Nternational



Yüklə 115.64 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/28
tarix01.08.2017
ölçüsü115.64 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   28

Editors: Mario González-Espinosa, Jorge A. Meave,
Francisco G. Lorea-Hernández, Guillermo Ibarra-Manríquez and Adrian C. Newton
The Red List of
Mexican
Cloud Forest Trees

F
AUNA &
F
LORA
I
NTERNATIONAL
(FFI)
protects threatened
species and ecosystems worldwide, choosing solutions that are
sustainable, based on sound science and take account of human
needs. Operating in more than 40 countries worldwide - mainly in the
developing world - FFI saves species from extinction and habitats from
destruction, while improving the livelihoods of local people. Founded in
1903, FFI is the world’s longest established international conservation
body and a registered charity.
B
OTANIC
G
ARDENS
C
ONSERVATION
I
NTERNATIONAL
(BGCI)
is a membership organisation linking botanic gardens in over 100
countries in a shared commitment to biodiversity conservation,sustainable
use and environmental education. BGCI aims to mobilize botanic gardens
and work with partners to secure plant diversity for the well-being of
people and the planet. BGCI provides the Secretariat for the IUCN/SSC
Global Tree Specialist Group.
T
HE
G
LOBAL
T
REES
C
AMPAIGN exists to secure the future of the
world’s threatened tree species and their benefits for humans and the
wider environment. A joint initiative between FFI and BGCI, the Global
Trees Campaign is the only international campaign dedicated to saving
threatened trees.
T
HE
IUCN/SSC G
LOBAL
T
REE
S
PECIALIST
G
ROUP forms part
of the Species Survival Commission’s volunteer network of over 7000
volunteers working to stop the loss of plants, animals and their habitats.
SSC is the largest of the six Commissions of IUCN-The World
Conservation Union. It serves as the main source of advice to the Union
and its members on the technical aspects of species conservation. The
aims of the IUCN/SSC Global Tree Specialist Group are to promote and
implement global red listing for trees and act in an advisory capacity to
the Global Trees Campaign.
Published by Fauna & Flora International,
Cambridge, UK.
© 2011 Fauna & Flora International
ISBN: 9781903703281
Reproduction of any part of the publication for
educational,
conservation
and
other
non-profit
purposes is authorized without prior permission from
the copyright holder, provided that the source is fully
acknowledged.
Reproduction for resale or other commercial purposes
is prohibited without prior written permission from the
copyright holder.
The designation of geographical entities in this
document and the presentation of the material do not
imply any expression on the part of the authors or
Fauna & Flora International concerning the legal status
of any country, territory or area, or its authorities, or
concerning the delineation of its frontiers or boundaries.
EDITORS
Mario González-Espinosa is Senior Researcher in
Plant Ecology and Forest Conservation and Restoration
at El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR) and a
member of the IUCN/SSC Global Tree Specialist
Group. mgonzale@ecosur.mx
Jorge A. Meave is Professor in Plant Ecology at the
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)
and the President of the Botanical Society of Mexico.
jorge.meave@ciencias.unam.mx
Francisco G. Lorea-Hernández is Professor and
Researcher in Plant Taxonomy at the Instituto de
Ecología, A.C. francisco.lorea@inecol.edu.mx
Guillermo Ibarra-Manríquez is Researcher in Plant
Ecology and Taxonomy at the Universidad Nacional
Autónoma de México (UNAM) and the Vice
President of the Botanical Society of Mexico.
gibarra@cieco.unam.mx
Adrian Newton is Professor in Conservation Ecology
at Bournemouth University and Vice Chair of the
IUCN/SSC
Global
Tree
Specialist
Group.
anewton@bournemouth.ac.uk
The opinion of the individual authors does not
necessarily reflect the opinion of either the editors or
Fauna & Flora International.
The editors and Fauna & Flora International take no
responsibility for any misrepresentation of material from
translation of this document into any other language.
COVER PHOTOS
Front cover: Ulmus mexicana tree with recently
flushed foliage and flowers, near Santa Cruz
Tepetotutla (Oaxaca). The habitat of this scarce cloud
forest tree has been largely cleared to give way to
maize fields and coffee plantations. The pictured tree
is 60 m but one individual in Chiapas in the 1950s
was recorded at 87 m, making the species the tallest
in Mexico. Photo by J. A. Meave.
Back cover: Interior view of an Oreomunnea
mexicana cloud forest stand in central Veracruz.
Photo by C. Gallardo.
DESIGN
John Morgan, Seascape: www.seascapedesign.co.uk
Printed on 80% recycled, 20% FSC certified paper.

The Red List of
Mexican
Cloud Forest Trees
Editors: Mario González-Espinosa, Jorge A. Meave,
Francisco G. Lorea-Hernández, Guillermo Ibarra-Manríquez and Adrian C. Newton

Acknowledgements
3
List of Acronyms
3
Foreword
4
Introduction
5
References
8
List of Assessors
10
Map
12
R
ED LIST OF MEXICAN CLOUD FOREST TREES
13
Species Evaluated as Least Concern
90
References
126
ANNEX 1
IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria (Version 3.1)
146
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
2
C
ONTENTS
We dedicate this work to the insightful and treasured
teachings of Dr Faustino Miranda and Dr Jerzy Rzedowski,
whose seminal research has inspired and guided our interest
in the beautiful cloud forests of Mexico. It is also dedicated to
the memory of Dr Laura Arriaga, an indefatigable worker on
the ecology of cloud forests and early participant in the
production of this report.

working sessions at their homes in
Xalapa and Mexico City, respectively.
Angélica V. Pulido-Esparza provided
logistic support for the meetings held
during 2007 in San Cristóbal de Las
Casas and Zacatecas. Marco Antonio
Romero-Romero and Alberto Gallardo-
Cruz provided most helpful technical
assistance with the organization of the
information in databases. We are
grateful for an invitation from Isolda
Luna-Vega and Martha Gual Díaz to
present an earlier version of this report
before
the
Mexican
botanical
community
in
a
symposium
on
Mexican Cloud Forest at the XVIII
Mexican Botanical Congress held in
Guadalajara in November 2010. This
was a prime opportunity to expose the
scope and contents of the report,
allowing
us
to
receive
valuable
comments that have helped improve
its content. Financial support was
initially provided by Fauna & Flora
International (FFI, UK) during 2007 and
2008. Thereafter, our home institutions
and other sources kindly provided time
and resources to complete this report
as a side project. Finally, we are
thankful for the patience of Amy
Hinsley at FFI who heard from us on
several occasions that the final version
was imminent, and whose comments
on the text greatly improved the
presentation of this report.
T
HREE-LETTER ACRONYMS OF
THE MEXICAN FEDERAL STATES
Please note that México refers to the
Federal State sometimes also identified
as the State of Mexico (Estado de
México), a territory surrounding nearly
completely the Federal District (Distrito
Federal, where Mexico City is located)
AGS
Aguascalientes
BC
Baja California
BCS
Baja California Sur
CAM
Campeche
CHS
Chiapas
CHI
Chihuahua
COA
Coahuila
COL
Colima
DF
Distrito Federal
DGO
Durango
GTO
Guanajuato
GRO
Guerrero
HGO
Hidalgo
JAL
Jalisco
MEX
México
MIC
Michoacán
MOR
Morelos
NAY
Nayarit
NL
Nuevo León
OAX
Oaxaca
PUE
Puebla
QRO
Querétaro
QTR
Quintana Roo
SLP
San Luis Potosí
SIN
Sinaloa
SON
Sonora
TAB
Tabasco
TAM
Tamaulipas
TLA
Tlaxcala
VER
Veracruz
YUC
Yucatán
ZAC
Zacatecas
3
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
A
CKNOWLEDGEMENTS
T
he initial May 2007 workshop
was
convened
by
the
IUCN/SSC
Global
Tree
Specialist Group, represented by
Adrian
Newton,
and
supported
financially
by
Fauna
&
Flora
International (FFI). The workshop was
organised
by
Adrian
Newton
of
Bournemouth University and Mario
González-Espinosa of ECOSUR, with
advice from the Chair of the IUCN/SSC
Global
Tree
Specialist
Group.
Workshop
participants
(who
are
referred to in the List as Expert Group
May 2007) included Antony Challenger,
Rafael F. del Castillo, Duncan J.
Golicher, Mario González-Espinosa,
Mario Ishiki, José Luis León de la Luz,
Francisco G. Lorea-Hernández, Jorge
A. Meave, Adrian C. Newton, and
Neptalí Ramírez-Marcial.
We are grateful to the many members
of the botanical community in Mexico
who contributed to this report serving
as assessors of plant groups in which
they have taxonomical expertise or
ecological familiarity (please see list
below). In addition, other colleagues
offered comments that helped define
which species and information should
be included or deleted from the list:
Laura Arriaga (deceased), Antony
Challenger, Rafael Fernández-Nava,
Duncan J. Golicher, Martha Gual Díaz,
Jaime Jiménez-Ramírez, José Luis
León de la Luz, Miguel Martínez-Icó,
Daniel Tejero-Díez, Teresa Terrazas-
Salgado, and José Luis Villaseñor.
Guadalupe Williams-Linera and Jorge
A.
Meave
kindly
hosted
several
L
IST OF ACRONYMS

T
he cloud forests of Mexico are
immensely
valuable
for
the
ecosystem goods and services
that they provide. The forests are
exceptionally rich in botanical diversity
with over 2,800 plant species recorded
within them. The diversity of tree species,
approximately 25% of the total botanical
diversity, defines the forest structure and
contributes to the ecological function and
resilience of the forests. The trees also
provide a wide range of products valued
by local people. Unfortunately the cloud
forests of Mexico, as elsewhere in the
world, are under severe threat. The
component trees are also threatened with
extinction to a varying degree. This report
presents a review of the conservation
status of the Mexican cloud forest trees,
undertaken
by
Mexican
experts
in
partnership with FFI and the IUCN/SSC
Global Tree Specialist Group. It is the
result of a remarkable collaborative
process over four years bringing together
botanists and ecologists who care about
the future of the forests and trees of
Mexico.
Since its establishment in 2003 the
primary role of the IUCN/SSC Global Tree
Specialist Group has been to assess the
global conservation status of tree species
in selected geographical areas and
taxonomic groups. The Red List of
Mexican Cloud Forest Trees is the
seventh publication in the series. It is the
ultimate aim of the Group to carry out a
full assessment of the status of the
world’s trees. As a step towards this goal,
the Group is currently concentrating on
“Trees at the top of the World” – high
altitude trees that are likely to be
particularly impacted by the effects of
climate change.
The collection of information on tree
species of conservation concern is vital for
planning conservation action and the
restoration of forest ecosystems. The
secondary role of the IUCN/SSC Global
Tree Specialist Group is to act as an
advisory body for the Global Trees
Campaign, which aims to save the world’s
most threatened tree species and the
habitats where they grow. The Global Trees
Campaign provides an important practical
mechanism for implementation of the
Global Plant Conservation Strategy of the
Convention on Biological Diversity. Global
tree red listing contributes directly to Target
2 of the Strategy, which calls for an
assessment of the conservation status of
all known plant species, as far as possible,
to guide conservation action by 2020.
Target 2 underpins the other ambitious
targets which relate to in situ and ex situ
conservation,
ecological
restoration,
sustainable use and trade in plants.
Projects of the Global Trees Campaign
carried
out
in
partnership
with
organizations and individuals around the
world help to deliver these various
targets. The projects contribute to halting
the loss of forest biodiversity and the
provision of support to rural livelihoods.
The results of this assessment indicate
that over 60% of the trees of Mexican
cloud
forests
are
threatened
with
extinction. Clearly action must be taken
to conserve and restore the forests as a
matter of urgency.
Sara Oldfield
Chair of the IUCN/SSC Global Tree
Specialist Group
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
4
F
OREWORD
Upwards view of the trunk of an Oreomunnea
mexicana tree with epiphytes, mosses and
lichens in a cloud forest stand in central
Veracruz. Photo by C. Gallardo.

5
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
C
LOUD FORESTS IN MEXICO
The term cloud forest is used to refer to
transitional forest communities occurring in
Mexico in tropical and subtropical humid
mountains located south of the 25° N
parallel, at elevations mostly between
1,500 and 2,500 m (1, 8, 30, 31). However,
Luna et al. (16) claim that topography and
the amount of humidity may account for
the presence of cloud forests across a
much broader elevational belt ranging
between 600 and 3,200 m. Cloud forests
in Mexico are mostly found on steep
slopes and protected ravines. These areas
are more humid than pine, pine-oak and
oak forests, warmer than high elevation
conifer forests, and cooler than those that
support the development of tropical plant
formations.
Cloud
forests
in
Mexico
have
an
archipelago-like
distribution
and
are
floristically
very
rich,
owing
to
the
enormous variety of habitats and the wide
contact between Holarctic and Neotropical
floras in the country (18, 24, 25, 26). It has
been estimated that cloud forests in
Mexico occupy 10,000–20,000 km
2
,
which is 0.5–1.0% of the national territory
(8, 10, 15, 20, 24, 25). As in other regions
of the world where these forests occur,
their habitat is considered unique among
terrestrial ecosystems: it is strongly linked
to processes of cloud formation and a
resulting
near
constant
atmospheric
saturation. This provides the forests with
their characteristic high relative humidity in
the form of clouds and mist (13, 28).
Mexican cloud forests, together with other
similar forests in the world, are recognized
as one of the most globally threatened
plant formations because of their naturally
scattered distribution along a narrow
elevational belt in which intense land-use
change continues to take place (1, 3, 6, 7,
8, 13, 30, 32). In addition to forest
fragmentation owing to deforestation,
cloud forests are expected to be among
the ecosystems most affected by global
climatic change (11, 14, 21, 22, 29, 32).
Consequently, not only is the biodiversity
of cloud forests in peril, but also the
environmental services that they provide to
society at large: climate regulation, soil
nutrient cycles, natural products, scenic
beauty, and most importantly, water
supply.
Furthermore,
even
if
global
warming were not a major driver of species
extinctions in cloud forests, the biota of
these
ecosystems
remains
highly
vulnerable
to
exceptionally
dry
meteorological events (2).
The
remarkable
floristic
richness
of
Mexican cloud forests has been widely
recognized but there have been few
systematic attempts at compiling an
inventory (e.g. 26, 31). Rzedowski (26) lists
c. 2,500 vascular plant species restricted
to cloud forests, belonging to 650 genera
within 144 botanical families. In a more
recent attempt to estimate their floristic
richness, Villaseñor (31) applied digital
filters and geographic information systems
to an exhaustive dataset derived from the
existing cloud forest literature. Using a
broader definition of cloud forest than that
adopted
in
this
report,
he
reports
somewhat larger numbers: 2,822 vascular
plant species, 815 genera and 176
botanical families. Broadly speaking,
around 10% of the species, 52% of the
genera, and 82% of the plant families
recorded from Mexico are found in the
country’s cloud forests (31). The causes of
the outstanding species diversity in
Mexican cloud forests is yet to be fully
explained but factors proposed include
their biogeographical history, fragmented
distribution, intimate contact with many
other vegetation types and patterns of
human disturbance (8, 16, 23, 24, 31).
The contribution of cloud forests to
Mexico’s endemic plant species is also
high: an estimated 30–35% of the
country’s
endemic
plants
are
from
cloud forest (25, 31). Rzedowski (26)
identified nine botanical families that
are virtually restricted to cloud forest in
Mexico (Brunelliaceae, Chloranthaceae,
Cunoniaceae,
Hamamelidaceae,
Illiciaceae, Podocarpaceae, Proteaceae,
Sabiaceae and Winteraceae), and quotes
the following genera as distinctive of this
forest
type:
Alfaroa
(Juglandaceae),
Carpinus
(Betulaceae),
Cornus
(Cornaceae),
Meliosma
(Sabiaceae),
Liquidambar (Altingiaceae), Oreomunnea
(Juglandaceae), Oreopanax (Araliaceae),
Cinnamomum
(Lauraceae),
Quercus
(Fagaceae),
Styrax
(Styracaceae),
Symplocos
(Symplocaceae)
and
Zinowiewia (Celastraceae).
While it is difficult to pinpoint flagship
species
for
the
habitat,
potential
candidates are Carpinus caroliniana
(Betulaceae),
Chiranthodendron
pentadactylon (Malvaceae), Liquidambar
styraciflua (Altingiaceae), Oreomunnea
mexicana (Juglandaceae), Oreopanax
echinops (Araliaceae), and Podocarpus
matudae
(Podocarpaceae),
although
none of these species occurs throughout
this forest type in Mexico.
The largest cloud forest tracts in Mexico
are located in the Sierra Madre Oriental,
the Sierra Norte de Oaxaca (Northern
Oaxaca Range), the Sierra Madre del Sur,
the Northern Mountains of Chiapas and
the Sierra Madre de Chiapas. Perhaps the
most remarkable cloud forest region in
Mexico is found in the very humid
mountains of northern Oaxaca, where the
average total annual precipitation generally
exceeds 5,000 mm in many places,
particularly at elevations between 1,600
and 2,500 m.
Cloud forests in Mexico and the notable
biodiversity that they harbour currently face
a number of severe threats. During the last
half-century the highest deforestation rates
have been reported in cloud forests,
I
NTRODUCTION

The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
6
3. Plant morphological scope
It was decided to restrict the assessment
to tree species. In addition to their
ecological and structural importance, there
is considerably more information available
for trees compared to other growth forms.
A tree was defined as a monopodic woody
plant with a crown height no less than 4 m.
It was decided not to include palms,
cycads, arborescent ferns or large shrub
species, although plants reported to have
both tree and shrub growth forms are
included.
4. Successional scope
The report focuses on tree species that
occur in old-growth cloud forests. Cloud
forest specialists are expected to be highly
vulnerable to climate change. They are also
likely to be threatened because of the
restricted and fragmented distribution of
this forest type and its rapid rate of loss.
Global warming and deforestation might
favour the expansion of disturbance-
related
species
currently
found
in
secondary vegetation derived from old-
growth cloud forests and they are also
included in the report. Information on these
latter species may be helpful in predicting
changes in the composition of cloud forest
and other neighbouring plant formations.
5. Sources of taxonomical information
Taxonomic information on Mexican cloud
forest tree species is highly heterogeneous,
with many groups urgently in need of
revision. Whenever possible, experts with
first-hand knowledge on the taxonomy of
Mexican cloud forest trees and its related
literature were consulted. The description
and geographical distribution of each
species was obtained from relevant floras
and checklists, and in many cases involved
the examination of herbarium voucher
specimens. Contributing assessors were
also advised to consult the TROPICOS
®
database (maintained by the Missouri
Botanical Garden) as a useful information
source. The adopted names of familes and
Mexican cloud forest tree species. In
October 2007 a second meeting, attended
by more than 15 experts, was held in the
city of Zacatecas, coinciding with the XVII
Mexican Botanical Congress. Further
meetings of small regional specialist
groups were held in Xalapa and Mexico
City from 2007 to 2009. The editors
compiled the final edition of the report from
October 2009 to early March 2011.
Experts at the two 2007 meetings agreed
on a number of points to guide the
process:
1. Geographical scope
It was decided not to focus exclusively on
Mexican endemic species, but to include
cloud forest tree species that are present in
Mexico but may also occur elsewhere in
North America, in Central or South
America,
or
in
the
Caribbean.
Exceptionally, a few taxa also occur in SE
Asia. The status assessment for each
species is aimed to be global and not only
applicable to Mexico.
2. Ecological scope
In this report cloud forest mostly includes
humid forests between 1,500 and 2,500
m elevation, but cloud forest stands may
occur at elevations as low as 900 m or as
high as 3,000 m; there are cases
of
isolated
mountains
and
outlying
ridges
of
major
ranges
where
the
Massenerhebung’ effect (12) is evident
and elevational vegetation belts are
compressed. Cloud forest, as defined in
this report, is also known in the literature
as tropical montane cloud forest and is
roughly equivalent to the term bosque
mesófilo
de
montaña,
defined
by
Rzedowski (24), which is widely used in
Mexico. Whilst the report focuses on cloud
forest trees, it was noted that many
species are also able to grow in other
forest types, such as oak or pine-oak
forests, or even humid or dry tropical
forests occurring at lower elevations.
considering both Mexico as a whole (4, 5)
and for regions that still have considerable
cloud forest cover (6, 9). In addition to
global climate change, threats to cloud
forest biodiversity derive from a poor
representation of cloud forests within
protected areas, extensive changes in
land-use patterns that do not favour
biodiversity, continued human population
expansion into mountainous regions, and
slow progress in alleviating poverty and
marginalization.
CONABIO (8) and Toledo-Aceves et al. (30)
compiled recommendations made by a
large panel of experts on Mexican cloud
forests. Most of these will be of limited
application unless reliable basic information
is made readily available to a wide group
of stakeholders, including government
officials, NGOs, academic institutions,
grassroots groups, and indigenous and
peasant communities. This report aims to
contribute to the provision of information
needed to support the planning and
implementation
of
more
effective
conservation and development in Mexican
cloud forest regions.
H
OW THIS RED LIST WAS COMPILED
The preparation of this report started with
a workshop held in May 2007 at El Colegio
de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), in San
Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico.
The workshop brought together experts
knowledgeable on the flora of this
biodiversity hotspot to assess the global
conservation status of tree species in
montane Mexico. The workshop aimed to
reach definitions and advances on: (i) the
scope and content of the assessment
described in this report; (ii) the application
of the IUCN Red List categories and criteria
for species conservation assessment using
a ‘pilot’ list of 506 candidate cloud forest
tree species from Chiapas; and (iii) the
steps required to promote the widest
possible collaboration of relevant Mexican
scientists to compile an initial list of

7
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
arrangement of the genera follows the
system proposed by the Angiosperm
Phylogeny Group II (APG II) (27). The
authors in plant names follow The
International
Plant
Names
Index
(www.ipni.org [accessed from October
2009 to March 2011]).
6. Sources of ecological information
Whenever possible, experts with first-hand
field knowledge of Mexican cloud forest
ecology and associated literature were
consulted. Many cloud forest areas in
Mexico are still poorly known, yet the
amount of recent literature that includes
plant lists and population size estimates for
Mexican tree species was surprisingly high,
as well as studies dealing with their actual
or potential uses and restoration practices.
7. Information on each species
The report provides as much relevant
information on each species as possible.
Readers
will
notice
that
there
is
considerable heterogeneity among species
entries, a consequence of the large
number of people who participated in the
project.
The list of federal states showing the
distribution of the taxon in Mexico is
arranged
in
a
general
geographical
sequence from north to south and west to
east. Whenever possible, the main text
contains information on growth form and
size, vegetation types where the species is
found in addition to cloud forest, notes on
its
taxonomy,
and
synonyms.
The
elevational range is mostly based on the
records of species occurrence. It was
decided not to include distribution maps of
the species based on georeferenced
herbarium vouchers or floristic inventories,
as this information is still in the process of
being taxonomically and geographically
verified; in addition, there are some
ongoing projects aimed at providing maps
based on different models of species
distributions.
A frequently used source of information on
common names was the remarkable
encyclopedic compilation for Mexican
plants by Martínez (17). Only common
names used in Mexico are included
(without indication of the native language).
An attempt was made to include as much
information as possible on current or
potential uses of the species as this may
help develop practices that promote their
sustainable use and conservation. For
some species information on techniques
useful for restoration of their populations is
provided.
Assessors’
acronyms
are
listed
in
decreasing order of their involvement in
the assessment of the species; this may
be useful for readers interested in
contacting
assessors
for
further
information. An effort was made to
provide an extensive literature guide for as
many species as possible, with the aim of
contributing to design and implementation
of more effective conservation and
management plans.
N
UMERICAL SYNTHESIS AND FINAL
REMARKS
The Red List of Mexican cloud forest trees
includes
a
total
of
762
species,
representing 85 botanical families. The
distribution of these species across the
IUCN categories is indicated in the table
below. These figures imply that over 60%
of the tree flora of the Mexican cloud
forests is threatened to some extent. This
provides clear evidence of the need to
strengthen conservation efforts within the
region.
The Red List presented here is highly
dependent on expert judgement. An
implication of this was the exclusion of a
number of species that have been
formerly reported as Mexican cloud forest
trees. This decision was made when the
assessors considered them to be (i)
botanical misidentifications, rather than a
rare occurrence or due to a lack of recent
taxonomic treatments or experts in the
taxonomy of particular groups, (ii) not truly
trees, even if they were reported by
collectors as surpassing the 4 m height
threshold, or (iii) species absent from
cloud forest habitats. It is hoped that by
adopting these criteria the repetition of
mistakes
in
the
literature
can
be
minimized.
It is important to note the uncertainty
associated with the Red List classifications
presented here, arising from the lack of
detailed information on the distribution
and abundance of many species, and the
fact that expert judgement had to be relied
on as a principal source of information.
Such problems have consistently been
encountered in Red List assessments of
tree species (19), as in assessments of
many other groups. These assessments
should therefore be viewed as provisional,
and as providing a basis for future
refinement.
The
editors
welcome
suggestions for amendment or clarification
and it is hoped this assessment will
stimulate further work to remedy those
areas of particular uncertainty.
The content of this report emerged from
the collaboration between a large number
of colleagues, yet the editors take full
responsibility for its contents and any
omissions.
SUMMARY OF RESULTS
Conservation
Number of
status
species (%)
Extinct
3 (0.4)
Critically Endangered
83 (10.9)
Endangered
206 (27.0)
Vulnerable
175 (23.0)
Near Threatened
78 (10.2)
Data Deficient
2 (0.3)
Least Concern
215 (28.3)
Not Evaluated
0 (0)

1. Aldrich M., Billington C., Edwards
M. and Laidlaw R. (1997) Tropical
Montane Cloud Forests: An Urgent
Priority for Conservation. World
Conservation Monitoring Centre,
WCMC Biodiversity Bulletin No. 2,
Cambridge, UK.
2. Anchukaitis K.J. and Evans M.N.
(2010) Tropical cloud forest climate
variability and the demise of the
Monteverde golden toad.
Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences of the USA,
107, 5036–5040.
3. Bubb P., May I., Miles L. and
Sayer J. (2004) Cloud Forest
Agenda. United Nations
Environmental Programme - World
Conservation Monitoring Centre,
Cambridge, UK.
4. Cairns M.A., Dirzo R. and Zadroga
F. (1995) Forests in Mexico: a
diminishing resource? Journal of
Forestry, 93, 21–24.
5. Cairns M.A., Haggerty P.K.,
Alvarez R., De Jong B.H.J. and
Olmstead I. (2000) Tropical
Mexico’s recent land-use and land-
cover change: a region’s
contribution to the global carbon
cycle. Ecological Applications, 10,
1426–1441.
6. Cayuela L., Golicher D.J. and
Rey-Benayas J.M. (2006) The
extent, distribution, and
fragmentation of vanishing montane
cloud forest in the Highlands of
Chiapas, Mexico. Biotropica, 38,
544–554.
7. Challenger A. (1998) Utilización y
Conservación de los Ecosistemas
Terrestres de México: Pasado,
Presente y Futuro. Comisión
Nacional para el Conocimiento y
Uso de la Biodiversidad/Universidad
Nacional Autónoma de
México/Agrupación Sierra Madre,
Mexico City, Mexico.
8. CONABIO (2010) El Bosque
Mesófilo de Montaña en México:
Amenazas y Oportunidades para su
Conservación y Manejo Sostenible.
Comisión Nacional para el
Conocimiento y Uso de la
Biodiversidad, Mexico City, Mexico.
9. De Jong B.H.J., Cairns M.A.
Haggerty P.K., Ramírez-Marcial
N., Ochoa-Gaona S., Mendoza-
Vega J., González-Espinosa M.
and March-Mifsut I. (1999) Land-
use change and carbon flux
between 1970’s and 1990’s in
central highlands of Chiapas,
Mexico. Environmental
Management, 23, 373–385.
10. Flores Mata G., Jiménez J.,
Madrigal Sánchez X., Moncayo F.
and Takaki Takaki F. (1971)
Memoria del Mapa de Tipos de
Vegetación de la República
Mexicana. Secretaría de Recursos
Hidráulicos, Mexico City. Mexico.
11. Foster P. (2001) The potential
negative impact of global climate
change on tropical montane cloud
forests. Earth Science Reviews, 55,
73–106.
12. Grubb P.J. (1971) Interpretation of
the ‘Massenerhebung’ effect on
tropical mountains. Nature, 229,
44–45.
13. Hamilton L.S., Juvik J.O. and
Scatena F.N. (1995) Tropical
Montane Cloud Forests. Ecological
Studies 110. Springer, New York.
USA.
14. Lawton R.O., Nair U.S., Pielke Sr.
R.A. and Welch R.M. (2001)
Climatic impact of tropical lowland
deforestation on nearby montane
cloud forest. Science, 294, 584–
587.
15. Leopold A.S. (1959) Wildlife of
Mexico. University of California
Press, Berkeley, USA.
16. Luna I., Velázquez A. and
Velázquez E. (2001) México. In:
Kappelle M. and Brown A.D. Eds.
Bosques Nublados del Neotrópico.
(eds Kappelle M. and Brown A.D.),
pp. 183–229. Instituto Nacional de
Biodiversidad, Heredia, Costa Rica.
17. Martínez M. (1994) Catálogo de
Nombres Vulgares y Científicos de
Plantas Mexicanas. 3rd edition,
Fondo de Cultura Económica,
Mexico City, Mexico.
18. Miranda F. (1947) Estudios sobre la
vegetación de México – V. Rasgos
de la vegetación en la Cuenca del
Río de las Balsas. Revista de la
Sociedad Mexicana de Historia
Natural, 8, 95–113.
19. Newton A.C. and Oldfield S.
(2008) Red Listing the world’s tree
species: a review of recent progress.
Endangered Species Research 6,
137–147.
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
8
R
EFERENCES

9
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
20. Palacio-Prieto J.L., Bocco G.,
Velázquez A., Mas J.-F., Takaki-
Takaki F., Victoria A., et al. (2000)
La condición actual de los recursos
forestales en México: resultados del
Inventario Forestal Nacional 2000.
Investigaciones Geográficas, 43,
83–203.
21. Pounds A.J., Fogden P.L. and
Campbell J.H. (1999). Biological
response to climate change on a
tropical mountain. Nature, 398,
611–615.
22. Pounds A.J. and Puschendorf R.
(2004) Clouded futures. Nature,
427,107–109.
23. Ramírez-Marcial N., González-
Espinosa M. and Williams-Linera
G. (2001) Anthropogenic
disturbance and tree diversity in
montane rain forests in Chiapas,
Mexico. Forest Ecology and
Management, 154, 311–326.
24. Rzedowski J. (1978) Vegetación de
México. Limusa, Mexico City, Mexico.
25. Rzedowski, J. (1993) Diversity and
origins of the phanerogamic flora of
Mexico. In: Biological Diversity of
Mexico: Origins and Distribution.
(eds Ramamoorthy T.P., Bye R., Lot
A. and Fa J.), pp. 129–144. Oxford
University Press, New York, USA.
26. Rzedowski J. (1996) Análisis
preliminar de la flora vascular de los
bosques mesófilos de montaña de
México. Acta Botanica Mexicana,
35, 25–44.
27. Stevens P.F. (2008) Angiosperm
Phylogeny Website. Version 9,
June 2008. Available at:
http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/
research/APweb/.
28. Still C.J., Foster P.N., and
Schneider S.H. (1999) Simulating
the effects of climate change on
tropical montane cloud forests.
Nature, 398, 608–610.
29. Téllez-Valdés O., Dávila-Aranda P.
and Lira-Saade R. (2006) The
effects of climate change on the
long-term conservation of Fagus
grandifolia var. mexicana, an
important species of the cloud forest
in Eastern Mexico. Biodiversity and
Conservation, 15, 1095–1107.
30. Toledo-Aceves T., Meave J.A.,
González-Espinosa M. and
Ramírez-Marcial N. (2011) Tropical
montane cloud forests: current
threats and opportunities for their
conservation and sustainable
management in Mexico. Journal of
Environmental Management, 92,
974–981.
31. Villaseñor J.L. (2010) El Bosque
Húmedo de Montaña en México y
sus Plantas Vasculares: Catálogo
Florístico-Taxonómico. Comisión
Nacional para el Conocimiento y
Uso de la Biodiversidad
/Universidad Nacional Autónoma de
México, Mexico City, Mexico.
32. Williams-Linera G. (2007)
El Bosque de Niebla del Centro de
Veracruz: Ecología, Historia y
Destino en Tiempos de
Fragmentación y Cambio Climático.
Comisión Nacional para el
Conocimiento y Uso de la
Biodiversidad/Instituto de Ecología,
A.C., Xalapa, Mexico.

ECG
FLH
GCT
GIM
GWL
ILV
JAM
JCS
LLM
LMG
LSV
MII
Eleazar CARRANZA GONZÁLEZ
Francisco G. LOREA-HERNÁNDEZ
Guadalupe CORNEJO-TENORIO
Guillermo IBARRA-MANRÍQUEZ
Guadalupe WILLIAMS-LINERA
Isolda LUNA-VEGA
Jorge A. MEAVE
Jorge CALÓNICO-SOTO
Lauro LÓPEZ-MATA
Luz María GONZÁLEZ VILLARREAL
Lázaro Rafael SÁNCHEZ-VELÁZQUEZ
Mario ISHIKI ISHIHARA
Red de Biodiversidad y Sistemática, Instituto de Ecología,
A.C., Centro Regional del Bajío, 61600 Pátzcuaro, Michoacán,
Mexico
Red de Biodiversidad y Sistemática, Instituto de Ecología,
A.C., 91070 Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico
Centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, Universidad
Nacional Autónoma de México, 58190 Morelia, Michoacán,
Mexico
Centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, Universidad
Nacional Autónoma de México, 58190 Morelia, Michoacán,
Mexico
Red de Biología Funcional, Instituto de Ecología, A.C., 91070
Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de
México, 04510 México, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de
México, 04510 México, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Departamento de Botánica, Instituto de Biología, Universidad
Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, Distrito
Federal, Mexico
Programa de Botánica, Colegio de Postgraduados, 56230
Montecillo, Estado de México, Mexico
Departamento de Botánica y Zoología, Universidad de
Guadalajara, 44100 Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; Department
of Biology, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53744 WI, USA
Instituto de Biotecnología y Ecología Aplicada, Universidad
Veracruzana, 91190 Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico
Departamento de Ecología y Sistemática Terrestres, El Colegio
de la Frontera Sur, 29290 San Cristóbal de Las Casas,
Chiapas, Mexico
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
10
L
IST OF ASSESSORS
(acronyms used in the text, in alphabetical order)

11
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
MGE
MJP
MMG
NRM
RDC
RDS
RPL
SAC
SAR
SVA
YVR
Mario GONZÁLEZ-ESPINOSA
María de Jesús PERALTA
Martha J. MARTÍNEZ-GORDILLLO
Neptalí RAMÍREZ-MARCIAL
Rafael F. DEL CASTILLO
Jesús Ricardo DE SANTIAGO
María del Rosario PINEDA-LÓPEZ
Salvador ACOSTA-CASTELLANOS
Silvia AGUILAR RODRÍGUEZ
Susana VALENCIA-ÁVALOS
Yalma L. VARGAS-RODRÍGUEZ
Departamento de Ecología y Sistemática Terrestres, El Colegio
de la Frontera Sur, 29290 San Cristóbal de Las Casas,
Chiapas, Mexico
Red de Biología Funcional, Instituto de Ecología, A.C., 91070
Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de
México, 04510 México, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Departamento de Ecología y Sistemática Terrestres, El Colegio
de la Frontera Sur, 29290 San Cristóbal de Las Casas,
Chiapas, Mexico
Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigación para el Desarrollo
Integral Regional-Unidad Oaxaca, Instituto Politécnico
Nacional, 71230 Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de
México, 04510 México, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Instituto de Biotecnología y Ecología Aplicada, Universidad
Veracruzana, 91190 Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico
Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico
Nacional, 11340 México, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional
Autónoma de México, 54090 Los Reyes Iztacala, Estado de
México, Mexico
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de
México, 04510 México, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Departamento de Botánica y Zoología, Universidad de
Guadalajara, 44100 Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; Department
of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
70803 LA, USA

The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
12
A. Location of the Mexican Federal States.
B. Distribution of montane cloud forest in Mexico (dark grey spots), based on a map by the Comisión
Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad (CONABIO) (Toledo-Aceves et al. 2011).
Map credits: M.A. Romero-Romero.

13
The Red List of Mexican Cloud Forest Trees
A
CANTHACEAE



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   28


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə