetation is uncertain. 

Large parts of the country are influenced by their proximity to lakes, of which 

Lake Victoria is the largest. Near the lakes the climate is warm and humid. A 50-80 

km belt around Lake Victoria is believed to have been covered by lowland rain forests 

prior to the introduction of agriculture. Other areas believed to have been covered by 

forests are a strip along the shoulders of the Western Rift Valley in western Uganda 

and the tops of the mountains all over the country. 



The people 

The people of Uganda are heterogeneous and traditions vary significantly from one 

part of the country to another. There are many ethnic groups, all with their  o w n 

languages. Land-use practices also differ a great deal, not only because of different 

ecological conditions but also due to socio-cultural differences. 

In the late 1970s, the age-old practices of agroforestry and community forestry 

began to be given due attention in development efforts world-wide. During those 

years, and up to the mid-1980s, most efforts were concentrated on trying to alleviate 

the fuelwood problem by intensified tree planting, but due to the political turmoil in 

ix 


USEFUL TREES AND SHRUBS FOR UGANDA 

Map 3. The main vegetation zones of Uganda 





INTRODUCTION 

Uganda little support was provided by the Government to farmers during those years. 

More recently, however, numerous projects have been aimed at supporting and 

developing local farmers' tree-growing efforts. 

Forestry has been important in Uganda since colonial times. Makerere University 

has a well-established Faculty of Forestry which had been the leading centre for 

forestry studies in East Africa prior to the establishment of universities in Kenya and 

Tanzania. Logging and sawmilling were important activities in colonial times and have 

recently grown in importance once more. Management of soft-wood plantations with 

exotic species received much attention, while indigenous forests were subject to 

harvesting but given less attention in terms of sustainable management. Forestry 

activities in the indigenous forests have constituted a threat to biodiversity, and several 

valuable forest species have become rare and threatened. 

Gradually officers in development projects world-wide, as well as researchers, have 

come to realize that the priorities of farm families often differ from those project 

designers initially anticipate. It is now felt that development agendas must be worked 

out with the rural people concerned if the projects are to give sustainable results. 

Methods such as diagnosis and design (D&D) developed by ICRAF, and PRA 

participatory rural appraisal (PRA) by the International Institute for Environment and 

Development are promoted. All these methods are based on development workers' 

awareness that the local people always have a wealth of knowledge that needs to be 

the focal point of efforts to improve agroforestry or tree growing in general. 

All too often, however, development workers, whether foreign or national, do not 

communicate effectively with local people on issues related to trees. There is often a 

language barrier if the two groups do not have a common set of names for the trees 

and shrubs that they deal with. Even if English is understood by many people in 

Uganda, there are obvious limitations to communicating in that language when 

discussing,the details of a land-use system. Recognition of this communication gap 

between extension workers and farmers, the need to regard local farmer's experience 

as a focal point in any efforts to improve land use, and the importance of utilizing and 

preserving tree biodiversity in Uganda were the underlying concepts for this book. 

Up-to-date literature on trees was available to few people in Uganda during the 

colonial period. Most of the relevant books are now long since out of print and found 

almost exclusively in libraries of Government institutions in Kampala and London. 

Thus we felt that a new handbook on trees would be useful for a large number of 

people such as extension workers, teachers, students, foresters and other land-use 

managers. An effort has been made to avoid technical language so as to make the book 

accessible to as wide a range of readers as possible. 



Selection of the species to be included 

Determining which of all the tree and shrub species found in Uganda should be 

included and which omitted was a difficult task. Based on the authors' knowledge 

XI 


USEFUL TREES AND SHRUBS FOR UGANDA 

xii 


Map 4. The main forests of Uganda 

INTRODUCTION 

coupled with farmer's knowledge obtained during extensive field visits and consulta-

tions, certain species have emerged as being important to many groups of people. 

During the selection process both indigenous and exotic species have been considered, 

and it was also decided to include a few species which are not strictly trees but giant 

herbs or grasses, e.g. bamboos, Agave sisalana and banana. Some tree species have been 

included because of their ecological value or due to their potential forestry value 

although they may not be of prime importance for local communities. Many of these 

are tropical rain forest species. A few other species have been included because they 

are potentially useful but becoming very rare and close to extinction due to over 

exploitation or other habitat changes. 

Vernacular names 

The average farmer in Uganda seldom uses the English or Latin names for the trees 

and shrubs that he is familiar with; the local languages are still most commonly used 

and will continue to be for a long time. Old people often have much more knowledge 

about the trees and shrubs of their areas than the younger generation. Therefore it is 

important that researchers and development workers wishing to elicit information 

about local plants use the vernacular names that will be familiar to the older people 

in the local community. When this handbook was developed, therefore, it was decided 

to include as many vernacular names as possible, although there are some areas of the 

country that have been poorly covered so far in this respect and where further 

research is needed. 

Ecology 


Under this heading a brief description of the origin and present distribution of the 

species is given, followed by an indication of where it grows in Uganda and, where 

possible, information on the altitudinal range, preferred climatic and soil conditions, 

etc. 


Uses 

Trees and shrubs provide a wide range of benefits to man, both in terms of products 

such as timber or medicine and services such as shade or soil improvement. Such 

information has been summarized for each species under this heading. It must be 

stressed, however, that these are reported uses, i.e. what the local people say they use 

these plants for and it has not been possible to verify the accuracy of all such reports. 

In addition, the known uses of a particular species may vary from one part of the 

country to another, or even from one community to another, and therefore it is 

always necessary to verify these uses with the local people. 

It must also be understood that the species cannot be grown for all of the possible 

uses simultaneously. On the contrary, management of a species often aims at 

optimizing or maximizing a specific product or service. 

xui 


USEFUL TREES AND SHRUBS FOR UGANDA 




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   39


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə