Laboratoire de Phanérogamie, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle



Yüklə 333.29 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix04.08.2017
ölçüsü333.29 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

109

Philippe MORAT

Laboratoire de Phanérogamie, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle,

16 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris, France.

morat@mnhn.fr.



Tanguy JAFFRÉ & Jean-Marie VEILLON

Laboratoire de Botanique et Écologie Appliquées, I.R.D.,

BP A5, Nouméa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

tanguy.jaffre@noumea.ird.nc



The flora of New Caledonia’s calcareous substrates

ABSTRACT

Calcareous substrates occupy c. 3,800 km

2

in New Caledonia (incl. 1,990 km



2

in the Loyalty Islands) and are of various age and origin. A total of 488 spp.

(16.1% of the total indigenous seed plants) grow on these substrates, 39.7%

of which are endemic, far below the 76,9% level of the total flora. Among

these, 401 spp. are merely tolerant of calcium, with a wide enough ecological

amplitude to occupy other substrates, including 200 spp. that also grow on

otherwise highly selective ultramafic soils. Only a core of 87 spp. are

restricted to calcareous substrates and can truly be called calciphilous. They

grow mainly in sclerophyllous and dense forests. The affinities and origins of

this flora are analyzed and show stronger links with Australia and Malesia, a

result largely similar to those obtained for the floras as a whole. Many

threatened taxa are part of this flora, and require special measures to ensure

their protection.

RÉSUMÉ

La flore des substrats calcaires de la Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Les substrats calcaires d’âge et d’origine diverses occupent en Nouvelle-

Calédonie une surface d’environ 3800 km

2

dont 1 990 aux îles Loyauté. Au



total, 488 espèces (16,1 % de la flore phanérogamique) croissent sur ces sub-

strats avec un endémisme spécifique de 39,7 % nettement moins élevé que

celui de la flore globale (76,9 %). Parmi ces espèces, 401 sont de large ampli-

tude écologique et suffisamment tolérantes pour supporter d’autres types de

substrats, dont 200 se retrouvent sur des sols issus de roches ultramafiques de

composition chimique pourtant très sélective. Seul un lot de 87 espèces stric-

tement inféodées au calcaire mérite d’être appelées calciphiles ; elles poussent

essentiellement en forêts sclérophylles ou en forêts denses humides. Les affini-

tés et les origines de cette flore sont discutées et montrent des liens plus

ADANSONIA, sér. 3  •  2001  •  23 (1) : 109-127

© Publications Scientifiques du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris.

KEY WORDS

calcareous substrates,

flora,

New Caledonia.



INTRODUCTION

The range of rock types in New Caledonia is,

along with its long isolation (separated from

Australia since the end of the Cretaceous, some

65 million years ago), one of the fundamental

causes of the exceptional richness of the territory’s

flora (3,021 native species of flowering plants), as

well as its uniqueness (76,9% of those species

endemic), and all this despite the small size of

the territory (19,100 sq. km, of which the

main island of New Caledonia itself comprises

16,900 sq. km) (M

ORAT

et al. 1981).



Although the role of certain substrates, such as

ultramafics,  in  influencing  the  uniqueness  and

distribution  of  the  New  Caledonian  flora  and

vegetation types has been much studied (M

ORAT

et al. 1984, 1986; J



AFFRÉ

1976, 1980; J

AFFRÉ

et al.


1984), that of the calcareous rocks is so far little

understood.



MATERIAL AND METHODS

Calcareous substrates outcrop in various places

in the territory (Fig. 1) and cover some 3,800 sq.

km., of which nearly 2,000 sq. km are in the

Loyalty Islands and on the Ile des Pins. They can

be divided into two major categories: those derived

from coral reefs and those of sedimentary origin

(P

ARIS



1981a, 1981b). The latter are of diverse

ages and have varying appearances. The oldest,

dating from the Paleocene to the Lower Eocene,

occur in the Hienghène and Koumac areas as well

as on the west coast as far south as Bourail; in some

places they are found as limestone pavement (karst

lapiazé) (Fig. 2). Slightly younger calcareous sub-

strates (Middle to Upper Eocene) occur sporadi-

cally along the west coast, between  Poum  and

Nouméa  (Nouméa-Boulouparis valley, Baie de

St. Vincent, Poya), and in the centre of the main

island (Table Unio, Col des Roussettes) as calcified

flysh, or they are associated with siliceous rocks

(phtanites). In the Népoui area they are found in

conglomerates dating from the Miocene.

In certain places, calcareous rocks have been

covered over by alluvial deposits derived from older

ultramafic rocks (Népoui, Pindaï, Pouembout for-

est): as a consequence they are very magnesium-

rich. In the majority of cases, however, the

characteristic features caused by the incorporation

of the ultramafic material do not over-ride those of

the underlying calcareous substrates, which pro-

duce soils rich in phosphorus and calcium.

Those of coral reef origin (Fig. 3) occur in the

Loyalty Islands (including Walpole), the Ile des

Pins and along the coastal strip in the south-east

of the main island. They are of Miocene origin

and emerged in the Quaternary.

Only a detailed study of the flora growing on cal-

careous soils, and particularly an analysis of the dis-

tribution of its species on all the other substrates

found in the territory, can reveal whether there exists

in New Caledonia a truly obligate calciphilous flora

as found elsewhere (e.g. Madagascar), or whether it

is a flora merely tolerant of calcium.

For this study, only indigenous species are taken

into consideration. The others, both naturalized

or subspontaneous, being by definition alien (and

whose ecology may be different in their native

habitats), cannot, logically, belong to the indige-

nous assemblage of New Caledonian calcicolous

plants. So that the results can be compared with

those from earlier work (M

ORAT

et al. 1984,



1986, 1994; J

AFFRÉ


et al. 1987) relating to vegeta-

tion types on other geological substrates (ultra-

mafic rocks), only seed-plants are considered here.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

1. Flora of calcareous substrates

As defined here, the indigenous seed-plant flora

growing  on  calcareous  substrates  comprises 

Morat Ph., Jaffré T. & Veillon J.-M.

110

ADANSONIA, sér. 3 •  2001  •  23 (1)



MOTS CLÉS

substrats calcaires,

flore,

Nouvelle-Calédonie.



marqués avec l’Australie et la Malésie, presque similaires à ceux déjà obtenus

pour l’ensemble de la flore néo-calédonienne. De nombreux taxons menacés

nécessitant des mesures spéciales de protection sont présents dans cette flore

calciphile.



488 species, representing 311 genera in 97 families

(Table 1). Comparison with the entire indigenous

flora shows that the flora of calcareous substrates is

relatively poor, comprising only 16.1% of the total,

and has a lower level of endemism, with only 39.7%

of its species restricted to the territory, compared

with 76.9% of the entire flora.

This relative paucity could be due in part to

the smaller area occupied by these substrates,

about 3,800 sq. km, and partly to human inter-

ference, which has considerably degraded and

reduced the original vegetation, as well as to the

currently incomplete state of the floristic inven-

tory of the vegetation types that occur on calcare-

ous rocks. When compared with the entire New

Caledonian flora, that of calcareous areas seems,

on the other hand, to be more diversified at the

family and generic levels, rather than at the level

of species. Thus 43% of the genera and 59% of

the families, compared with just 16.1 % of the

species represented in the New Caledonian flora,

are found on these substrates.

A single family (Euphorbiaceae) has 36 species,

although the number decreases rapidly (Table 2):

the thirteenth family (Compositae), for example,

has only ten. At the family level, there are certain

gaps that are worth pointing out. Most of the

families of gymnosperms (with the exception of

one species each of Cycas and Araucaria), all

the endemic families (with the exception of



Phelline comosa) and several families, primitive

( W i n t e r a c e a e ,   M o n i m i a c e a e )   a n d   n o t

(Epacridaceae, Cunoniaceae), are absent from

calcareous substrates. Moreover, certain families

very commonly occurring elsewhere [Liliaceae,

Orchidaceae, Palmae, Pandanaceae, Asclepiadaceae,

Myrtaceae (especially Myrtoideae), Cyperaceae,

Dilleniaceae, Flacourtiaceae and even Capparaceae]

Flora of New Caledonia’s calcareous substrates

111


ADANSONIA, sér. 3  •  2001  •  23 (1)

Miocene emerged 

in quaternary

Lower Miocene

Paleocene to upper Eocene

Loyalty Islands

22°

166°


0

50 km


Ile des Pins

Col des Roussettes

Table Unio

Hienghène

Poum

Koumac


Pouembout

Pindaï


Népoui

Poya


Bourail

Boulouparis

Baie de St. Vincent

Nouméa


Fig. 1. — Limestone substrate in New Caledonia (adapted from P

ARIS


1981).

are very poorly represented on this type of sub-

strate.


In view of the above mentioned diversification

at the generic level (Table 3), it is not surprising

that few genera are rich in species. The largest

genus (Diospyros) has only 11 species here, against

29 for the total flora, while the next five genera

(OxeraAustromyrtusEuphorbia, Arytera and



Cupaniopsis) have only five species each against 5,

22, 26, 7 and 30 species respectively for these

genera in New Caledonia as a whole. Curiously

the five known species of New Caledonian



Euphorbia are all found on calcareous substrate.

2. Vegetation types

The primary vegetation types on calcareous

rocks are varied but are essentially referable to

tropical rain forest as manifest on calcareous soils

or in coastal areas (Ile des Pins, Loyalty Islands,

Hienghène, Koumac), or to sclerophyll forest,

dune or behind dune formations, and also areas

behind mangroves. But these original vegetation

types have in many cases (notably sclerophyll for-

est) suffered damage through human activity and

have as a result been replaced by secondary for-

mations (secondary forest, savanna, thickets,

weedy vegetation) in which an alien flora of cos-

mopolitan species thrives.

Species of the calcareous flora are distributed in

different primary and secondary vegetation types

(Table 4). Their distribution shows an equal

share of species between sclerophyll forest, rain

forest and secondarised vegetation (thickets,

savannas, weedy vegetation), with a high rate of

endemism for the two forest types (115 and

117 species respectively) and low endemism

(65 species) for anthropogenic vegetation, which

is scarcely surprising. However, many of the

species included in these figures are also found in

several vegetation types. Therefore, to refine this

analysis it is preferable to indicate which of the

species mentioned are strictly confined to each

vegetation type (Table 5). If the results show us

nearly an equal share of species between them,

Morat Ph., Jaffré T. & Veillon J.-M.

112


ADANSONIA, sér. 3 •  2001  •  23 (1)

T

ABLE



1. — Comparison of the indigenous calcareous flora with the entire indigenous phanerogamic flora.

Species

Genera

Families

Number

Endemic

%

Number

Endemic

%

Number

Endemic

%

Entire flora

3,021

2,326


76.9

723


98

13.5


165

5

3



Calcareous flora

488


194

39.7


311

10

3



97

1

< 1

%

16.1


43

59

T



ABLE

2. — Largest families in the calcareous flora.



Family

Number of species

Euphorbiaceae

36

Gramineae



33

Leguminosae

28

Myrtaceae



22

Sapindaceae

22

Apocynaceae



19

Rubiaceae

19

Cyperaceae



17

Convolvulaceae

14

Rutaceae


12

Ebenaceae

11

Moraceae


11

Compositae

10

T

ABLE



3. — Largest genera in the calcareous flora.

Genus

Number of species

Diospyros

11

Phyllanthus

9

Ficus

8

Syzygium

8

Myoporum

7

Ipomoea

6

Euphorbia

5

Oxera

5

Austromyrtus

5

Arytera

5

Cupaniopsis

5


the preponderance of endemic calcareous species

in rain forest (52), followed by sclerophyll forest

(34), which represents a significative level of

endemism, is unambiguous.



3. Calciphilous flora

The 488 species so far counted in the calcare-

ous flora are by definition tolerant of calcium.

The majority (401) have a rather broad ecological

amplitude in that (Table 6) they are also found on

other substrates (UC, CA, UCA), where perhaps

they originated. They include 200 species growing

on ultramafic soils (UC, UCA), which sometimes

overlie limestone. Only a core of 87 species repre-

senting 70 genera in 38 families can truly be

called calciphilous in that they are found nowhere

but on calcareous substrates.

The endemism in this group is shown in

Table 7. Of the 87 calciphilous species, 42 are

endemic and include (Table 8) some outstanding

taxa such as:



— Cyrtandra mareensis (Gesneriaceae), which

is the only New Caledonian representative of a

widespread Pacific genus;

Flora of New Caledonia’s calcareous substrates

113

ADANSONIA, sér. 3  •  2001  •  23 (1)



Fig. 2. — Limestone pavement: Koumac.

Fig. 3. — Calcareous substrate derived from coral reefs: Ile des Pins.



— Lepturopetium kuniense (Gramineae), a rare

species typical of raised coral reefs and belonging

to a bispecific Pacific genus described from New

Caledonia but with a very disjunct distribution

reaching from the Marshall Islands in the North

East to Cocos Island west of Australia in the

Indian Ocean;

— Lipochaeta lifuana (Compositae) whose

20 congeners are restricted to Hawaii;



— Cyphophoenix nucele, the only endemic New

Caledonian species of palm occurring outside of

the Grande Terre.

Of the 70 genera (Table 7) represented on cal-

careous substrates, only four are endemic:

CyphophoenixPodonepheliumLeptostylis and

Acropogon. Of the non-endemic genera, however

some have a very restricted distribution, limited

to one or two phytogeographical areas: outside

New Caledonia, Lipochaeta is only found in

Hawaii, Cyclophyllum in Vanuatu and Fiji, and

Lepturopetium in the northern tropical Pacific

and Malesia. The affinities of the calcareous flora

must be sought from the 87 calciphilous species.

As in similar works on other substrates, it is the

genus (here 70 in number, four endemic) which

is used to assess affinities. By analysing the

70 genera shared by New Caledonia and one of

the other phytogeographic areas considered

(previously defined by M

ORAT


et al. 1984) and

then two, three, four, five and six territories,

respectively, we see that only 13 of them have a

distribution restricted to 1, 2, 4, 5 or 6 phytogeo-

graphical areas outside New Caledonia (Table 9).

All the others (58 in total) have a wide distribu-

tion: pan-Pacific, palaeotropical, or pantropical

or even cosmopolitan!

By assigning to each of the different territories

a coefficient proportional to the number of gen-

era common to that territory and New Caledonia

and inversely proportional to the total number of

territories in which each of the genera occurs

— as in earlier similar works (M

ORAT

et al.


1986; J

AFFRÉ


et al. 1993; M

ORAT


1993) — the

strongest affinities appear to be with Australia

and Malesia (Table 10), which clearly dominate

(with coefficients respectively of 2.56 and 2.27),

a  finding  which  is  congruent  with  results

obtained for the flora as a whole. Very surprising

is the appearance of the northern tropical Pacific

(including Hawaii) in third position, even above

Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands, not to speak

Morat Ph., Jaffré T. & Veillon J.-M.

114

ADANSONIA, sér. 3 •  2001  •  23 (1)



T

ABLE


4. — Distribution of the calcareous flora (species)

according to vegetation type.



Vegetation type

Total number

Endemic

of species

species

Sclerophyll forest (L)

230

115


Tropical rain forest (F)

223


117

Dune and behind dunes (P)

150

15

Damaged and



other vegetation types (N)

258


65

T

ABLE



5. — Distribution of the calcareous flora 

strictly limited to an individual vegetation type.



Vegetation type

Total number

Endemic

of species

species

Tropical rainforest (F)

76

52

Sclerophyll forest (L)



65

34

Dunes and behind dunes (P)



74

8

Secondary and



other vegetation types (N)

74

6



T

ABLE


6. — Distribution of species 

of the calcareous flora according to substrate: 



C, species restricted to calcareous substrates; 

UC, species found on both calcareous 

and ultramafic rocks; CA, species found 

on both calcareous and other substrates 

but not on ultramafic rocksUCA, species found 

on all substrates types.

C

UC

CA

UCA

Total

Number of species

87

29

200



172

488


Endemic species

42

20



61711

94

T



ABLE

7. — The strictly calciphilous flora.



Species (C)Genera with

Families with 

at least one

at least one

calciphilous

calciphilous

species

species

Total


87

70

38



Endemic

42

4



0

of New Guinea, which is unplaced here, though

usually second or third for the floras of other sub-

strates!

4. Origin of the calciphilous flora

The results produced by this study of the com-

position and affinities of the calciphilous flora

show a notable difference from the rest of the

vegetation types on other substrates in New

Caledonia:

1. The relative paucity of endemics at all levels

(specific, but above all generic and familial);

2. The paucity of primitive taxa notably

M a g n o l i i d a e   ( s e n s u C

R O N Q U I S T

1 9 8 8 ) :

Annonaceae,  Hernandiaceae,  Lauraceae,

Piperaceae, or their absence: Amborellaceae,

Chloranthaceae, Monimiaceae, Trimeniaceae,

Winteraceae, families that are well present on

Flora of New Caledonia’s calcareous substrates

115


ADANSONIA, sér. 3  •  2001  •  23 (1)

T

ABLE



8. — Endemic calciphilous species.

Alangiaceae

Alangium sp., Veillon 7836

Mimosaceae

Serianthes lifouensis (Fosberg) Nielsen

Alangium sp., Veillon 8050

Moraceae

Ficus lifouensis Corner

Apocynaceae

Ochrosia inventorum L. Allorge

Ficus mareensis Warb.

Schefflera sp., Veillon 7874

Myrtaceae

Austromyrtus sp., Jaffré & Rigault 2990

Araliaceae

Tieghemopanax crenatus (Pancher & Sebert)

Austromyrtus sp., Veillon 6578

comb. to be established



Austromyrtus sp., Veillon 6853

Chenopodiaceae Atriplex jubata S. Moore

Austromyrtus sp., Veillon 7039

Compositae

Lipochaeta lifuana Hochr.

Syzygium koumacense J.W. Dawson

Ebenaceae

Diospyros inexplorata F. White

Syzygium pendulinum J.W. Dawson

Diospyros tridentata F. White

Каталог: sites -> default -> files -> articles -> pdf
files -> Parodontologie
files -> Бу хмао-югры
files -> Schedule b financial Contributions for Transition in the
files -> Guidance note on transferring contributions from one un agency to another for the purpose of programmatic activities
pdf -> Adansonia 37 (2), 2015 Index des nouveautés taxonomiques et nomenclaturales
pdf -> Mots clés syzygium, Myrtaceae, Indochine, Cambodge, Laos, Viêtnam, révision taxonomique, lectotypification. Key words
pdf -> RÉsumé Description de Syzygium guehoi Bosser & Florens (Myrtaceae), nouvelle espèce de l’île Maurice affine de S. cymosum (Lam.) Dc var cymosum des Mascareignes, et de la var montanum J. Guého & A. J. Scott de la Réunion. Abstract
pdf -> A new species of Syzygium (Myrtaceae) from the Kalakkad-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve in Peninsular India Madepalli Byrappa Gowdu viswanathan


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə