Interrelationship between phosphorus toxicity and sugar metabolism in Verticordia plumosa L



Yüklə 0.58 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü0.58 Mb.

Plant and Soil 245: 249–260, 2002.

© 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

249

Interrelationship between phosphorus toxicity and sugar metabolism in

Verticordia plumosa L

Avner Silber

1,5

, Jaacov Ben-Jaacov



2

, Alexander Ackerman

2

, Asher Bar-Tal



1

, Irit Levkovitch

1

,

Tania Matsevitz-Yosef



3

, Dvora Swartzberg

3

, Josef Riov



4

& David Granot

3

1

Institute of Soils, Water and Environmental Sciences,



2

Department of Ornamental Horticulture,

3

Institute of Field



and Garden Crops, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel.

4

Center



for Horticultural Research, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 76100 Rehovot, Israel.

5

Corresponding author



Abstract

Phosphorus, an essential plant nutrient, may become toxic when accumulated by plants to high concentrations.

Certain plant species such as Verticordia plumosa L. suffer from P toxicity at solution concentrations far lower than

most other plant species. In this study, exposure of V. plumosa plants to a solution containing as low as 3 mg l

−1

P resulted in significant growth inhibition and typical symptoms of P toxicity. In a wide range of P levels studied,



micronutrient concentrations in V. plumosa leaves were within the range considered adequate for optimal growth.

Notably, tomato plants with high hexokinase activity due to overexpression of Arabidopsis hexokinase (AtHXK1)

exhibited senescence symptoms similar to those of P toxic V. plumosa. The resemblance in senescence symptoms

between P-toxic tomato plants and those with high hexokinase activity suggested that increased sugar metabolism

could play a role in P toxicity in plants. To test this hypothesis, we determined the amount of hexose phosphate, the

product of hexokinase, in V. plumosa leaves grown at various P levels in the nutrient solution. Positive correlations

were found between concentration in the medium, P concentration in the plant, hexose phosphate concentration in

leaves and P toxicity symptoms. Foliar Zn application suppressed P toxicity symptoms and reduced the level of

hexose phosphate in leaves. Furthermore, Zn also inhibited hexokinase activity in vitro. Based on these results we

suggest that P toxicity involves sugar metabolism via increased activity of hexokinase that accelerates senescence



Introduction

The genus Verticordia (Myrtaceae) consists of about

150 species of the most spectacular plants of the

Western Australian flora (Cochrane and McChesney,

1995). These are bushy shrubs under 2 m tall with

small leaves and 5-petal flowers in white, cream, yel-

low,orange, pink and red. Verticordias are sold as cut

flowers in the local and international markets, but des-

pite their popularity and attractiveness as cut flowers,

most of the production comes from natural bush pick-

ing and not from culture. Little is known about the

response of Verticordia spp. to fertilizers, or about

their other nutritional demands (Burton et al., 1996).

In the last two decades efforts have been made in Is-

rael to cultivate new woody flowers originated from

FAX No.: +972-3-9604017;



E-mail: avnsil@volcani@agri.gov.il

the southern hemisphere, mainly for the European cut

flower market.

When grown in preliminary experiments in the

field or on an artificial growth substrate Verticor-

dias were chlorotic and died shortly after planting.

Growth impairment and leaf necrosis or chlorosis of

Australian plants was attributed to phosphorus tox-

icity (Goodwin, 1983; Handreck, 1997; Nichols and

Beardsell, 1981; Parks et al., 2000).

Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all living

organisms. High internal phosphorus concentrations

cause typical symptoms of P toxicity in many plant

species such as alfalfa (Parker, 1997), Arabidopsis

(Delhaize and Randall, 1995; Dong et al., 1998),

corn (Parker, 1997; Safaya, 1976), cotton (Cakmak

and Marschner, 1986, 1987; Marschner and Cakmak,

1986), okra (Loneragan et al., 1982), soybean (Parker,

1997), subterranean clover (Loneragan et al., 1979),

tomato (Jones, 1998; Parker et al., 1992; Parker,



250

1997) and wheat (Parker, 1997; Webb and Loneragan,

1988). P toxicity symptoms include growth inhibition,

interveinal chlorosis and necrosis of leaves, and ac-

celerated senescence. Although the mechanism of P

toxicity in plants is poorly understood, it is accepted

that P toxicity is associated with P–Zn interactions,

either in the soil or in the plant (Loneragan and Webb,

1993). Phosphorus–Zn interactions in the soil are far

better understood. High P concentrations may reduce

Zn availability because of: (i) precipitation of Zn–

P compounds (Barrow, 1987a, b; Lindsay, 1979);

(ii) enhancement of specific adsorption of Zn on the

charged surfaces of oxides and hydroxides follow-

ing increase in negative charges (Barrow, 1993); (iii)

decrease in Zn solubilization following decrease in ex-

cretion of organic acids (Bar-Yosef, 1996; Marschner

and Romheld, 1996); (iv) decrease in root hair dens-

ity (Bates and Lynch, 1996; Ma et al., 2001) and/or

changes in root system architecture (Liao et al., 2001;

Lorenzo and Forde, 2001; Williamson et al., 2001);

and (v) reduction in vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae

(Loneragan and Webb, 1993). Yet, P–Zn interactions

within the plant remain a complex, confusing and an

ambiguous topic (Loneragan and Webb, 1993).

Observations that increasing the Zn supply can

ameliorate P toxicity symptoms have led to the hy-

pothesis that high P levels raise the Zn requirement

of plants, a phenomenon described as ‘P-enhanced Zn

requirement’ (Loneragan and Webb, 1993; Marschner,

1995). Cakmak and Marschner, (1986, 1987) sug-

gested a mechanism of ‘P-induced Zn deficiency’,

whereby a high uptake of P induces Zn deficiency in

the shoots due to precipitation of Zn–P compounds

(Cakmak and Marschner, 1986, 1987; Marschner and

Cakmak, 1986). Formation of Zn–phytate and immob-

ilization of Zn in the roots, reported by Van Steveninck

et al. (1993), are consistent with the above mechanism.

Cakmak and Marschner (1987) suggested that Zn is a

crucial element in the feedback mechanism that con-

trols the uptake of P by the roots, and/or transport of P

from the roots to the shoots. They suggested that Zn

deficiency disrupts this control mechanism and pre-

vents P retranslocation in the phloem, causing toxic

accumulation of P in the leaves. Improving the Zn

nutritional status either by increasing the soil solu-

tion Zn concentration or through foliar application can

reduce the toxicity. Alternatively, overcoming P tox-

icity symptoms through Zn addition could result from

increased CuZnSOD (superoxide dismutase) activity

(Cakmak and Marschner, 1987, 1993; Marschner

and Cakmak, 1989). Furthermore, Zn has a distinct

role in maintaining membrane integrity as Zn defi-

ciency increases the peroxidation of the plasma cell

membrane in the root, leading to leakage of nutri-

tional elements and organic metabolites (Cakmak and

Marschner, 1988a, b Parker et al., 1992; Pinton et

al., 1994; Welch et al., 1982). Membrane integrity

probably depends on the overall Zn status of the plant

and not on Zn levels in roots, since foliar application

of ZnSO

4

has been found to correct membrane leak-



age (Parker et al., 1992). Despite these models, both

the physiological mechanism and the biochemical pro-

cesses by which high P concentrations impair plant

development, as well as the suppressive role of Zn in

P-induced toxicity remain obscure.

Tomato plants that overexpress Arabidopsis hexok-



inase (AtHXK1) were recently shown by Dai et al.

(1999) to exhibit toxicity symptoms similar to those

of P-toxic V. plumosa plants. Hexokinase (HXK) cata-

lyzes the first enzymatic step of sugar metabolism, i.e.,

the formation of hexose phosphates such as glucose 6-

phosphate (Glc6P) and fructose 6-phosphate (Fru6P).

In addition to its enzymatic activity, HXK is involved

in the regulation of photosynthesis, growth and sen-

escence in higher plants (Dai et al., 1999; Jang and

Sheen, 1997; Xiao et al., 2000). Overexpression of

AtHXK1 in tomato plants reduced photosynthesis, in-

hibited growth and accelerated senescence of mature

leaves (Dai et al., 1999). The fact that these transgenic

tomato plants exhibited similar senescence symptoms

to those of P-toxic plants led to the hypothesis that

increased HXK activity may play a role in P tox-

icity in plants. HXK activity is affected by P status:

P-deficient bean roots and suspension-cultured Cath-



aranthus roseus exhibited reduced HXK activity and

decreased hexose phosphate levels (Li and Ashihara,

1990; Rychter and Randall, 1994). To assess the hypo-

thesis that HXK is involved in P toxicity in V. plumose

L. plants, we examined the effects of solution-P con-

centration on P toxicity symptoms and on the level

of hexose phosphate. Because P toxicity symptoms,

particularly leaf-yellowing and shedding, are sim-

ilar to those induced by high levels of ethylene, we

also measured ethylene production in P-treated plants.

In addition, since Zn suppresses P toxicity, we ex-

amined the effect of foliar application of Zn on hexose

phosphate and on P toxicity in V. plumosa plants.


251

Materials and methods

Plant growth and analysis

Verticordia plumosa L. plants were grown in a screen

house (10% shade) in Bet Dagan, Israel (35

E, 31


N,

50 m altitude) during two consecutive years. One-



rooted cuttings of a clonal selection of V. plumosa L.

obtained from the ‘Nir Nursery’ in Israel were planted

on 6 June 1998 in 8-l plastic pots filled with perlite.

The experimental design comprised of five treatments,

allocated to five randomized blocks, each with six

plants. The treatments started on 1 August 1998, and

included five levels of P: 0, 1, 3, 10 and 30 mg l

−1

,



added as H

3

PO



4

to the nutrient solution. The nutri-

ent solution contained (mg l

−1

) 100 N (NH



4

: NO


3

= 2:1) and 80 K in tap water containing 60 Ca, 25

Mg, 80 Na, 20 S, 150 CO

3

, 150 C1 and 0.1 P. The



NH

4

:NO



3

ratio was slightly decreased or increased as

the pH in the leachates decreased below 5.5 or rose

above 6.5, respectively. Micronutrient concentrations

(mg l

−1

) applied were Fe 1, Mn 0.6, Zn 0.5, Cu 0.35,



Mo 0.025 and B 0.25 all EDTA-based, plus 1 mg

l

−1



of Fe as EDDHA-Fe. The electrical conductivity

(EC) of the nutrient solutions was 1.6

±0.2 dS m

−1

and their pH was 7.5



±0.3. The N and K fertilizers

used were NH

4

NO

3



, (NH

4

)



2

SO

4



and KNO

3

. Plants



were irrigated one to five times daily, depending on

the evapotranspiration rate, with a 25% excess to leach

excessive salts from the root zone. Leachates from the

pots (with and without plants) were collected and the

volume monitored daily. The EC, pH values, and P and

other nutrient element concentrations in the leachates

were analyzed once a week. Transpiration was calcu-

lated from the difference between leachate volumes

of the containers with and without plants. Flowering

intensity was estimated by four persons, according to

a scale ranging from 1 (no open flowers) to 5 (full

opening stage).

On 14 April 1999, all plants were pruned to a

height of 20 cm, measured from the rim of the bucket.

The shoots (including flowers) were collected, washed

with distilled water, dried and stored for chemical ana-

lysis. After pruning, plants were irrigated for 2 weeks

with tap water and thereafter with the experimental

solutions described above. In November 1999 and in

April 2000 two plants per replicate were collected and

separated into flowers (only on April 2000), leaves,

stems and roots. The plants were washed with dis-

tilled water, dried in a ventilated oven at 60

C for 1



week, and stored for chemical analysis. The dry plant

material (DM) was ground to pass a 20-mesh sieve.

Samples (100 mg) were wet ashed with H

2

SO



4

–H

2



O

2

and analyzed for Na, K, organic-N and P. HC1O



4

HNO



3

ashing was used for Ca, Mg, and micronutrients

analysis. Organic-N and P were determined with an

injector Lachat Autoanalyzer; and K, Ca, Mg, Fe,

Zn, and Mn by ICP. Water-soluble Zn in the leaves

was determined according to Cakmak and Marschner

(1987).

Effects of P concentration in the nutrient solutions on

hexose phosphate and ethylene production in the

plant

Rooted cuttings of Verticordia plumosa L. were

planted on 21 March 2000 and irrigated with the same

nutrient solution as in experiment I. The treatments

started on 27 April 2000 and included five levels of

P: 0, ,1, 3, 10, and 30 mg l

−1

added as H



3

PO

4



in

the nutrient solution. Samples of young leaves were

analyzed for hexose phosphate after 10 days exposure

to the experimental solutions. No visual indications

of any stress or P toxicity symptoms could be detec-

ted at that time. Ethylene concentrations in mature

leaves were measured 8 days later, when the first vis-

ible symptoms of leaf yellowing appeared in plants

exposed to P at 30 mg l

−1

, and after 35 days exposure



to the experimental solutions, when clear symptoms

of P toxicity appeared in plants exposed to P at 10 mg

l

−1

.



Effects of Zn application on hexose phosphate and

ethylene production

The treatments began on 6 June 2000 and included

four levels of P: 0, 1, 3, and 10 mg l

−1

added as H



3

PO

4



in the nutrient solution. Each P level was split into two

foliar applications (3 ml l

−1

every week) of commer-



cial ‘AVAZON’ solution containing 1 M Zn(NO

3

)



2

+

5 M NH



4

NO

3



+ 1 M CO(NH

2

)



2

, or a solution con-

taining 6 M NH

4

NO



3

+ 1 M CO(NH

2

)

2



as a control.

Ethylene production and the concentration of hexose

phosphate in mature leaves were measured on the 35th

day, when clear symptoms of P toxicity appeared in

plants exposed to P at 10 mg l

−1

.



Protein extraction and enzymatic analysis of HXK

Protein extraction from leaves of HK4 transgenic to-

mato plants that overexpress Arabidopsis HXK (Dai

et al., 1999) was carried out as described in Schaffer

and Petreikov (1997). Approximately 1 g of a mature


252

Figure 1. Plant appearance 90 days after exposure to P treatments (top) and a year later (bottom). Numbers on pots are P concentration in

solution (mg l

−1

).

fresh leaf material was extracted twice with 400 ml of



extraction buffer (50 mM Hepes, pH 7.6, 1 mM EDTA,

10 mM KCl, 3 mM MgCl

2

, 1 mM phenylmethylsulf-



onyl fluoride, 3 mM diethyldithiocarbamic acid and

0.2% polyvinyl polypyrrolidone). The mixture was

centrifuged for 30 min at 12 000 g, 4

C, and, fol-



lowing filtration through gauze pads, the supernatant

was combined with three volumes of 80% ammonium

sulfate and incubated at 4

C for 15 min. After a second



centrifugation at 12 000 g, 4

C, the pellet was resus-



pended in 0.5 ml of washing buffer (50 mM Hepes pH

7.5, 1 mM EDTA and 1 mM DTT) and desalted on a

G-25 Sephadex column (55

× 11 mm).

Hexose kinase activity was measured by the

enzyme-linked assay according to Schaffer and Pet-

reikov (1997). The assays contained 100 µl of protein

extract or 0.375 U of yeast HXK (Roche), in a total

volume of 0.5 ml 30 mM Hepes–NaOH (pH 7.5),

3 mM MgCl

2

, 0.6 mM EDTA, 9 mM KCl, 1 mM



NAD, 1 mM ATP, and 2 U NAD-dependent Glc6P

dehydrogenase (G6PDH, from Leuconostoc). For the

assay of glucose phosphorylation, the reaction was ini-

tiated with 10 mM glucose. Reactions were carried

out at 37

C and absorption at 340 nm was monitored



continuously. Zinc inhibition studies were carried out

in similar manner using 0.02, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 or 1 mM

ZnSO

4

. As a control, HXK activity was measured



with 1 mM MgSO

4

in the medium and only minor



inhibition was observed.

Extraction and assays of sugars

Glucose, fructose, Glc6P and Fru6P in Verticordia

leaves were extracted and assayed spectrophotomet-

rically as described by Tobias et al. (1992) with minor

modifications. Briefly, 1 g fresh weight of leaves was

homogenized with 3 ml of 5% (v/v) HClO

4

and placed



on ice for 60 min. The homogenate was centrifuged at

11 000 for 5 min at 4

C, and 1 ml of the supernatant



was transferred to an Ephendorf tube into which 0.2 ml

of 3 M KOH was added. The salt was precipitated by

centrifugation at 12 000 g for 5 min at 4

C and the



253

supernatant was transferred to a new tube. Active char-

coal was added until a clear supernatant was obtained

following centrifugation as above. Glc6P, Fru6P, gluc-

ose (Glc) and fructose (Fru) were measured spectro-

photometrically by the enzyme-linked assay (Tobias

et al., 1992). The level of Glc was measured fol-

lowing phosphorylation with commercial yeast HXK

(Roche). Subsequent addition of phosphoglucose iso-

merase (PGI) that converts Fru6P into Glc6P allowed

measurement of Fru.

Ethylene production

Ethylene production in excised mature leaves of V.



plumosa was measured after they had been incub-

ated for several hours in sealed test tubes at 25

C

in the dark. At the end of the incubation, 1-ml gas



samples were withdrawn with a hypodermic syringe,

and ethylene in the samples was measured with a gas

chromatograph equipped with an alumina column and

a flame ionizing detector.



Data analysis

Data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA)

by the GLM procedure (SAS-User’s Guide, 1985).

Model parameters were fitted by the NLIN procedure

of SAS, using the DUD routine of SAS (SAS-User’s

guide, 1985).



Results

Plant growth

Growth and dry weight of V. plumosa during the first

year was increased with increasing phosphate concen-

tration up to 1–3 mg l

−1

. However, irrigation with



higher levels of 10 and 30 mg P l

−1

resulted in a sig-



nificant impairment of growth, loss of apical control

and low yield (Figure 1). The plants exhibited typical

symptoms of P toxicity such as chlorosis of new leaves

and necrosis of older ones. With time, the older leaves

abscised, and leaves remained only on the upper parts

of the stems. Finally, the whole plant was defoliated

and after 3 months treatment with 30 mg P l

−1

all



plants had died.

The root/shoot ratio (g g

−1

) decreased dramatic-



ally from 0.23 to 0.06 as P increased from 0 to 1 mg

l

−1



, and to less than 0.02 at 10 mg l

−1

(Figure 2). The



decline in root/shoot ratio with increasing P supply

is consistent with other published results (Lynch and



Figure 2. Root/shoot ratio at the end of the second year as a function

of P concentration in the nutrient solutions. Vertical bars represent

the standard errors (not shown where their size is smaller than the

symbols).



Table 1. Effect of nutrient solution P concentration on dry

weight


−1

of Verticordia plumosa and on flowering intensity

P

Shoots


Roots

Flowers


Flowering

(mg l


−1

)

(g/plant)



intensity

2

0



114

27.0


6.7

3.7


1

574


32.1

50.9


3.0

3

496



13.5

31.0


2.9

10

303



5.8

3.8


1.5

effect

∗∗∗


∗∗∗

∗∗∗


∗∗∗

LSD


0.05

(df=32)


102.9

8.73


13.39

0.39


∗∗∗

Significant at P

≤ 0.001, respectively.

1

Data from the second harvest, April 00.



2

Qualitative evaluation of flowering stage: (1) no open flowers to

(5) full opening stage.

Brown, 1997; Marschner, 1995; Plaxton and Carswell,

1999), yet the decrease observed for Verticordia was

remarkably steeper than those for other plant species.

Whereas the dry matter weight (DM) of shoots, roots

and flowers increased during the second year with in-

creasing P from 0 to 1 mg l

−1

, and decreased at higher



P levels (Table 1), the appearance of buds was pro-

gressively delayed as P increased (only data for the

last sampling date are presented in Table 1).

Effect of P application on leaf P and other nutrient

elements

Leaf-P concentration in young plants increased signi-

ficantly with increasing levels of solution P (Figure 3).

Leaf concentration in plants exposed to 10 and 30 mg



254

Figure 3. Leaf-P concentrations as a function of P concentrations

in the nutrient solutions. Vertical bars represent the standard errors

(not shown where their size is smaller than the symbols).

l

−1



was above the reported critical toxicity level of

10 g kg


−1

DM (Jones, 1998; Marschner, 1995; Parker

et al., 1992). A significant quadratic regression was

obtained between shoot weight and shoot-P concentra-

tions in the first year (Figure 4). Based on the quadratic

equation, maximum shoot weight was achieved when

shoot-P concentration approached 3.7 g kg

−1

, similar



to what has been reported for many plants (Jones et

al., 1991). However, V. plumosa plants reached that

value at a calculated solution concentration of 4.6 mg

P l


−1

. Plant growth was impaired above this shoot-P

value, and yield fell to zero as shoot-P concentration

approached 9 g kg

−1

.

Although P affected the concentration of some



other elements such as N, K and Mn (Table 2), the

concentrations of all nutritional elements were within

the appropriate range for normal plant growth (Jones

et al., 1991; Marschner, 1995). Hence, contrary to the

traditional ‘P-induced Zn deficiency’ theory (Cakmak

and Marschner, 1986, 1987; Marschner and Cak-

mak, 1986), no inverse relationship could be detected

between leaf Zn concentration and leaf P concentra-

tion or P application. Even at the uppermost, youngest

part of shoots, the most sensitive part to Zn defi-

ciency, Zn concentration was always above 50 mg

kg

−1



DM, while the water-soluble Zn concentration

was 16


±2.5 mg kg

−1

DM.



Table 2. Effect of nutrient solution P concentration on nutrient

concentrations in leaves of Verticordia plumosa at harvest

1

P

N



P

K

Fe



Zn

Mn

(mg l



−1

)

(g kg



−1

)

(mg kg



−1

)

Leaves



0

17.1


0.43

5.9


441

56

81



1

22.7


0.89

7.5


382

60

140



3

24.8


3.49

8.6


616

55

204



10

24.5


7.79

9.9


448

68

172



Mean

22.3


3.18

8.0


472

60

149



P effect

∗∗∗


∗∗∗

∗∗∗


ns

ns

∗∗∗



LSD

0.05


(df=31)

0.16


0.814

0.70


299.6

21.6


20.5

Roots


0

10.2


0.29

1.9


550

65

219



1

14.9


0.69

4.3


719

79

162



3

16.8


1.77

4.8


685

83

136



10

15.2


2.21

3.3


853

92

103



Mean

14.2


1.25

3.6


702

80

155



P effect

∗∗∗


∗∗∗

∗∗∗


ns

ns

∗∗∗



LSD

0.05


(df=31)

1.55


0.504

0.52


286.3

28.7


37.3

∗∗∗


Significant at P

≤0.001; ns – not significant.

1

Data from the second harvest, April 00.



Figure 4. Shoots dry weights (DM) as a function of leaf-P concen-

tration at the end of the first year (April 1999). Symbols represent

experimental results. The plotted line was calculated according to

the equation: DM= 77 + 893–3793X

2

. The standard errors of the



regression parameters were 5.9, 139.0, and 486.3, respectively.

Effects of P on the level of hexose phosphate and on

ethylene production

P toxicity symptoms in V. plumosa were similar to

those of tomato plants with high HXK activity re-

ported by Dai et al. (1999). To test whether V.



plumosa P toxicity involves enhanced HXK activ-

255

Figure 5. Phosphorylated glucose (Glc6P) and glucose (Glc) con-

centrations as a function of leaf-P concentration. Vertical bars

represent the standard error of each treatment (not shown where

their size is smaller than the symbols). The standard errors of the

regression parameters were: (a) 8.1 and 0.69, respectively; (b) 12.6

and 0.02, respectively.

ity, we measured the levels of phosphorylated and

nonphosphorylated glucose (product and substrate of

HXK, respectively) in V. plumosa plants exposed to

various P levels in the solution. The level of phos-

phorylated glucose (Glc6P) increased and that of non-

phosphorylated glucose (Glc) decreased as a function

of leaf P (Figures 5a and b, respectively). We did

not measure HXK activity in protein extracts because

we could not obtain satisfactory protein extracts from

Verticordia leaves. Ethylene production in V. plumose

leaves also increased as a function of P concentration

(Figure 6). in accord with earlier findings in which

overexpression of Arabidopsis HXK in tomato plants

caused increased production of ethylene (Granot et al.,

unpublished data).



Figure 6. Ethylene production (Ethi) as a function of leaf-P concen-

tration. Vertical bars represent the standard error of each treatment

(not shown where their size is smaller than the symbols). The

standard errors of the regression parameters were 0.36 and 0.03 2,

respectively.

Effects of Zn on P toxicity and ethylene production

Foliar Zn treatments were shown to prevent P toxicity

symptoms (Loneragan and Webb, 1993; Marschner,

1995). To assess the effect of Zn on P toxicity, V.



plumosa, plants grown at four P levels were sprayed

with Zn. As expected, foliar application of Zn did not

affect plants exposed to low P levels (below 3 mg l

−1

),



but significantly suppressed P toxicity symptoms in

plants exposed to P at 10 mg l

−1

. The latter became



less chlorotic and had longer leaves and internodes

than control plants (Figure 7). The concentrations of

none of the nutrients were affected by the foliar Zn

application, all of which remained similar to those

presented in Table 1, except for of the Zn concen-

tration in the youngest leaves, which increased from

45

±4 to 90±24 mg kg



−1

DM. This increase, however,

might have resulted from external Zn contamination.

Since P toxicity is associated with increased produc-

tion of ethylene, we examined the effect of Zn on

ethylene level. As expected, Zn treatment reduced

ethylene production in plants exposed to 10 mg P l

−1

(Figure 8).



Effects of Zn on HXK activity and on the level of

hexose phosphate

Zn was reported to inhibit the activity of mammalian

HXK (Canesi et al., 1998). Since we could not obtain

satisfactory extracts of protein from V. plumosa, we



256

Figure 7. Effect of foliar application of Zn on the phenotype of plants exposed to 10 mg P l

−1

.



examined the effect of Zn on HXK activity in protein

extracts prepared from tomato plants overexpressing



Arabidopsis hexokinase. We also checked the effect

of Zn on yeast HXK. In both plant and yeast HXKs,

low concentrations of Zn (<1 mM) significantly in-

hibited HXK activity (Figure 9). To find whether Zn

also reduces the level of hexose phosphate in vivo, we

measured the level of Glc and Glc6P in V. plumosa

following foliar application of Zn. Plants sprayed with

Zn had lower levels of Glc6P and increased levels of

Gic, especially at high leaf-P concentration (Figure

10). These results are in accord with the visual symp-

toms of P toxicity and ethylene production (Figures 7

and 8).


257

Figure 8. Effect of foliar application of Zn on ethylene production.

Vertical bars represent the standard error of each treatment (not

shown where their size is smaller than the symbols).

Figure 9. HXK activity in yeast and transgenic tomato plant overex-

pressing Arabidopsis HXK (AtHXK1) as a function of Zn concen-

tration. Vertical bars represent the standard error of each treatment

(not shown where their size is smaller than the symbols).



Figure 10. Effect of foliar application of Zn on phosphorylated

glucose (Glc6P) and glucose (Glc) concentrations. Vertical bars rep-

resent the standard error of each treatment (not shown where their

size is smaller than the symbols).



Discussion

P toxicity in V. plumosa plants was clearly demon-

strated here by the significant relationships found

between growth parameters, such as dry weight pro-

duction and flowering intensity, and P levels in the

irrigating solution and in leaves (Table 1, Figures 2–

4). These relationships highlight the crucial role of

P in Verticordia development. The concentrations of

all other elements were within the appropriate ranges

for normal plant development, and no significant cor-

relations were found between growth parameters and

concentrations of elements other than P, neither in the

irrigation solution nor in the plant tissues. Total Zn and

water-soluble Zn concentrations in Verticordia leaves

at all studied P levels were within the range considered

adequate for optimal growth, and significantly higher



258

than the critical deficiency levels of 15–25 (Marschner,

1995; Welch, 1995) or 5–7 mg kg

−1

(Cakmak and



Marschner, 1987). These results are in accord with

findings in tomato and A. thaliana showing typical

P toxicity symptoms even in plants containing nor-

mal concentrations of total Zn or water-soluble Zn in

their tissues (Delhaize and Randall, 1995; Parker et

al., 1992). Therefore, in these cases the mechanism of

‘P-induced Zn (or any other micronutrient) deficiency’

could not account for P toxicity.

P toxicity-like symptoms, such as growth inhibi-

tion and accelerated senescence, were previously ob-

served in tomato plants that overexpress AtHXK1 (Dai

et al., 1999). These symptoms were correlated with

HXK activity and with the level of hexose phosphate

in the plant. The resemblance between senescence

symptoms observed in transgenic tomato plants over-

expressing AtHXK1 and P toxicity symptoms in V.



plumosa, combined with the lack of any relationship

with Zn deficiency, as observed in this and other stud-

ies (Delhaize and Randall, 1995; Parker et al., 1992),

gave rise to the hypothesis that P toxicity is related

to sugar metabolism rather than to a nutritional dis-

order. Indeed, similar to tomato plants that overexpress

AtHXK1, V. plumosa plants grown at high solution

P levels had higher levels of hexose phosphate and

reduced levels of nonphosphorylated hexoses.

It has been shown that HXK activity and hexose

levels are affected by P level in the plant. P-deficient

bean roots and suspension cultured Catharanthus ros-



eus had lower levels of HXK activity, lowered concen-

trations of hexose phosphate and increased concentra-

tions of hexose (Li and Ashihara, 1990; Rychter and

Randall, 1994). These changes were reversed by the

addition of P. Phosphorus taken up by plants is used to

form ATP, either by photo-phosphorylation or by other

biochemical reactions. Indeed, increased levels of Pi

and ATP have been observed in suspension-culture of



C. roseus, upon transfer to P-containing medium (Li

and Ashihara, 1990). ATP is a substrate of HXK and is

required for HXK activity. Possibly, P raised the level

of ATP in Verticordia plants and consequently accel-

erated the activity of HXK. However, it is plausibly to

assume that in addition to sugar metabolism described

above, other possible modes or sites of action were

affected by P nutrition as well.

Zn treatments that suppressed P toxicity reduced

the level of hexose phosphate in V. plumose. Zn in-

hibits the activity of mammalian HXK (Canesi et

al., 1998) and causes ATP hydrolysis by modulat-

ing the activity of yeast pyrophosphatase (Schlesinger

and Coon, 1960). It is possible that Zn acceler-

ates hydrolysis of ATP by modulating the activity of

pyrophosphatase in Verticordia plants and as a con-

sequence decreases HXK activity. Alternatively, Zn

may interfere directly with HXK activity, as demon-

strated for tomato and yeast HXKs (Figure 9). HXK

requires Mg as a co-factor, and Zn, being a divalent

cation, may compete with Mg and thereby inhibit

HXK activity. Phosphorus and Zn appear to have op-

posite effects on HXK: whereas P increased HXK

activity in suspension culture of Catharanthus roseus

(Li and Ashihara, 1990) and raised the level of hex-

ose phosphate in V. plumosa plants (Figure 5), Zn,

at in planta physiological concentration (1–2 mM),

decreased HXK activity (Figure 9) and reduced the

level of hexose phosphate. Hence we suggest that Zn

suppressed P-toxicity symptoms by inhibition of HXK

activity.

High P levels significantly increased ethylene pro-

duction in Verticordia leaves (Figure 6), whereas Zn,

which suppressed P toxicity, reduced ethylene produc-

tion (Figure 8). There are conflicting reports on the

effect of high P levels on ethylene production. High

P levels in the incubation medium inhibited ethyl-

ene production in tomato fruit slices, an effect that

was particularly pronounced during ripening, when

ethylene production was high (Chaluz et al., 1980; So-

bolewska and Plich, 1986). In one study, application of

P at 0.1 M significantly increased ethylene production

in apple disks (Sobolewska and Plich, 1986), though

in a similar experiment no increase was observed for

the same concentration in apple and avocado disks

(Chaluz et al., 1980). In olive branches, application

of P at 75 mM through the base of cut stems enhanced

ethylene production, but apparently independently of

P-induced leaf abscission (Yamada and Martin, 1994).

Phosphorus-toxicity symptoms observed in V.



plumosa, such as leaf yellowing and shedding, are

also characteristic of plant responses to high ethylene

levels (Abeles et al., 1992). Reduced flowering intens-

ity at high P levels might also be a response to elevated

levels of ethylene, which have been shown to inhibit

flowering in short-day plants (Abeles, 1967; Reid and

Wu, 1991). A number of studies have suggested that

ethylene mediates plant responses to stress conditions,

including nutrient stress (Lynch and Brown, 1997;

Morgan and Drew, 1997). However, at present, it is not

clear whether the elevated levels of ethylene at high

solution P levels play a role in the development of P

toxicity symptoms. Yet, the fact that increased ethyl-

ene production in V. plumosa was observed at early



259

stages of P toxicity symptoms suggest that ethylene

may play a role in this process.

The positive correlation between the levels of hex-

ose phosphate, ethylene production and the severity of

P toxicity symptoms (Figures. 1, 7a, and 8, respect-

ively) suggests association between sugar metabol-

ism and ethylene production. Transgeni tomato plants

that overexpress AtHXK1 also produce more ethyl-

ene (Granot et al., unpublished result). However, in

all these cases, a cause and effect relations between

sugar metabolism, ethylene production and the pheno-

type have not been demonstrated. Interaction between

glucose and HXK activity on one hand and ethylene

signal transduction on the other hand was found for

Arabidopsis plants (Zhou et al., 1998). It is possible

that tissue P levels affect these interactions as well.

Many crops, such as alfalfa, corn, cotton, to-

mato, wheat, soybean and cotton exhibit P toxicity

symptoms (Cakmak and Marshner, 1986; Marschner

and Cakmak, 1986, 1987; Parker, 1997; Webb and

Loneragan, 1988; Safaya, 1976). However, unlike



V. plumosa that exhibits P toxicity at 3 mg P l

−1

,



these other species are sensitive only at P-levels above

30 mg l


−1

. Yet, whereas the other species are fostered

in culture at high (30 mg l

−1

) P-levels, V. plumosa is a



native Australian plant, grown in soils where the low

P level was probably a limiting factor that shaped its

evolution. It is possible, therefore, that V. plumosa ac-

quired a very efficient mechanism to absorb P, which,

in addition to the known mechanisms described above,

may involve an efficient HXK activity and sugar meta-

bolism. Supplementing V. plumosa with ‘normal’ (30

mg l


−1

) P levels resulted in high HXK activity, which

led to inhibited growth and accelerated senescence.

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to Dr. B. Bar-Yosef, Prof.

U. Kafkafi, Dr. E. Delhaize and anonymous reviewers

for critical reading of the article and their construct-

ive comments. This paper is contribution No. 605/01

(2001 series) of the Agricultural Research Organiza-

tion of the Volcani Center. This work was supported

by Binational Agricultural Research and Development

(BARD) grant IS-2894-97 and by Binational Science

Foundation (BSF) grant 97-00250.



References

Abeles F B 1967 Inhibition of flowering in Xanthium pensylvnicum

Walln. by ethylene. Plant Physiol 42, 608–609.

Abeles F B, Morgan P W and Saltveit M E Jr 1992 Ethylene in plant

biology. Academic Press, Inc., San Diego, CA.

Barrow N J 1987a The effects of phosphate on zinc sorption by soils.

J. Soil Sci. 38, 453–459.

Barrow N J 1 987b Reactions with Variable Charge Soils. Martinus

Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht.

Barrow N J 1993 Mechanisms of reaction of zinc with soil and soil

components. In Zinc in Soils and Plants. Ed A D Robson. pp

15–31. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.

Bar-Yosef B 1996 Root excretion and their enviroumental effects:

influence on availabllity of phosphorus. In Plant Roots, The Hid-

den Half, 2nd edition. Eds Y Waisel, A Eshel and U Katkafi. pp

581–605. Marcel Dekker, New York.

Bates T R and Lynch J P 1996 Stimulation of root hair elongation in

Arabidopsis thaliana by low phosphorus availability. Plant Cell

Environ. 19, 529–538.

Burton N, Cowie P, McEvoy S and True D 1996 Investigation into

Verticordia spp. 4th National Workshop for Australian Native

Flowers, pp. 185–190, Perth.

Cakmak I and Marschner H 1986 Mechanism of phosphorus-

induced zinc deficiency in cotton. I. Zinc deficiency-enhanced

uptake rate of phosphorus. Physiol. Plant. 68, 483–490.

Cakmak I and Marschner H 1987 Mechanism of phosphorus-

induced zinc deficiency in cotton. III. Changes in physiological

availability of zinc in plants. Physiol. Plant. 70, 13–20.

Cakmak I and Marschner H 1988a Enhanced superoxide radical

production in roots of zinc-deficient plants. J. Exp. Bot. 39,

1449–1460.

Cakmak I and Marschner H 1988b Increase in membrane permeab-

ility and exudation of roots of zinc deficient plants. J. Plant

Physiol. 132, 356–361.

Cakmak I and Marschner H 1993 Effect of zinc nutritional status

on activities of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide scav-

enging enzyme in bean leaves. Plant Soil 155/6 127–130.

Canesi L, Ciacci C, Piccoli G, Stocchi G, Viarengo A and Gallo

G 1998 In vitro and in vivo effects of heavy metals on mus-

sel digestive gland hexokinase activity: the role of glutathione.

Comp Biochem Physiol C Pharmacol Toxicol Endocrinol 120,

261–268.


Chaluz E, Matto A and Fuchs Y 1980 Biosynthesis of ethylene: The

effect of phosphate. Plant Cell Environ. 3, 349–356.

Cochrane A and McChesney C 1995 Verticordia seed. Australian

Plants. 18, 194–201.

Dai N, S chaffer A, Petreikov M, Shahak Y, Giller Y, Ratner K, Lev-

ine A and Granot D 1999 Overexpression of Arabidopsis hexok-

inase in tomato plants inhibits growth, reduces photosynthesis,

and induces rapid senescence. Plant Cell 11, 1253–1266.

Delhaize E and Randall P J 1995 Characterization of a phosphate-

accumulator mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant Physiol. 107,

207–213.

Dong B, Rengel Z and Delhaize E 1998 Uptake and translocation of

phosphate by pho mutant and wild-type seedlings of Arabidopsis

thaliana. Planta 105, 251–256.

Goodwin P B 1983 Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and iron nu-

trition of Australian native plants. In Proceeding of the National

Technical Workshop on Production and Marketing of Australian

Wild-Flowers for Export. pp 85–97. Univ., Ext., Univ., West.,

Nedlands.

Handreck K A 1997 Phosphorus requirement of Australian native

plants. Aust. J. Soil Res. 35, 241–289.



260

Jang J C and Sheen J 1997 Sugar sensing in higher plants. Trends

Plant Sci. 2, 208–214.

Jelitto T, Sonnewald U, Willmitzer L, Hajirezeai M and Stitt M

1992 Inorganic pyrophosphate content and metabolites in potato

and tobacco plants expressing E. coli pyrophosphatase in their

cytosol. Planta 188, 238–244.

Jones J B Jr 1998 Phosphorus toxicity in tomato: when and how

does it occur. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 29, 1779–1784.

Jones J B Jr, Wolf B and Mills H A 1991 Plant Analysis Handbook.

Macro-Macro Publishing, Georgia.

Liao H, Rubio G, Yan X, Cao A, Brown K M and Lynch J P 2001

Effect of phosphorus availability on basal root shallowness in

common beap. Plant Soil 232, 69–79.

Li X-N and Ashihara H 1990 Effects of inorganic phosphate on

sugar catabolism by suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus.

Phytochemistry 29, 497–500.

Lindsay W L 1979 Chemical Equilibrium in Soils. Wiley, New

York.

Loneragan J F and Webb M J 1993 Interactions between zinc and



other nutrients affecting the growth of plants. In Zinc in Soils

and Plants. Ed A D Robson. pp 119–134. Kluwer Academic

Publishers, Dordrecht.

Loneragan J F, Grove T S, Robson A D and Snowball K 1979

Phosphorus toxicity as a factor in zinc-phosphorus interactions

in plants. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 43, 966–972.

Loneragan J F, Grimes D L, Welch R M, Aduayi E A, Tengah A,

Lazar V A and Cary E E 1982 Phosphorus accumulation and

toxicity in leaves in relation to zinc supply. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.

46, 345–352.

Lorenzo H and Forde B 2001 The nutritional control of root

development. Plant Soil 232, 51–68.

Lynch J and Brown K M 1997 Ethylene and plant responses to

nutritional stress. Physiol. Plant. 100, 613–619.

Ma Z, Bielenberg D G, Brown K M and Lynch J P 2001 Regulation

of root hair density by phosphorus availability in Arabidopsis

thaliana. Plant Cell Environ. 24, 459–467.

Marschner H 1995 Mineral Nutrition of Higher Plants. 2nd edition,

Academic Press, San Diego, CA.

Marschner H and Cakmak 1986 Mechanism of phosphorus-induced

zinc deficiency in cotton. II. Evidence for impaired shoot con-

trol of phosphorus uptake translocation under zinc deficiency.

Physiol. Plant. 68 491–496.

Marschner H and Cakmak 1989 High light intensity enhances chi-

orosis and necrosis in leaves of zinc, potassium, and magnesium

deficient bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants. J. Plant Physiol. 134,

308–315.

Marschner H and Romheld V 1996 Root-Induced Changes in the

Availability of Micronutrients in the Rhizosphere. In Plant Roots.

The Hidden Half, 2nd Eds. Y Waisel, A Eshel and U Katkafi. pp

557–579. Marcel Dekker, New York.

Morgan P W and Drew M C 1997 Ethylene and plant responses to

stress. Physiol. Plant. 100, 620–630.

Nichols D G and Beardsell D V 1981 The response of phosphorus-

sensitive plants to slow-release fertilizers in soil-less potting

mixtures. Sci. Hortic 15, 301–309.

Parker D R 1997 Responses of six crop species to solution zinc

activities buffered HEDTA. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 61, 167–176.

Parker D R, Aguilera J J and Thomson D N 1992 Zinc-phosphate

interactions in two cultivars of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum

L.) grown in chelator-buffered nutrient solutions. Plant Soil 143,

163–177.


Parks S E, Haigh A M and Cresswell G C 2000 Stem tissue phos-

phorus as an index of the phosphorus status of Banksia ericifolia

L. f. Plant Soil 227, 59–65.

Pinton R, Cakmak I and Marschner H 1994 Zinc deficiency en-

hanced NAD(P)H-dependent superoxider radical production in

plasma membrane vesicles isolated from roots of bean plants. J.

Exp. Bot. 270, 45–50.

Plaxton W C and Carswell C 1999 Metabolic aspects of the phos-

phate starvation response in plants. In Plant Responses To Envir-

onmental Stress. Ed H Lerner. pp 350–372. Marcel Dekker, New

York.

Reid M S and Wu M J 1991 Ethylene in flower development and



senescence. In The Plant Hormone Ethylene. Eds A K Mattoo

and J C Suttle. pp 215–234. CRC Press, London.

Rychter A M and Randall D D 1994 The effect of phosphate defi-

ciency on carbohydrate metabolism in been roots. Physiol. Plant.

91, 383–388.

Safaya N M 1976 Phosphorus-zinc interaction in relation to absorp-

tion rates of phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese, and iron in

corn. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 40, 719–722.

SAS-User’s Guide (1985) SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC.

Schaffer A and Petreikov M 1997 Sucrose-to-starch metabolism

in tomato fruit undergoing transient starch accumulation. Plant

Physiol. 113, 739–746.

Schlesinger M J, and Coon M J 1960 Hydrolysis of nucleoside di-

and triphosphates by crysaline preparations of yeast inorganic

pyrophosphatase. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 41, 30–36.

Sobolewska J and Plich H 1986 The effect of inorganic phosphate

on the ethylene production in tomato and apple fruits. Biol. Plant.

28, 95–99.

Tobias R B, Boyer C D and Shannon J C 1992 Alterations in carbo-

hydrate intermediates in the endosperm of starch-deficient maize

(Zea mays L.) genotypes. Plant Physiol, 99, 146–152.

Van Steveninck R F, Barber M A, Fernando D R and Kan Steveninck

M E 1993 The binding of zinc in root cells of crop plants by

phytic acid. In Proc. XII Intl. Plant Nutr. Colloq. Perth, Australia.

Ed N J Barrow. pp 775–778. Kluwer, Dordecht, The Netherlands.

Webb M J and Loneragan J F 1988 Effect of Zinc deficiency on

growth, phosphorus concentration, and phosphorus toxicity of

wheat plants. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 52, 1676–1680.

Welch R M, Webb M J and Loneragan J F 1982 Zinc in membrane

function and its role in phosphorus toxicity. In Plant Nutrition. Ed

A Scaife. pp 710–715. Proc. 9th Int. Plant Nutr. Coll., Commonw

Agric. Bur. Farnham Royal, UK.

Welch R M 1995 Micronutrient nutrition of plants. Crit. Rev. Plant

Sci. 14, 49–82.

Williamson L C, Ribrioux S P C P, Fitter A H and Leyser H M 0

2001 Phosphate availability regulates root system architecture in

Arabidopsis. Plant Physiol. 126, 875–882.

Xiao W, Sheen J and Jang JC 2000 The role of hexokinase in plant

sugar signal transduction and growth and development. Plant

Mol. Biol. 44, 451–461.

Yamada H and Martin G C 1994 Physiology of olive leaf abscission

induced by phosphorus. J. Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. 119, 956–963.

Zhou L, Jang J C, Jones T L and Sheen J 1998 Glucose and

ethylene signal transduction crosstalk revealed by an Arabidop-

sis glucose-insensitive mutant. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 95,

10294–10299.



Section editor: P. Ryan



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə