J. E. M. Baartman, A. J. A. M. Temme, J. M. Schoorl, L. Claessens, W. Viveen, W. van Gorp and A. Veldkamp



Yüklə 160.31 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix10.07.2017
ölçüsü160.31 Kb.

Landscape Evolution Modelling - LAPSUS 

 

J.E.M. Baartman, A.J.A.M. Temme, J.M. Schoorl, L. Claessens, W. Viveen, W. van 



Gorp and A. Veldkamp 

 

Wageningen University, Land Dynamics Group, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The 

Netherlands. E-mail: jantiene.baartman@wur.nl 

 

 



 

ABSTRACT 

Landscape  evolution  modeling  can  make  the  consequences  of  landscape  evolution 

hypotheses  explicit  and  theoretically  allows  for  their  falsification  and  improvement.  Ideally, 

landscape  evolution  models  (LEMs)  combine  the  results  of  all  relevant  landscape  forming 

processes into an ever-adapting digital landscape (e.g. DEM). These processes may act on 

different  spatial  and  temporal  scales.  LAPSUS  is  such  a  LEM.  Processes  that  have  in 

different  studies  been  included  in  LAPSUS  are  water  erosion  and  deposition,  landslide 

activity,  creep,  solifluction,  weathering,  tectonics  and  tillage.  Process  descriptions  are  as 

simple  and  generic  as  possible,  ensuring  wide  applicability.  Vegetation-effects  can  be 

included.  Interactions  between  processes  are  turn-based:  volumes  of  one  process  are 

calculated  and  used  to  update  the  DEM  before  another  process  starts.  LAPSUS  uses 

multiple flow techniques to model flows of water and sediment over the landscape. Though 

computationally  costly,  this  gives  a  more  natural  result  than  steepest  descent  methods.  In 

addition,  the  combination  of  different  processes  may  create  sinks  during  modelling.  Since 

these sinks are not spurious, the model has been adapted to deal with them in natural ways. 

This  is  crucial  for  several  purposes,  for  instance  when  studying  damming  of  valleys  by 

landslides, and subsequent infilling of the resulting lake with sediments from upstream. 

 

Keywords: Landscape Evolution Modelling, LAPSUS, soil redistribution, erosion 



 

INTRODUCTION 

 

This extended abstract is merely a review of the work undertaken and developments into the 



future with the LAPSUS model. LAPSUS is a landscape evolution model (e.g. LEM erosion 

model) that combines the results of multiple landscape forming processes into one dynamic 

landscape.  Spatial  and  temporal  extent  and  resolution  may  vary  from  slope,  catchment  to 

basins, grids from 1 to 1000 m2, timesteps of multiple events, seasons, years, decades and 

simulation periods from years to millennial. 

Interactions between processes are turn-based: volumes of one process are calculated and 

used to update the DEM before another process starts. Processes that have been included 

in LAPSUS are water erosion and deposition, landslide activity, creep, solifluction, physical 

weathering, frost weathering, tectonics and tillage (See Figure 1). 

Process  descriptions  are  as  simple  and  generic  as  possible,  ensuring  wide  applicability. 

Vegetation-effects are included to different degrees in different case studies. LAPSUS uses 

multiple flow techniques to model the flow of water and sediment over the landscape. This is 

computationally  costly,  but  yields  a  more  natural  result  than  steepest  descent  methods, 

especially when combining multiple processes over multiple timesteps. 

The combination of different processes may create sinks during modelling. Since these sinks 

are  not spurious,  the  model  has  been  adapted  to  deal  with  them  in  a  natural  way. This  is 

crucial  when  studying  damming  of  valleys  by  landslides,  and  subsequent  infilling  of  the 

resulting lake with sediments from upstream. 

 

 

TOPIC 1: PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY MODELLING



101

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

 

LAPSUS has been used for erosion and landscape evolution studies in many landscapes in 



many  countries.  LAPSUS  has  been  founded  in  the  year  2000  with  the  development, 

calibration  and  validation  of  the  LAPSUS  model  and  applications  concerning  land  use  in 

Spain and Ecuador (Schoorl et al., 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006; Schoorl and Veldkamp, 2001, 

2006). Firstly, the model has been extended in order to cover the process of landsliding in 

New Zealand and Taiwan (Claessens et al., 2005, 2006a, 2006b, 2007a, 2007b). Secondly, 

issues  of  DEM  resolution  and  the  treatment  of  sinks  and  pits  in  the  landscape  have  been 

investigated  (Temme  et  al.,  2006,  2009)  as  well  as  stretching  the  models  time  scale  to 

landscape  evolution  time  spans  in  South  Africa  (Temme  and  Veldkamp,  2009).  Thirdly, 

different applications with specific processes have been developed, for example, the model 

has been used in regional nutrient balance studies in Africa (Haileslassie et al., 2005, 2006, 

2007; Roy et al., 2004; Lesschen et al., 2005). aplying the model in desert environments of 

Israel (Buis and Veldkamp, 2008), using LAPSUS in combination with geostatistical tools and 

tillage  in  Canada  (Heuvelink  et  al,  2006),  investigating  the  faith  of  phosphor  in  the 

landscapes of the Netherlands (Sonneveld et al., 2006) and new developments concerning 

connectivity, agricultural terraces and land abandonment (Lesschen et al., 2007, 2009) and 

the processing of feedbacks between land use and soil redistribution (Claessens et al., 2009) 

 

 

Figure 1. Overview of processes incorporated within the Lapsus modelling framework (see 



also www.lapsusmodel.nl) 

 

CONCLUSIONS  

 

Landscape  evolution  modelling  allows  for  falsification  and  improvement  of  landscape 



evolution hypotheses and can make the consequences temporal and spatial explicit. Ideally, 

landscape  evolution  models  (LEMs)  combine  the  results  of  all  relevant  landscape  forming 

processes into an ever-adapting digital landscape (e.g. DEM). These processes may act and 

interact on different spatial and temporal scales. 

 

REFERENCES 

 

  Buis,  E.  and  A.  Veldkamp,  2008.  Modelling  dynamic  water  redistribution  patterns  in  arid 



catchments in the Negev Desert of Israel. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Volume 33, 

Issue 1, p. 107-122.  

  Claessens, L., Lowe, D.J., Hayward, B.W., Schaap, B.F., Schoorl, J.M., and Veldkamp, A., 2006a, 

Reconstructing  high-magnitude/low-frequency  landslide  events  based  on  soil  redistribution 

modelling and a Late-Holocene sediment record from New Zealand: Geomorphology, 74, p. 29-

49.  


ÁREA TEMÁTICA 1: MODELIZACIÓN EN GEOGRAFÍA FÍSICA

102


  Claessens,  L.,  Verburg,  P.H.,  Schoorl,  J.M.,  and  Veldkamp,  A.,  2006b,  Contribution  of 

topographical  based  landslide  hazard  Modelling  to  the  analysis  of  the  spatial  distribution  and 

ecology of Kauri (Agathis australis): Landscape Ecology 21, p. 63 - 76.  

  Claessens, L., Heuvelink, G.B.M., Schoorl, J.M., and Veldkamp, A., 2005, DEM resolution effects 

on  shallow  landslide  hazard  and  soil  redistribution  modelling.  Earth  Surface  Processes  and 

Landforms, volume 30, p. 461-477.  

  Claessens, L.,  A. Knapen, M.G. Kitutu, J. Poesen and J.A. Deckers. 2007. Modelling landslide 

hazard, soil redistribution and sediment yield of landslides on the Ugandan footslopes of Mount 

Elgon. Geomorphology Volume 90 (Issues 1-2), p 23 - 35.  

  Claessens, L., Schoorl, J.M., and Veldkamp, A., 2007, Modelling the location of shallow landslides 

and  their  effects  on  landscape  dynamics  in  large  watersheds:  an  application  for  Northern  New 

Zealand: Geomorphology, Volume 87, Issues 1-2, p 16 - 27.  

  Claessens,  L.,  J.M.  Schoorl,  P.H.  Verburg,  L.  Geraedts  and  A.  Veldkamp  2009.  Modelling 

interactions  and  feedback  mechanisms  between  land  use  change  and  landscape  processes. 



Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 129 (1-3) 157-170.  

  Haileslassie, A., Priess, J., Veldkamp, E., Teketay, D. and J.P. Lesschen, 2005. Assessment of 

soil nutrient depletion and its spatial variability on smallholders’ mixed farming systems in Ethiopia 

using partial versus full nutrient balances. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 108: p. 1 – 

16.  

  Haileslassie, A., Priess, J.A., Veldkamp, E., and J.P. Lesschen. 2006. Smallholders’ soil fertility 



management in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia: implications for nutrient stocks, balances and 

sustainability of agroecosystems. Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, 75: 135-146.  

  Haileslassie, A., Priess, J.A., Veldkamp, E. and J.P. Lesschen, 2007. Nutrient flows and balances 

at  the  field  and  farm  scale:  Exploring  effects  of  land-use  strategies  and  access  to  resources. 



Agricultural Systems 94 (2), 459-470.  

  Heuvelink,  G.B.M.,  Schoorl,  J.M.,  Veldkamp,  A.  and  D.J.  Pennock.  2006.  Space-time  Kalman 

filtering of soil redistribution. Geoderma, 133. p. 124 - 137.  

  Lesschen, J.P.,, Asiamah, R.D., Gicheru, P., Kante, S., Stoorvogel, J.J. & Smaling, E.M.A. 2005. 

Scaling  Soil  Nutrient  Balances  -  Enabling  mesoscale  approaches  for  African  realities.  FAO  

Fertilizer and Plant Nutrition Bulletin 15, FAO, Rome.  

  Lesschen,  J.P.;  Stoorvogel,  J.J.;  Smaling,  E.M.A.;  Heuvelink,  G.B.M.;  Veldkamp,  A.  ,  2007.  A 

spatially  explicit  methodology  to  quantify  soil  nutrient  balances  and  their  uncertainties  at  the 

national level Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 78 (2). - p. 111 - 131.  

  Lesschen J.P., J.M. Schoorl, L.H. Cammeraat, 2009. Modelling runoff and erosion for a semi-arid 

catchment  using  a  multi-scale approach based on hydrological connectivity.  Geomorphology, In 

Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 12 March 2009 

  Roy, R.N., R.V. Misra, J.P. Lesschen,, E.M. Smaling, 2004. Assessment of soil nutrient balances: 

Approaches and Methodologies. Fertilizer and Plant Nutrition Bulletin 14, FAO, Rome.  

  Schoorl, J.M., Boix Fayos, C., de Meijer, R.J., van der Graaf, E.R., and Veldkamp, A., 2004. The 

137Cs  technique  on  steep  Mediterranean  slopes  (Part  2):  landscape  evolution  and  model 

calibration: Catena, v. 57, p. 35-54.  

  Schoorl,  J.M.,  Veldkamp,  A.,  and  Bouma,  J.,  2002,  Modelling  water  and  soil  redistribution  in  a 

dynamic landscape context: Soil.Sci.Soc.Am.J., v. 66, p. 1610-1619.  

  Schoorl, J.M., and Veldkamp, A., 2001, Linking land use and landscape process modelling: a case 

study for the Alora region (South Spain): Agric.Ecosyst.Environ., v. 85, p. 281-292.  

TOPIC 1: PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY MODELLING

103


  Schoorl,  J.M.,  Sonneveld,  M.P.W.,  and  Veldkamp,  A.,  2000,  Three-dimensional  landscape 

process modelling: the effect of DEM resolution: Earth Surf.Proc.Landforms, v. 25, p. 1025-1034. 

  Schoorl,  J.M.,  L.  Claessens,  M.  Lopez  Ulloa,  G.H.J.  de  Koning  &  A.  Veldkamp,  2006. 

Geomorphological Analysis and Scenario Modelling in the Noboa – Pajan Area, Manabi Province, 

Ecuador. Zeitschrift Fur Geomorfologie, Suppl.-Vol. 145, p. 105 - 118.  

  Schoorl,  J.M.,,  and  Veldkamp,  A.,  2006,  Multi-Scale  Soil-Landscape  Process  Modeling,  in 

Grunwald, S., ed., Environmental Soil-Landscape Modeling: Geographic Information Technologies 

and Pedometrics: Boca Raton, FL, CRC press, Taylor and Francis Group, p. 417 – 435.  

  Sonneveld, M.P.W. Schoorl, J.M.,and A. Veldkamp, 2006. Evaluating The Fate Of Phosphorus In 

Apparent Homogeneous Landscapes Using a High-Resolution DEM. Geoderma 133, p. 32 - 42.  

  Temme, A.J.A.M., Schoorl, J.M., and Veldkamp, A., 2006, Algorithm for dealing with depressions 

in dynamic landscape evolution models: Comp.Geosci., 32, p. 452 - 461.  

  Temme,  A.J.A.M.,  Heuvelink,  G.B.M.,  Schoorl,  J.M.  and  Claessens,  L.  2009.  Chapter  5: 

Geostatistical  simulation  and  error  propagation  in  geomorphometry.  In:  Geomorphometry: 

Concepts,  Software,  Applications.  Eds:  Hengl,  T.,  Reuter,  H.I.,  Elsevier,  (Developments  in  Soil 

Science 33) - p. 121 - 140.  

  Temme,  A.J.A.M.,  Veldkamp,  A.  2009.  Multi-process  Late  Quaternary  landscape  evolution 

modelling reveals lags in climate response over small spatial scales. Earth Surface Processes and 

Landforms 34 (4), p. 573 - 589. 



ÁREA TEMÁTICA 1: MODELIZACIÓN EN GEOGRAFÍA FÍSICA

104



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə