Issn 2278-4136 issn



Yüklə 1.09 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix15.08.2017
ölçüsü1.09 Mb.

 

~ 178 ~ 


Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry 2014; 3 (1): 178-182

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

ISSN 2278-4136 

ISSN 2349-8234 

 

JPP 2014; 3 (1): 178-182 



 

Received: 24-04-2014 

 

Accepted: 06-05-2014 



 

Sanal C Viswanath 

Forest Ecology and Biodiversity 

Conservation Division 

Kerala Forest Research Institute, 

Peechi 680 653, Kerala, India 

 

Sreekumar, V.B. 



Forest Ecology and Biodiversity 

Conservation Division 

Kerala Forest Research Institute, 

Peechi 680 653, Kerala, India

 

 

Sujanapal, P 

Sustainable Forest Management 

Division,

 

Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi 

680 653, Kerala, India 

 

Suganthasakthivel, R. 

Forest Ecology and Biodiversity 

Conservation Division 

Kerala Forest Research Institute, 

Peechi 680 653, Kerala, India 

 

Sreejith K.A. 

Forest Ecology and Biodiversity 

Conservation Division 

Kerala Forest Research Institute, 

Peechi 680 653, Kerala, India 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correspondence 

Sreekumar, V.B. 

Forest Ecology and Biodiversity 

Conservation Division 

Kerala Forest Research Institute, 

Peechi 680 653, Kerala, India 

Email: sreekumar@kfri.res.in 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

Eugenia singampattiana Beddome: a critically 

endangered medicinal tree from Southern Western 

Ghats, India 

 

Sanal C Viswanath, Sreekumar, V.B., Sujanapal, P., Suganthasakthivel, R. and 

Sreejith K.A. 

 

 



ABSTRACT

 

Eugenia  singampattiana  Beddome  is  an  important  medicinal  plant  commonly  known  as  Jungle  Guava, 

restricted  to  Agasthyamalai  phyto-geographical  region,  in  Southern  Western  Ghats.  This  species  is 

commonly  used  in  the  treatment  of  asthma,  giddiness,  body  pain,  rheumatism  and  also  good  source  of 

alkaloids,  coumarins  and  catechins.  Due  to  habitat  loss  and  over  exploitation,  natural  population  of  the 

species  is  depleting  at  an  alarming  rate  and  is  already  enlisted  as  critically  endangered  by  IUCN.  The 

present review is focused on distribution, population status, silvicultural aspects and medicinal importance 

of  Eugenia  singampattiana.  Since  the  species  is  having  high  utilization  potential  with  restricted 

distribution, large scale restoration and in situ conservation at species level is an urgent need.

 

 



Keywords: Eugenia singampattiana, Medicinal tree, Singampatti Hills, Critically Endangered. Southern 

Western Ghats. 

 

 

1. Introduction 



Eugenia  singampattiana  Beddome  (Myrtaceae)  also  known  as  “Jungle  Guava”  or 

Kaattukorandi” (Tamil, Tamil Nadu) is a critically endangered small evergreen medicinal tree 

(Fig. 1), found at the tail end of Southern Western Ghats regions of Tamil Nadu 

[1, 18, 24,  27, 28,  33, 

36, 42]



 



Fig 1: Eugenia singampattiana Bedd. Plant with mature fruits 

 

Lushington  called  this  plant  as  ‘Eugene  Myrtle  Singampatty  hills  in  Tinnelvelly’;  the  present 



Tirunelveli  District  of  Tamil  Nadu,  India

  [13,  27,  30,  32,  33,  44] 

which

 

is  the  type  locality  of  this 



species.  Kannnikkar  is  a  group  of  tribes  residing  in  these  forest  areas  are  well  aware  of  the 

traditional knowledge on the species. After the type collection by Beddome  between 1864 and 

1874 

[5,  13]

 the plant was rediscovered in 1986  and 1987 by  Daniel  from  Papanasam hills near 

Hope Lake 

[15]

.  


 

~ 179 ~ 


Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

 

This  species  is  categorized  as  endangered  or  possibly  extinct  by 



Botanical  Survey  of  India 

[30,  34)]

.  Subsequently  this  species  was 

located  in  Checkkalamoode,  on  the  way  to  Kannikatti  from 

Tulukka  mottai 



[15]

  and river  bank,  Inchikuli,  Kannikatti  and  from 

Ullar  to  Inchikuli 

[15]

.  Sarcar  et  al., 



[47,  48]

  conducted  a  detailed 

inventory  of  this  species  as  a  part  of  developing  strategies  for  the 

restoration  of  this  species  and  he  could  collect  the  species  with 

flower  and  ripe  fruits  on  the  western  side  of  Hope  lake  between 

Kavathalai  Ar  and  Tulukka  mottai  along  the  road  (lower  side) 

leading  to  Kannikatti  from  Kariar  in  September  1999  and  again 

from  the  southern  side  of  Hope  lake  near  Banathirtham  during 

February and July 2000. Sarcar

 [46]

 have also collected various parts 

of  the species and analysed  phytogeographic  parameters related  to 

growth from places adjacent to the Banathirtham waterfalls, Kariar 

to Kannikatti forest rest house,  Inchikuli, Pambar and Mallar river 

bank  during  1999–2001. 

 

In  2013,  IUCN  enlisted  this  species  as 



Critically Endangered A1c ver 2.3; based on estimated, inferred or 

suspected population size reduction of ≥90% over the last 10 years 

or  three  generations,  whichever  is  the longer,  where  the  causes  of 

the  reduction  are  clearly  reversible  based  on  a  decline  in  area  of 

occupancy,  extent  of  occurrence  and/or  quality  of  habitat. 

Ecologically  this  species  prefers  evergreen  forest  area  to  semi-

evergreen forest areas between 700 and 1500 m through a series of 

transitions from moist deciduous to evergreen form

 [48]

 



1.1 Taxonomical Classification 

 

 

Kingdom 


: Plantae 

Division  

: Magnoliophyta 

Class                  : Magnoliopsida 

Order 

 

: Myrtales 



Family   

: Myrtaceae 

Genus   

: Eugenia 

Species               : Eugenia singampattiana Bedd. 

 

2. Description 

Dense  small  evergreen  tree,  branchlets  terete,  glabrous,  6-9  m 

height;  bark  grey  or  brownish  coloured,  smooth,  soft,  ferrate; 

leaves  opposite,  decussate,  dark  green  above,  light  beneath,  5-

12×2.5-8  cm,  ovate  or  elliptic-oblong,  nerves  13-15  pairs,  nerves 

and  intra-marginal  nerve  prominent,  mid-nerve  prominent  below, 

glabrous,  base cordate or rounded at base, margin entire, obtuse or 

acuminate at apex; petiole very short. Inflorescence moderate sized 

cymes,  terminal;  bracteoles  2,  cymes  terminal  in  short  racemes; 

bracts and bracteoles pubescent, 0.8-1 cm long; pedicels 1 cm long. 

Flowers  bisexual,  white,  usually  persistent,  calyx  tube  nearly 

globose,  sepals  4,  oval-orbicular,  not  produced  beyond  the  ovary, 

the  limb  of  4  or  5,  persistent  lobes,  stamens  disc  broad  or  absent, 

calyx  tube  3  mm  long,  lobes  4,  sub-orbicular,  persistent.  Petals  4, 

bracts  and  bracteoles  pubescent,  distinct,  glandular,  12  mm  long, 

ovate, inconspicuously  dotted and  prominently nerved,  disc small, 

stamens numerous, distinct, erect or incurved; filaments  1-1.5  mm 

long,  2-celled  ovary,  subglobose, numerous  ovules, the  cells often 

again  divided  by  the  false  partitions,  style  8  mm  long,  ovules 

several in each cell, stigma simple slender. Fruit berry, spherical or 

subglobose  to  globose,  1.5–1.75  cm  diameter,  yellowish  orange-

crimson  red  coloured.  Seeds  planoconvex,  1.5-1.5×1.3  cm  stony 

black, thick cotyledons. 

 

Flowering & Fruiting: February- October.  



 

3. Distribution 

This tree is endemic to the tail end  of  Southern Western  Ghats of 

Peninsular  India

  [28,  45,  48]

.  Beddome  described  this  species  during 

1864-1874 from Singampatti Hills 



[13, 32]

 of Tamil Nadu and Daniel 

collected  this  species  from  Papanasam  Hills  in  Tirunelveli. 

[15,  28]

Rajendran  located  this  species  from  Chekkalamoodu,  Tamil  Nadu 



[15]

. Thereafter, Gopalan collected it from the Ambalam river bank, 

Inchikuli,  Kannikatti  &  Ullar,  Tamil  Nadu 

[15]

.  Sarcar  and  others 

identified  distribution  zones  in  Western  Hill  Lake  in  between 

Kavathalai  Ar  and  Tulukka  mottai  along  the  road  (lower  side) 

leading  to  Kannikatti  from  Kariar 

[28,  49]

  and  places  near  to 

Banathirtham waterfalls, Inchikuli, Pambar & Mallar river bank  of 

Tamil  Nadu 



[15,  28,  49]

.  The  distribution  range  of  the  species  is 

located  between  lat.  8°33′N  to  8°42′46″N  and  between  long. 

77°17′55″E to 77°21′37″E

 [48]

 (Map 1). Most of natural distribution 

points  of  E.  singampattiana  are  adjacent  areas  with  a  narrow 

geographic  range  having  small  population  size  and  if  the  existing 

habitats are modified this species will be vulnerable to extinction.  

 

4. Ethanopharmacology 



E.  singampattiana  is  known  to  the  Kanikkars,  inhabitants  of  the 

Agasthyamalai Biosphere Reserve as “Kattukorandi”; they use this 

plant  to  get  relief  from  toothache,  digestive  problems,  asthma, 

giddiness,  body  pain,  rheumatism,  gastric  complaints  and  also  as 

mouth  freshener 

[2,  4,  6,  25,  32,  36,  43,  48,  54,  57]

.  A  paste  prepared  from 

equal  quantities  of  leaves  and  flowers  are  consumed  to  cure  body 

pain and throat  pain and  tender  fruits are  consumed to  relief  from 

leg  sores  and  rheumatism 

[24,  31,  36,  48]

.  A  paste  is  being  prepared 

from  equal  quantities  of  stems,  leaves  and  flowers  are  consumed 

with palm sugar to get relief from gastric complaints

 [19, 31, 36, 48]

 



5. Phytochemical Activity 

Compounds  like  flavanol  glycosides,  polyphenols,  ellagic  acids, 

gallic  acids  were  reported  earlier  from  various  species  of  Eugenia 

[16,  29,  35,  37,  38,  51,  55]

 and  GC-MS analysis of leaves have proved the 

presence  of  eighteen  compounds 

[16,  29,  35,  37,  38,  51,  55]

.  The  major 

identified  compound  are  5-Methoxy-2,2,6-trimethyl-1(3-methyl-

buta-1,3-dienyl)-7-oxa-bicyclo  heptanes  followed  by  1,2,3-

Benzenetriol  (Pyrogallol),  α-caryophyllene,  2-propen-1-one,  1-

(2,6-dihydroxy-4-ethoxyphenyl)3-phenyl,  n-Hexadecanoic  acid, 

9,12-Octadeca 

dienoic 


acid, 

2-pentanone, 

1-(2,4,6-

trihydroxyphenyl)α-  Amyrin  (β-amyrin),  Squalene  and  limonene 



[40]

.  The  other  compounds  like  alkaloids,  coumarins,  catechins, 

glycosides,  flavanoids,  phenols,  steroids,  saponins,  tannins, 

terpenes, sugars, xanthoproteins, derivatives and fixed oils are also 

reported  from  E.  singampattiana

  [16,  29,  35,  37,  51,  55]

.  Several  studies 

have  proved  the  significant  anti-hyperproteinemia,  anti-diabetic, 

anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects of 

this species



 [21, 22, 25, 46, 52]

. Flavonoids are also reported to regenerate 

the damaged pancreatic beta cells 

[5, 8, 11] 

and phenols have found to 

be effective anti-hyperglycemic agents 

[8]

.

 



 

6. Antimicrobial and Antifungal Activity 

The  increase  of  antibiotic  resistance  of  microorganism  to 

conventional  drugs  has  necessitated  the  search  for  new  efficient 

and  cost  effective  ways  for  the  control  of  infectious  diseases,  the 

result  of  different  studies  provide  evidence  that  some  medicinal 

plants might indeed be a potential source of new antibacterial agent 

including this species

 [17, 25, 38,  40, 47,  53, 56]

. The antimicrobial activity 

of E. singampattiana was evaluated on bacterial and fungal strains 

which can be used to discover  bioactive  natural products that may 

serve  as  leads  in  the  development  of  new  pharmaceuticals  for 

therapeutic  needs

  [9,  10,  12,  20,  22]

.  The  methanol  leaf  extract  showed 

great  activity  against  different  types  of  fungi  like  Candida 



albicansPenicillium notatumAspergillus flavusAspergillus niger 

etc.


[41, 53]

.


 

~ 180 ~ 


Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

 

 



 

 

7. Antitumor and Anticancer Effect 

Several  studies  in  E.  floccosa  and  E.  singampattiana  exhibit 

significant  antitumor  effects 



[11, 

22]

  with  compounds  like 

Octadecadienoic  acid,  Limonene,  Squalene  which  are  anti-

cancerous  in  nature.  Similarly  9-12,  Octadecadienoic  acid  has  the 

property  of  anti-inflammatory  and  anti-arthritic  as  reported  earlier

 

[6,  7,  9,  11]

  and  limonene  has  anti-cancerous,  anti-tumoral,  antibiotic 

and  anti-protozoal  activity

  [3,  14,  20,  21,  22,  44]

.  Squalene  possesses 

chemo-preventive  activity  against  colon  carcinogenesis 

[40]

.  β-


caryophyllene is a sesquiterpene that has anti-inflammatory activity 

[20,  21]

.  Further  investigations  into  the  pharmacological  importance 

of  E.  singampattiana  and  their  diversity  and  detailed  phyto-

chemistry  may  add  new  knowledge  to  the  traditional  systems  of 

medicine 

[11, 12, 38, 49, 50]



 



8. Silviculture and Conservation efforts.  

Most  of the researches  available  on silviculture aspects of forestry 

species  in  the  past  were  restricted  both  to  common  species  or 

commercially  important  species  and  in  the  case  of  rare  and 

threatened  species  it  is  extremely  scarce  or  lacking.  The 

conservation  of  threatened  plants  is  a  great  concern  because  it  is 

suggested  that  many  as  half  of  the  world’s  plant  species  may 

qualify as threatened with extinction under the world Conservation 

Union  (IUCN)  classification  scheme 

[41]

.  Hence  information  on 

detailed  analysis  on  population  structure,  range  of  natural  stands, 

and  standardization  of  nursery  practices  especially  in  the  case  of 

rare  plants  is  a  prerequisite  for  developing  effective  restoration 

strategies.   



E. singampattiana is a fire and drought tender shade bearer tree and 

grows well where soil moisture is ensured with good drainage. The 

species prefers yellowish brown sandy clay soil and soil parameters 

related  to  this  species  was  well  studied

  [48]

.  The  species  is  not 

readily  browsed  by  livestock  and  other  wild  herbivores.  Large 

numbers  of  shoots  are  produced;  stumps  and  also  branch  cuttings 

are  used  for  vegetative  propagation.  Being  a  shade  bearer  during 

young stage 



[47] 

the seedlings and saplings are found under shade of 

second and first-storied high forest and the species is frost-tender in 

early  stages  and  hardier  later.  E.  singampattiana  reported  to  have 

excellent  coppicing  power 

[47] 

and  number  of  seeds  per  kg  ranged 

from 556 to 857 and germination capacity were 84-87%. However, 

quantified information on natural regeneration of this species is not 

recorded  yet,  but  much  natural  regeneration  was  observed  below 

the tree shade near the streams

  [47]

. Artificial reproduction methods 

were carried out both from seed origin and by stem cuttings

  [46, 47]

Since  occurrence  of  this  species  is  strictly  restricted  to  a  narrow 



endemic  zone  of  distribution  urgent  conservation  measures  are 

required  to  prevent  from  the  imminent  danger  of  extinction.  Most 

of  the  distribution  zones  of  this  species  are  falling  within  the 

protected areas of Tamil Nadu frequent monitoring on regeneration 

dynamics  and  phenological  patterns  can  be  done  in  these  sites. 

Similarly habitat  suitability and identification  of ecological niches 

is  to  be  done  using  Ecological  niche  modelling  based  on  GPS 

surveys  throughout  the  distribution  area  which  in  turn  can 

effectively  utilized  for  identifying  potential  sites  for  restoration 

programmes.  The  data  on  seed  storage,  genetic  diversity, 

reproductive  biology, seed  dispersal, insects, and diseases is to be 

generated  at  the  earliest  for  developing  appropriate  conservation 

measures  to  protect  the  existing  known  population  of  this 

threatened species. 

 

9. Conclusion 

E. singampattiana Bedd. is a critically  endangered  medicinal tree, 

endemic to the tail end of Southern Western Ghats, and this species 

is highly restricted  to evergreen  patches  of Agasthyamalai  hills. It 

is 


proven 

as 


anticancerous, 

antitumerous, 

antioxidative, 

antimicrobial,  antifungal,  antiinflammatory,  antihyperlipidaemic 

and  antidiabetic  agents.  The  tribal  people  have  enormous 

indigenous  knowledge  on this  particular  species  which is used  for 



 

~ 181 ~ 


Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

 

food  and  medicinal  purposes  effectively.  Ex-situ  and  in-situ 



conservation  strategies  are  to  be  developed  for  this  particular 

species  by  protecting  the  existing  natural  strands  and  through 

species specific multiplication and restoration programmes. 

 

10. Acknowledgements 

The authors are grateful to the Director, KFRI for providing all the 

facilities and KSCSTE for the financial support.  

 

11. References 

1.

 



Ahmeddullah M, Nayar MP. Endemic plants of the Indian 

Region,  Vol.  I.  Peninsular  India,  Botanical  Survey  of 

India, Culcutta 1986. 

2.

 



Anonymous.  Phytochemical  investigation  of  certain 

medicinal  plants  used  in  Ayurveda.  Central  Council  for 

Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi 1990. 

3.

 



Arruda  DC,  Miguel  DC,  Yokoyama–Yasunaka  JKU, 

Katzin  AM,  Uliana  SRB.  Inhibitory  activity  of  limonene 

against  Leishmania parasites in vitro and in vivo. Biomed 

and Pharmacother 2009; 63:643-649. 

4.

 

Ayyanar  M,  Ignacimuthu  S.  Traditional  knowledge  of 



Kani tribals in Kouthalai of Tirunelveli hills, Tamil Nadu. 

J Ethnopharmacol 2005; 102:246-255. 

5.

 

Beddome  RH.  Icones  of  Plantarum  Indiae  Orientalis. 



1868-1874, 65, 273. 

6.

 



Chendurpandy  P,  Mohan  VR,  Kalidass  C.  An 

ethnobotanical  survey  of  medicinal  plants  used  by  the 

Kanikkars  tribe  of  Kanyakumari  District  of  Western 

Ghats,  Tamil  Nadu  for  the  treatment  of  skin  diseases.  J 

Herbal medicine and Toxicology 2010; 4:179-190. 

7.

 



Cragg GM, Newman DJ. Plants as a source of anti-cancer 

agents. Ethnopharmacology 2005; 100:72-79. 

8.

 

Crunkhorn  P,  Meacock  SCR.  Mediators  of  the 



inflammation induced in the rat paw by carrageenan. Br J 

Pharmacol 1971; 42:392-402. 

9.

 

Curtis  SJ,  Moritz  M,  Snodgrass  PJ.  Serum  Enzymes 



derived  from  liver  cells  fractions  and  the  response  to 

carbon  tetrachloride  intoxication  in  rats,  Gastroenterol 

1972; 84-92. 

10.


 

Feng  Q,  Kumagai  T,  Torii  Y,  Nakamura  Y,  Osawa  T, 

Uchida  K.  Anticarcinogenic  antioxidants  as  inhibitors 

against intracellular oxidative stress. Free Radic Res 2001; 

35:779-88. 

11.


 

Fenninger  LD,  Mider  GB.  Energy  and  Nitrogen 

Metabolism  in  Cancer.  Vol.  2,  In:  Advances  in  Cancer 

Research, Greenstein JP and Haddow A (Eds.), Academic 

Press Inc., New York, 1954, 229-253. 

12.


 

Ferguson  P,  Kurowska  E,  Freeman  D,  Chambers  A  and 

Koropatnick  D.  A  flavonoid  fraction  from  cranberry 

extract  inhibits  proliferation  of  human  tumor  cell  line.  J 

Nutri 2004; 134:1529-1535. 

13.


 

Gamble  JS.  Flora  of  Presidency  of  Madras,  1957  (repr. 

edn), 343. 

14.


 

Gelb  MH,  Tamonoi  F,  Yokoyama  K,  Ghomashchi  F, 

Esson  K,  Gould  MN.  The  inhibition  of  protein 

phenyltransferases  oxygenated  metabolites  of  limonene 

and perillyl alcohol. Cancer Lett 1995; 91:169-175. 

15.


 

Gopalan  R,  Henry  AN.  Endemic  Plants  of  India, 

Endemics  of  Agasthiyarmalai  Hills,  Bishen  Singh 

Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun, 2000, 178–180. 

16.

 

Gouri  SS,  Vasantha  K.  Phytochemical  screening  and 



antibacterial activity of Syzygium cumini (L.) (Myrtaceae) 

leaves  extracts.  Int  J  Pharm  Tech  Research  2010; 

2(2):1569-1573. 

17.


 

Hogland  HC.  Haematological  complications  of  cancer 

chemotherapy. Semi Oncol 1982; 95-102. 

18.


 

Jain  SK,  Rao  RR.  (Eds.).  An  assessment  of  threatened 

plants of India (Proceedings of the Seminar held at Dehra 

Dun,  September  1981),  Botanical  Survey  of  India 

(Department  of  Environment),  Botanic  Garden,  Howrah, 

1983. 


19.

 

Jeya  JG,  Benniamin  A,  Maridass  M,  Raju  G. 



Identification of essential oils composition and antifungal 

activity  of  Eugenia  singampattiana  fruits.  Pharmacology 

2009; 2:727-733. 

20.


 

Johann S, Soldi C, Lyon JP, Pizzolath MG, Resende MA. 

Antifungal  activity  of  the  amyrin  derivatives  and  in  vitro 

inhibition  of  Candida  albicans  adhesion  to  human 

epithelial  cells.  Letters  in  Applied  Microbiology  2007; 

45:148-153. 

21.

 

Kala  SMJ,  Balasubramanian  T,  Mohan  VR,  Tresina  PS. 



Phramco-chemical 

characterization 

of 

Eugenia. 

singampattiana  Bedd.  Advances  in  Bioresearch  2010; 

1(1):106-109. 

22.

 

Kala  SMJ,  Balasubramanian  T,  Tresina  PS,  Mohan  VR. 



GC-  MS  determination  of  bioactive  components  of 

Eugenia  singampattiana  Bedd.  Int  J  Chem  Tech  Res 

2011; 3(3):1534-1537. 

23.

 

Kala  SMJ,  Tresina  PS,  Mohan  VR.  Antioxidant, 



antihyperlipidaemic  and  antidiabetic  activity  of  Eugenia 

singampattiana  Bedd.  leaves  in  alloxan  induced  diabetic 

rats.  Int.  J.  Pharmacy  and  Pharmaceutical  Sciences  2012; 

4 (3):412-416. 

24.


 

Kala  SMJ,  Tresina  PS,  Mohan  VR.  Evaluation  of  anti-

inflammatory  activity  of  Eugenia  singampattiana  Bedd. 

leaf. Int J Adv Res 2013; 1(6):248-251. 

25.

 

Kala  SMJ,  Tresina  PS,  Mohan  VR.  Hepatoprotective 



effect  of  Eugenia  singampattiana  Bedd.  leaf  extract  on 

carbon  tetrachloride  induced  jaundice.  Int  J  Pharm  Sci 

Rev Res 2013; 21(1):41-45. 

26.


 

Kala SMJ, Tresina SP, Mohan VR. Antitumour activity of 



E.  flocossa  Bedd  and  E.  singampattiana  Bedd  leaves 

against Dalton ascites lymphoma in Swiss albino rats.  Int 

J Pharm Tech Research 2011; 3:1796-1800. 

27.


 

Karla S, Carretero E, Villar A. Anti-inflammatory activity 

of  leaf  extracts  of  Eugenia  jambos  in  rats.  J  Ethn 

Pharmacology 1994; 43:9-11. 

28.

 

Kone  WM,  Atindehou  KK,  Terreaux  C,  Hostettmann  K, 



Traore  D,  Dosso  M.  Traditional  medicine  in  north  Côte-

d'Ivoire screening  of  50  medicinal  plants for  antibacterial 

activity. J Ethno pharmacology 2004; 93:43-49. 

29.


 

Lalitha  RS,  Kalpanadevi  V,  Tresina  PS,  Maruthupandian 

A,  Mohan  VR.  Ethnomedicinal  plants  used  by  Kanikkars 

of  Agasthiarmalai  Biosphere  Reserve,  Western  Ghats. 

Journal of Ecobiotechnology 2011; 3(7):16-25. 

30.


 

Lushington  AW.  Vernacular  List  of  Trees,  Shrubs  and 

Woody  Climbers  in  Madras  Presidency.  Govt.  Press, 

Madras 1915; Vol. IIB, 828. 

31.

 

Maridass M, Ramesh U.  Chemosystematics evaluation  of 



Eugenia  species  based  on  molecular  marker  tools  of 

flavonoids 

constituents. 

International 

Journal 

of 


Biological Technology 2010; 1(1):107-110. 

32.


 

Mathew  K.  The  flora  of  the  Tamil  Nadu  Carnatic,  (The 

Rapinat  Herbarium,  St.  Joseph’s  College,  Tiruchirapalli), 

1983, 2154. 

33.

 

Nair  AGR,  Krishnam  S,  Ravikrishna  C,  Madhusudanan 



 

~ 182 ~ 


Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

 

KP.  New  and  rare  flavonol  glycosides  from  leaves  of 



Syzygium samarongense. Fitoterapia 1999; 70:148-151. 

34.


 

Nayar  MP,  Sastry  ARK.  Red  data  book  of  Indian  plants, 

Vol.  1,  2  &  3,  Botanical  Survey  of  India  1987;  27:283-

294. 


35.

 

Nayar MP. “Hot Spots” of endemic plants of India, Nepal 



and  Bhutan.  Tropical  Botanic  Garden  and  Research 

Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram, 1996, 252. 

36.

 

Oliveira  GF,  Furtado  NAJC,  Filho  AAS,  Martins  CHG, 



Bastos JK, Cunha WR. Antimicrobial activity of Syzygium 

cumini  (Myrtaceae)  leaves  extract.  Brazilian  Journal  of 

Microbiology 2007; 38:381-384. 

37.

 

Park  HJ,  Kim  MJ,  Ha  E,  Chung  JH.  Apoptotic  effect  of 



hesperidin  through  caspase-3  activation  in  human  colon 

cancer cells, SNU-C4. Phytomedicine 2008; 15:147-151. 

38.

 

Pavendan  P,  Rajasekaran  CS.  Effect  of  different 



concentrations  of  plant  growth  regulators  for  the 

micropropagation  of  Eugenia  singampattiana  Bedd., 

endangered tree species. Res J Bot 2011; 6(3):122-127. 

39.


 

Pavendan  P,  Rajasekaran  CS.  Evaluation  of  the 

Antimicrobial  Activity  of  Eugenia  singampattiana  Bedd. 

Endangered  medicinal  Plant  leaves  extract.  Int  J  Pharm 

Tech Research 2012; (4)1:476-480. 

40.


 

Pavendan 

P, 

Rajasekaran 



CS, 

Anand 


GV. 

Pharmacognostic  standardization  and  Physico-chemical 

evaluations of leaves of Eugenia singampattiana Bedd. an 

endangered species.  Int J Pharma and Bio Sciences 2011; 

2:236 -241. 

41.


 

Pitman  NCA,  Jorgensen  PM.  Estimating  the  size  of  the 

world’s threatened flora. Science 2002; 298:989. 

42.


 

Rajadurai  VG,  Vidhya  M,  Ramya,  Bhaskar  A.  Ethno-

medicinal  Plants  Used  by  the  Traditional  healers  of 

Pachamalai  Hills,  Tamil  Nadu,  India.  Ethno-Med  2009; 

3(1):39-41. 

43.


 

Ramesh BR, Pascal JP. Atlas of Endemics of the Western 

Ghats (India), French Institute of Pondicherry 1997; 303. 

44.


 

Recknagel  RO.  A  new  direction  in  the  study  of  carbon 

tetrachloride hepatotoxicity. Life Sci 1983; 33:401-408. 

45.


 

Samyduarai  P,  Jagatheeshkumar  S,  Aravinthan  V, 

Thangapandian  V.  Survey  of  wild  aromatic  ethano-

medicianl plants  of Velliangiri Hills in Southern Western 

Ghats of  Tamilnadu,  India.  Int J  Med Arom Plants 2012; 

2(2):229-234. 

46.

 

Sarcar 



MK. 

Nursery 


techniques 

and 


study 

of 


phytogeographic  parameters  of  E.  singampattina  in 

Papanasam  and  Singampatti  RF,  KMTR,  Tirunelveli 

2000. 

47.


 

Sarcar MK, Gopalan  R, Chelladurai V.  Floral study  from 

Kariar  to  Kannikatti  Forest  Rest  House,  Kalakad 

Mundandurai Tiger Reserve (KMTR), Tirunelveli, 1999. 

48.

 

Sarcar  MK,  Sarcar  AB,  Chelladurai  V.  Rehabilitation 



approach  for  Eugenia  singampattiana  Beddome  -  an 

endemic and critically endangered tree species of southern 

tropical evergreen forests in  India. Current Science 2006; 

91(4):472-481. 

49.

 

Schmeda-Hirschmann  G.  Flavonoids  from  Calycorectes, 



Campomanesia,  Eugenia  and  Hexachlamys  species. 

Fitoterapia 1995; 66:373-374. 

50.

 

Shankar  R.  Tribal  community  in  India  and  PGR,  In: 



Farmer’s  rights  and  plant  genetic  resources  recognition 

and reward: A dialogue. (Ed.) Swaminathan, M.S. Million 

India Limited Madras, India, 1995; 106-111. 

51.


 

Stephen  AE,  Ehiagbonare  JE.  Antimicrobial,  Nutritional 

and  phytochemical  properties  of  Perinari  excelsa  seeds. 

Int J Pharma and Bio Sciences 2011; 2(3):459 -470 

52.

 

Suky TMB, Parthiban B, Kingston C, Mohan VR, Tresina 



PS.  Hepatoprotective  and  antioxidant  effect  of  Balanites 

aegyptiaca (L.) Del against CCl

4

 induced hepatotoxicity in 



rats, Int. J. Pharmaceut. Sci Res 2011; 2:887-892. 

53.


 

Sutha  S,  Mohan  VR,  Kumaresan  S,  Murugan  C, 

Athiperumalsami  T.  Ethnomedicinal  plants  used  by  the 

tribals of  Kalakad-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve (KMTR), 

Western  Ghats,  Tamil  Nadu  for  the  treatment  of 

rheumatism.  Indian  J.  Traditional  Knowledge  2010; 

9:502-509. 

54.


 

Ugbabe  GE,  Ezeunala  MN,  Edmond  IN,  Apev  J,  Salawu 

OA.  Preliminary  phytochemical,  antimicrobial  and  acute 

toxicity  studies  of  the  stem,  bark  and  the  leaves  of  a 

cultivated  Syzygium  cumini  Linn.  (Family:  Myrtaceae)  in 

Nigeria.  African  Journal  of  Biotechnology  2010; 

9(41):6943- 6747. 

55.


 

Viswanathan MB, Prem KEH, Ramesh N. Ethnobotany of 

the  Kanis  (Kalakkad-  Mundanthurai  Tiger  Reserve  in 

Tirunelveli  District,  Tamil  Nadu,  India).  Bishen  Singh 

Mahendra Pal Singh Publishers, Dehra Dun (India.) 2006; 

87-88. 


56.

 

WHO.  WHO  traditional  medicine  strategy.  World  Health 



Organization, Geneva. WHO/ EDM/TRM/2002.1, 2002. 

57.


 

Zakaria  M.  Isolation  and  characterization  of  active 

compounds from medicinal plants. Asia Pacific Journal of 

Pharmacology 1996; 6:15-20. 



 

 

 



 

 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə