Nfection and



Yüklə 102.04 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü102.04 Kb.

I

NFECTION AND

I

MMUNITY


, May 1995, p. 1975–1979

Vol. 63, No. 5

0019-9567/95/$04.00

ϩ0

Copyright



᭧ 1995, American Society for Microbiology

Discrimination of Virulent and Avirulent Streptococcus suis

Capsular Type 2 Isolates from Different Geographical Origins

SYLVAIN QUESSY,* J. DANIEL DUBREUIL, MARTINE CAYA,

AND

ROBERT HIGGINS



Groupe de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses du Porc, Faculte´ de Me´decine Ve´te´rinaire, Universite´ de Montre´al,

C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, Que´bec, Canada J2S 7C6

Received 1 October 1993/Returned for modification 16 November 1993/Accepted 24 January 1994



In an effort to relate the protein profile to virulence, proteins from the cellular fractions and from culture

supernatants of Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 strains from different geographical origins were compared by

using Western blots (immunoblots). The protein profiles of the cellular fractions were similar for the majority

of virulent and avirulent isolates studied, with the exception of three virulent Canadian strains for which a

135-kDa protein was not detected. Examination of the culture supernatants revealed the presence of a 135-kDa

protein in all strains except the same three virulent Canadian isolates. In addition, a 110-kDa protein was

present in 14 of 16 virulent strains and not in avirulent isolates. When injected into mice, the 110-kDa protein

induced an immunoglobulin G response and protected against infection with homologous and heterologous

virulent strains. Four strains (1330, 0891, TD10, and R75/S2) that were avirulent in the mouse model of

infection and four other strains (1591, 999, JL590, and AAH4) that were virulent in the mouse model were

injected into pigs. All virulent strains reproduced the disease, and all avirulent strains failed to reproduce the

disease (with the exception of transient lameness in one case and fever in another case). The 110-kDa protein

therefore appears to be a reliable virulence marker and a good candidate for a subunit vaccine.

Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 is an important worldwide

cause of septicemia and meningitis in swine (1). It can also

induce clinical manifestations in humans (2). Little is known

about the pathogenesis of the infection. Williams (16) has

reported that virulent strains could survive within macro-

phages. Vecht et al. (15) have described for European isolates

a 110-kDa extracellular factor (EF) and a 136-kDa cell wall

protein previously known as the muraminidase-released pro-

tein (MRP). These proteins were present only in strains viru-

lent for pigs and therefore were reported to be virulence mark-

ers. On the basis of the presence of MRP and EF in the culture

supernatants of the strains, three phenotypes were described:

MRP

ϩ

EF



ϩ

, virulent strains; MRP

ϩ

EF

Ϫ



, strains associated

with slight pathological changes; and MRP

Ϫ

EF

Ϫ



, avirulent

strains (15). The same authors subsequently developed a dou-

ble-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

with monoclonal antibodies directed against those two viru-

lence markers to discriminate virulent and avirulent isolates

(14).


Healthy carrier pigs are thought to play an important role in

the epidemiology of the S. suis capsular type 2 infections (1).

Since vaccination often leads to equivocal results, the detection

of animals carrying virulent strains could be very helpful in the

prevention of the infection (1). Furthermore, the characteriza-

tion of virulent and avirulent isolates, the identification of

virulence determinants, and the development of an experimen-

tal model of infection are important steps towards understand-

ing of the pathogenesis of the infection (10). Mouse models

have proven to be an important tool in studying S. suis capsular

type 2 infections, allowing the evaluation of bacterial virulence

(3, 8, 17).

In this study, we have compared, using Western blots (im-

munoblots), the immunogenicities of proteins from the cellular

fractions and the culture supernatants of S. suis serotype 2

strains from different geographical origins with the aim of

relating the protein profile to the virulence of the strains. We

identified a virulence marker and evaluated its protective effect

by using the experimental mouse model of infection.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Bacterial strains and growth conditions.

Twenty S. suis capsular type 2 isolates

were used in this study. The serotype 2 reference strain (735), isolated in Den-

mark, was provided by J. Henrichsen, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Den-

* Corresponding author. Phone: (514) 773-7730, ext. 101. Fax: (514)

773-8152.

TABLE 1. Evaluation of the virulence of S. suis capsular type 2

strains from different origins in an experimental murine model

of infection

Strain


Origin

(country/species)

No. of

dead


mice

a

Degree


of

virulence



b

1591


Canada/pig

9

HV



999

Canada/pig

9

HV

JL590



Mexico/pig

9

HV



559

Canada/pig

8.5

HV

4/3 H1



Canada/pig

8.5


HV

4/39 H1


Canada/pig

8.5


HV

4/40 H2


Canada/pig

8

HV



735

Denmark/pig

7

HV

AAH4



United States/pig

7

HV



614

United States/pig

6.5

HV

JL819



Mexico/pig

5.5


MV

AR770357


Netherlands/human

5

MV



6891

Canada/pig

4

MV

4223



Canada/pig

3.5


MV

AR770297


Netherlands/human

3.5


MV

0891


Canada/pig

1

AV



TD10

United Kingdom/pig

1

AV

R75/S2



United Kingdom/pig

0

AV



1330

Canada/pig

0

AV

a



Means of two separate experiments. Ten mice were tested.

b

HV, highly virulent (seven or more deaths); MV, moderately virulent (three

to six deaths); AV, avirulent (fewer than three deaths) (3).

1975


mark. Strains R75/S2 and TD10, from the United Kingdom, were provided by

T. J. L. Alexander, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of

Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Isolates from the United States,

AAH4 and 614, were provided by Brad Fenwick, Kansas State University, Man-

hattan. Mexican isolates, JL590 and JL819, were provided by Jose Luis Monter

Flores, University of Toluca, Toluca, Mexico. Isolates from The Netherlands,

AR770297 and AR770357, were provided by J. P. Arends, Groningen, The

Netherlands. The other 11 isolates were from the Faculty of Veterinary Medi-

cine, University of Montreal, St-Hyacinthe, Canada. With the exceptions of

strains 4/40 H2, 4/3 H1, and 4/39 H1 (from healthy pigs), AR770297 and

AR770357 (from human meningitis cases), and 741 (from bovine abortion), all

strains originated from diseased pigs.

For each strain, four colonies from a 24-h culture on 5% bovine blood agar

plates were inoculated in 200 ml of Todd-Hewitt broth and incubated overnight

in an aerobic atmosphere at 37

ЊC. Cells were harvested by centrifugation, washed

with a sterile saline solution, and resuspended in 3 ml of K

2

HPO



4

(0.1 M, pH

7.0). Culture supernatants were collected and concentrated 100 times by ultra-

filtration (type YM 30 filters; Amicon Corp., Danvers, Mass.).



Evaluation of the virulence of S. suis isolates.

The virulence of the non-

Canadian isolates (except strains 735 and AR770297) was estimated by using a

mouse model already described (3). The virulence of the Canadian isolates

(except strain 0891) had already been evaluated with that model (3). Briefly,

strains were growth in Todd-Hewitt broth supplemented with inactivated bovine

serum to an optical density of 0.1 (at 540 nm), 1 ml of the suspension was injected

intraperitonealy into groups of 10 28-day-old CF1 mice, and mortality was re-

corded for 1 week. In order to detect any toxic effect of the culture supernatant,

groups of 10 mice were also injected with 100-fold-concentrated supernatants of

overnight cultures of strains 1591 and 735. To demonstrate the relevance of the

model of infection in the natural host, four virulent isolates (1591, 999, AAH4,

and JL590) and four avirulent isolates (1330, TD10, R75/S2, and 0891) were

injected into groups of three 6-week-old cross-bred pigs by the same protocol but

by the intravenous route. Pigs had previously been tested by using the Western

blot technique to detect antibodies against S. suis and were monitored twice a

day for 10 days following the experimental infection.

Production of antisera.

Adult New Zealand rabbits were injected once a week

for 4 weeks intramuscularly with a formalin-killed culture (0.5% [vol/vol] forma-

lin was added to an overnight culture in Todd-Hewitt broth) of the reference

strain. In order to obtain antisera from specific fractions of the cellular protein

profile, other rabbits were injected once a week with polyacrylamide gel bands of

128 and 135 kDa from the cellular protein profile (see below) mixed with

incomplete Freund’s adjuvant. Bands corresponding to the 128-kDa cell fraction

were collected from the processed strain 1591 culture, while the cellular fraction

bands of 135 kDa were collected from the reference strain. Monoclonal anti-

bodies raised against the 136-kDa MRP and the 110-kDa extracellular protein

(15) were kindly provided by U. Vecht (DLO-Central Veterinary Institute, Lely-

stad, The Netherlands).

Western blots.

Cells from the different S. suis strains were processed in a

French press cell (20,000 lb/in

2

, three times), treated with lysozyme (Sigma



Chemical Co., St. Louis, Mo.) (5 mg/ml) for 4 h at 37

ЊC, and centrifuged (12,500

ϫ g, 20 min). Supernatants were harvested, and the protein content was evalu-

ated by a Bradford colorimetric assay (Bio-Rad, Hercules, Calif.). This solution,

as well as the concentrated culture supernatants, was mixed with an equal volume

of solubilization buffer, boiled for 4 min, and processed in 5 and 7.5% polyacryl-

amide vertical slab gels (with a 4.5% stacking gel) as described previously (9).

Following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-

PAGE), material was transferred from the slab gel to the nitrocellulose mem-

brane by the methanol-Tris-glycine system (12). Electroblotting was done in a

Transblot apparatus (Hoefer Scientific Instruments, San Francisco, Calif.) for 18

h at 60 V. Casein (2%, wt/vol) was then used to block unreacted sites, and the

nitrocellulose membrane was incubated for 2 h with 1:200 (vol/vol) dilutions of

FIG. 1. Western blots of different S. suis capsular type 2 strains. SDS-PAGE (5.0%) was performed with culture supernatants. Protein profiles were revealed with

rabbit antiserum raised against the reference strain of serotype 2. Left, molecular mass markers (in kilodaltons). Bottom, strain identification numbers. Right, large

arrowhead, 135-kDa protein; small arrowhead, 110-kDa protein.

TABLE 2. Experimental infection of pigs with S. suis serotype

2 strains

Strain

Virulence



in mice

a

Pig


b

Clinical sign(s)



c

Pathological

finding

d

1591


HV

1

Found dead



Meningitis

2

A, F, LD, N (Eu



e

)

Meningitis



3

A, F, N


999


HV

1

A, F, LD (Eu)



Pericarditis

2



3

A, F, LA, VD (Eu)



Septicemia

AAH4


HV

1

A, F, N



2

A, F, LD (Eu)



Septicemia

3

A, F, LA, VD (Eu)



Polyarthritis

JL590


HV

1

A, F, LA



2



3

A, F, VD (Eu)



Meningitis

1330


NV

1



2

LA



3



TD10


NV

1



2



3



0891


NV

1



2

A, F



3



R75/S2


NV

1



2



3





a

See Table 1, footnote b.



b

Three pigs were injected intraveneously with 3

ϫ 10

8

CFU of each S. suis



strain (see Materials and Methods). The data represent the first of two separate

experiments, which had similar results.



c

As recorded during the 10-day experiment. A, anorexia; F, fever; LA, lame-

ness; LD, persistent lateral decubitus; N, nervous signs; VD, persistant ventral

decubitus; —, no signs.



d

Main pathological lesions.



e

Eu, animal showed persistant decubitus for more than 12 h and was eutha-

nized.

1976


QUESSY ET AL.

I

NFECT



. I

MMUN


.

the different antisera. After four washings in Tris-NaCl, sheets were incubated

with a peroxidase-labeled immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction of goat antiserum

raised against rabbit IgGs (Bio-Rad) for 60 min at a dilution of 1:5,000 in a 2%

casein in Tris-NaCl. After repeated washings, the presence of bound antigens

was visualized by reacting the nitrocellulose membrane with 0.06% 4-chloro-1-

naphthol (Sigma) in cold methanol mixed with 0.02% H

2

O

2



in Tris-HCl. Ap-

parent molecular masses were calculated by comparison with standards of known

molecular mass.

Immunization assays with the 110-kDa fraction.

The concentrated culture

supernatant of strain 1591 was processed on a polyacrylamide gel and stained

with Coomassie blue. The 110-kDa band was excised from the gel, mixed with

Freund’s incomplete adjuvant as previously described (6), and injected into a

group of 13 mice once a week for 3 weeks, with each mouse receiving approxi-

mately 30

␮g of protein at each injection. On day 21, three mice were euthanized,

and their blood was collected. The IgG response to the protein was monitored by

Western blot, and this specific antiserum was used to detect the 110-kDa protein

in the different strains. The other 10 mice were experimentally infected with the

reference strain 735 (5 mice) and strain 1591 (5 mice).



RESULTS

By using the mouse experimental model of infection, S. suis

strains were classified as highly virulent, moderately virulent,

or avirulent (Table 1). The three most virulent isolates were

strains 1591 and 999 (Canadian isolates) and JL590 (a Mexican

isolate), while four other strains were found to be avirulent

(strains 0891 and 1330 [Canada] and TD10 and R75/S2 [Unit-

ed Kingdom]). When the four avirulent strains and four viru-

lent strains, as estimated with the mouse model of infection,

were injected into pigs, all virulent strains reproduced the

disease and all avirulent strains failed to reproduce the disease

(with the exception of a transient lameness in one case and

anorexia and fever in another one) (Table 2). S. suis was

recovered from lesions of all but one of the diseased pigs. The

FIG. 2. Western blots of different S. suis capsular type 2 strains. SDS-PAGE (5.0%) was performed with culture supernatants. Protein profiles were revealed with

rabbit antiserum raised against the 135-kDa protein. Left, molecular mass markers (in kilodaltons). Bottom, strain identification numbers. Arrowhead, 135-kDa protein.

FIG. 3. Western blots of different S. suis capsular type 2 strains. SDS-PAGE (7.5%) was performed with cellular fractions. Protein profiles were revealed with rabbit

antiserum raised against the reference strain. Left, molecular mass markers (in kilodaltons). Bottom, strain identification numbers. Right, large arrowhead, 135-kDa

protein; small arrowhead, 128-kDa protein.

V

OL



. 63, 1995

VIRULENT AND AVIRULENT S. SUIS ISOLATES

1977


injection of concentrated supernatants from strains 1591 and

735 failed to induce any clinical signs in mice.

When the protein profiles of the culture supernatants were

compared, a protein of about 110 kDa was found to be present

in all moderately and highly virulent strains (except the human

isolates AR770357 and AR770297, from The Netherlands) and

to be absent in all avirulent isolates (Fig. 1). Variation in the

molecular mass of this protein was noted. Western blotting

performed with antisera of mice immunized against the 110-

kDa supernatant protein from strain 1591 recognized the dif-

ferent variants. A protein of about 135 kDa was detected in all

virulent and avirulent strains except strains 1591 and 999 (Fig.

1) and 6891. Furthermore, the rabbit antiserum produced

against the 135-kDa band did not detect any protein in the

culture supernatants of strains 1591 and 999 (Fig. 2) and 6891,

while it did in other strains.

When the cellular protein profiles of the different isolates

were compared by using Western blots and rabbit antisera, the

protein profiles of the highly and moderately virulent strains of

different origins were similar, with the exception of three Ca-

nadian isolates, strains 1591 and 999 (Fig. 3) and 6891, in which

a 135-kDa protein was not detected. The 135-kDa protein was

present in all avirulent strains tested. Western blots of the cell

protein fraction with antiserum produced against the 135-kDa

protein did not detect this protein in the cellular fractions of

strains 1591 and 999 (Fig. 4A) and 6891 but detected it in all

the other strains tested. When antiserum raised against the

128-kDa fraction was used, Western blots showed that this

antiserum could recognize the 128-kDa protein and to a lesser

extent the 135-kDa protein in all strains except strains 1591

and 999 (Fig. 4B) and 6891, in which only the 128-kDa protein

was detected.

With monoclonal antibodies raised against the 136-kDa

MRP, results were similar to those with polyclonal antibodies

raised against the 135-kDa protein. We did not detect the

136-kDa protein in the supernatants of strains 1591, 999, and

6891 even when the supernatant was 100-fold concentrated.

The monoclonal antibodies raised against the 110-kDa EF did

not recognize the 110-kDa protein of the strains used in this

study.


Immunization assays with the 110-kDa protein collected

from the culture supernatant of strain 1591 showed that this

protein induced an IgG response and protected mice against

infection with the homologous strain and even with another

virulent strain (735) (Table 3).

FIG. 4. Western blots of different S. suis capsular type 2 strains. SDS-PAGE (7.5%) was performed with cellular fractions. Protein profiles were revealed with rabbit

antiserum raised against the 135-kDa protein (A) and the 128-kDa protein (B). Left, molecular mass markers (in kilodaltons). Bottom, strain identification numbers.

Right, large arrowheads, 135-kDa protein; small arrowhead, 128-kDa protein.

TABLE 3. Protective effect of a 110-kDa protein of S. suis capsular

type 2 against experimental infection in mice

Injection

a

Challenge

strain

b

Presence of 110-kDa

band on Western

blot (no. positive

mice/no. tested)

No. sick/

no.

tested


c

No. dead/

no. tested

110-kDa protein

1591

1/5


0/5

5/6


735

0/5


0/5

PBS


1591

5/5


5/5

0/3


735

5/5


4/5

a

Mice were injected with the 110-kDa protein or phosphate-buffered saline

(PBS), each in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant.

b

3

ϫ 10



8

cells.


c

Means of two separate experiments with similar results.

1978

QUESSY ET AL.



I

NFECT


. I

MMUN


.

DISCUSSION

The identification and characterization of virulence deter-

minants can be very important for the understanding of the

pathogenesis of an infection. Vecht et al. (15) reported that

both a membrane protein of 136 kDa (MRP) with homology to

Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding protein (11) and a

110-kDa EF were virulence markers for S. suis capsular type 2

isolates. In this study, a 135-kDa protein, or a variant of about

this molecular mass, has been found to be present in the

majority of virulent isolates but also in avirulent isolates. On

the other hand, an EF of about 110 kDa has been found to be

present in all virulent strains, with the exception of two human

isolates, and absent in the avirulent isolates. However, the

110-kDa protein found in this study was antigenically different

from the EF previously reported (15), as shown by the use of

monoclonal antibodies. Considerable genetic diversity has

been found among isolates of the same S. suis serotype (5), and

it is thus possible that phenotypic variants of the 110-kDa

protein might exist. We are currently investigating the related-

ness of these two proteins. Variability in the molecular mass of

the 110-kDa protein was found in this study. The use of specific

antisera showed that these proteins were related. The fact that

strains 1591 and AAH4, with 110-kDa proteins showing vari-

ation in molecular mass, both produced disease in pigs tends to

show that both forms of the 110-kDa protein found as a viru-

lence marker in this study can be recovered from virulent

strains. The possible role of this protein is not yet known, but

the fact that mice injected with concentrated supernatant did

not show any clinical signs would indicate that it is not by direct

activity that this protein would play a role in the infection.

By using a rabbit antiserum raised against the reference

strain, the 135-kDa protein was not detected in two highly

virulent Canadian strains. However, in those two strains, a

128-kDa protein was present, and the use of antiserum pro-

duced against that protein revealed the presence of cross-

reactivity with the 135-kDa band. This suggests that these pro-

teins could be antigenically related to one another. However,

the 135-kDa fraction was not detected in the cellular fractions

or in the culture supernatants of these two highly virulent

strains by using a 135-kDa-specific antiserum or an antiserum

raised against the whole bacterial cell. The existence of highly

virulent strains that do not possess the 135-kDa protein raised

some questions about the role of this protein in S. suis infec-

tions.


Differences in the virulence of S. suis strains in the experi-

mental model of infection (3, 8, 17) as well as in the natural

host (13) have been noted. The TD10 and R75/S2 isolates were

previously shown to possess a low level of virulence (6) and

were found to be avirulent in mice in the present study. In

reproducing the disease in the natural host, some authors (15)

had to use preinfection with Bordetella spp. even for strains

reported to be virulent. Experiments carried out with pigs in

the present study have confirmed the presence of differences in

the virulence of strains; they have also demonstrated the value

of the mouse experimental model used (3). Finally, in accor-

dance with the results of Iglesias et al. (7), it has been shown

that highly virulent isolates could experimentally produce the

disease in the natural host without the need for a preinfection.

Successful passive immunizations in mice with rabbit anti-

sera directed against cell wall protein have been reported (4,

6). The active immunization experiment reported here with a

110-kDa culture supernatant protein in mice showed that this

protein could induce an IgG response and adequately protect

against experimental infection with virulent homologous and

heterologous S. suis strains. Other experiments with the natu-

ral host are needed to confirm the protective potential of this

fraction, but the 110-kDa protein might eventually be a good

candidate for a subunit vaccine.



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We thank Rene

´e Le

´tourneau for her excellent technical assistance.



Sylvain Quessy was the recipient of a doctoral award from the Fonds

pour la Formation de Chercheurs et l’aide a

` la Recherche. This work

was supported in part by grants from the Conseil des Recherches en

Pe

ˆche et en Agro-Alimentaire du Que



´bec to J.D.D. (no. 3503) and

from the Conseil de Recherches en Sciences Naturelles et en Ge

´nie du

Canada to R.H. (no. 2638).



REFERENCES

1. Alexander, T. J. L. 1992. Streptococcus suis: an update. Pig Vet. Soc. Proc.



21:

50–60.


2. Arends, J. P., and H. C. Zanen. 1988. Meningitis caused by Streptococcus suis

in humans. Rev. Infect. Dis. 10:131–137.

3. Beaudoin, M., R. Higgins, J. Harel, and M. Gottschalk. 1992. Studies on a

murine model for evaluation of virulence of Streptococcus suis capsular type

2 isolates. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 99:111–116.

4. Gottschalk, M., R. Higgins, M. Jacques, and D. Dubreuil. 1992. Production

and characterization of two Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 mutants. Vet.

Microbiol. 30:59–71.

5. Hampson, D. J., D. J. Trott, L. Clarke, C. G. Mwaniki, and I. D. Robertson.

1993. Population structure of Australian isolates of Streptococcus suis. J.

Clin. Microbiol. 31:2895–2900.

6. Holt, M. E., M. R. Enright, and T. J. L. Alexander. 1990. Protective effects

of sera raised against different fractions of Streptococcus suis type 2. J. Comp.

Pathog. 103:85–94.

7. Iglesias, J. G., M. Trujano, and J. Xu. 1992. Inoculation of pigs with Strep-

tococcus suis type 2 alone or in combination with pseudorabies virus. Am. J.

Vet. Res. 3:364–367.

8. Kataoka, Y., M. Haritani, M. Mori, M. Kishima, C. Sugimoto, M. Nakazawa,

and K. Yamamoto.

1991. Experimental infections of mice and pigs with



Streptococcus suis type 2. J. Vet. Med. Sci. 53:1043–1049.

9. Laemmli, U. K. 1970. Cleavage of structural proteins during the assembly of

the head of bacteriophage T4. Nature (London) 227:680–685.

10. Smith, H. 1988. The development of studies on the determinants of bacterial

pathogenicity. J. Comp. Pathog. 98:253–273.

11. Smith, H. E., U. Vecht, A. L. J. Gielkens, and M. A. Smits. 1992. Cloning and

nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the 136-kilodalton surface protein

(muramidase-released protein) of Streptococcus suis type 2. Infect. Immun.



60:

2361–2367.

12. Towbin, H., T. Staehelin, and J. Gordon. 1979. Electrophoretic transfer of

proteins from polyacrylamide gels to nitrocellulose sheets: procedure and

some applications. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76:4350–4354.

13. Vecht, U., J. P. Arends, E. J. van der Molen, and L. A. G. van Leengoed. 1989.

Differences in virulence between two strains of Streptococcus suis type II

after experimentally induced infection of new born germ-free pigs. Am. J.

Vet. Res. 50:1037–1043.

14. Vecht, U., H. J. Wisselink, J. Anakotta, and H. E. Smith. 1993. Discrimina-

tion between virulent and non-virulent Streptococcus suis type 2 strains by

enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Vet. Microbiol. 34:71–82.

15. Vecht, U., H. J. Wisselink, M. L. Jellema, and H. E. Smith. 1991. Identifi-

cation of two proteins associated with virulence of Streptococcus suis type 2.

Infect. Immun. 59:3156–3162.

16. Williams, A. E. 1990. Relationship between intracellular survival in macro-

phages and pathogenicity of Streptococcus suis type 2 isolates. Microb.

Pathog. 8:189–196.

17. Williams, A. E., W. F. Blakemore, and T. J. L. Alexander. 1988. A murine

model of Streptococcus suis type 2 meningitis in the pig. Res. Vet. Sci.



45:

394–399.


V

OL

. 63, 1995



VIRULENT AND AVIRULENT S. SUIS ISOLATES

1979



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə