International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research



Yüklə 68.89 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix07.08.2017
ölçüsü68.89 Kb.

Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 28(2), September – October 2014; Article No. 11, Pages: 52-54                                              ISSN 0976 – 044X 

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

52

 



 

 

                                                                                                                          

 

 

Soosaimichael Mary Jelastin Kala



1

, Pious Soris Tresina 

2

, Veerabahu Ramasamy Mohan

2*

 

1

 Department of Chemistry, St. Xavier’s College, Palayamkottai, Tamil Nadu, India. 



2

 Ethnopharmacology Unit, Research Department of Botany, V.O.Chidambaram College, Tuticorin-628008, Tamil Nadu, India. 



*Corresponding author’s E-mail:

 

vrmohan_2005@yahoo.com 



 

Accepted on: 19-07-2014; Finalized on: 30-09-2014. 

ABSTRACT 

The  anti-inflammatory  effect  of  ethanol  extract  of  E.  floccosa  leaf  administered  orally  at  doses  of  150  and  300  mg/kg,  were 

evaluated in vivo using carrageenan induced paw edema were used to evaluate the acute effect of the plant extract. The ethanol 

extract of E. floccosa showed significant reduction in the paw edema volume (60.9%) at a dose of 300 mg/kg after 3h carrageenan 

injection.  The  phytochemical  screening  showed  the  presence  of  alkaloids,  flavonoids,  saponins,  tannins,  phenols,  glycosides  and 

xanthoprotein. 

 

Keywords: E. floccosa, anti-inflammatory, carrageenan, saponin.

 

 



INTRODUCTION 

nflammation  is  considered  as  a  defense  mechanism 

that  helps  body  to  protect  itself  against  infection, 

burns,  toxic  chemicals,  allergens  or  other  noxious 

stimuli. An uncontrolled and persistent inflammation may 

act  as  an  etiologic  factor  for  many  of  these  chronic 

illnesses

1

.  Although  it  is  a  defense  mechanism,  the 



complex events and mediators involved the inflammatory 

reaction  can  induce,  maintain  or  aggravate  many 

diseases

2

.  Currently  used  anti-inflammatory  drugs  are 



associated  with  some  severe  side effects.  Therefore,  the 

development  of  potent  anti-inflammatory  drugs  with 

fewer side effects is necessary. 

Eugenia floccosa Bedd is one of the medicinally important 

plants  belongs  to  Myrtaceae  family.  The  ethanol  extract 

of  E.  floccosa  has  been  reported  for  its  anti-tumour 

activity,  antidiabetic,  antihyperlipidaemic  and  in  vitro 

antioxidant activity

3-6


  

The  objective  of  this  investigation  was  to  ascertain  the 

scientific basis of its use in treatment of inflammation on 

which  there  is  no  previous  data  available.  Hence,  in  the 

present  study  effort  has  been  made  to  establish  the 

scientific  validity  to  the  anti-inflammatory  property  of  E. 



floccosa  leaf  extract  using  carrageenan  induced  paw 

edema in experimental rats. 



MATERIALS AND METHODS 

Plant Material 

The  leaves  of  Eugenia  floccosa  Bedd  were  freshly 

collected  from  the  well  grown  healthy  plants  inhabiting 

the natural forests of Kothiayar, Agasthiarmalai Biosphere 

Reserve,  Western  Ghats,  Tamilnadu.  The  plant  were 

identified and authenticated in Botanical Survey of India, 

Southern Circle, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, India. A voucher 

specimen  was  deposited  in  Ethnopharmacology  Unit, 

Research  Department  of  Botany,  V.O.Chidambaram 

College, Tuticorin, Tamilnadu.  



Preparation of plant extract for phytochemical screening 

and anti-inflammatory studies 

The  E.  floccosa  leaves  were  shade  dried  at  room 

temperature  and  the  dried  leaves  were  powdered  in  a 

Wiley mill. Hundred grams of powdered E. floccosa leaves 

was  packed  in  a  Soxhlet  apparatus  and  extracted  with 

ethanol The extract were subjected to qualitative test for 

the  identification  of  various  phytochemical  constituents 

as  per  the  standard  procedures 

7-10

.The  ethanol  extracts 



were  concentrated  in  a  rotary  evaporator.  The 

concentrated 

ethanol 

extract 


were 

used 


for 

antiinflammatory studies. 



Animals 

Adult  Wistar  albino  rats  of  either  sex  (150-200g)  were 

used  for  present  investigation.  Animals  were  housed 

under standard environmental conditions at temperature 

(25±2ºC)  and  light  and  dark  (12:12h).    Rats  were  feed 

standard  pellet  diet  (Goldmohur  brand,  Ms  Hindustan 

Lever Ltd., Mumbai, India) and water ad libitum. 

Acute toxicity study 

Acute  oral  toxicity  study  was  performed  as  per  OECD  – 

423  guidelines  (acute  toxic  class  method),  albino  rats 

(n=6)  of  either  sex  selected  by  random  sampling  were 

used  for  acute  toxicity  study 

11

.  The  animals  were  kept 



fasting for overnight and provided only with water, after 

which  the  extracts  were  administered  orally  at  5mg/kg 

body  weight  by  gastric  intubations  and  observed  for  14 

days.  If  mortality  was  observed  in  two  out  of  three 

animals,  then  the  dose  administered  was  assigned  as 

toxic dose. If mortality was observed in one animal, then 

the  same  dose  was  repeated  again  to  confirm  the  toxic 

dose.  If  mortality  was  not  observed,  the  procedure  was 



Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Eugenia floccosa Bedd leaf



Research Article 



Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 28(2), September – October 2014; Article No. 11, Pages: 52-54                                              ISSN 0976 – 044X 

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

53

 



repeated  for  higher  doses  such  as  50,100,  and  2000 

mg/kg body weight. 



Carrageenan induced hind paw oedema 

Albino rats of either sex weighing 150-200g were divided 

into  four groups  of  six  animals  each.    The  dosage  of  the  

drugs  administered  to  the  different  groups  was  as 

follows, Group I - Control (normal saline 0.5ml/kg), Group 

II – Leaf extract of E. floccosa (150 mg/kg, p.o.), Group III 

–  leaf  extract  of  E.  floccosa  (300mg/kg,  p.o.)  and  Group 

IV-Indomethacin  (10mg/kg).  All  the  drugs  were 

administered orally. 

After  one  hour  of  the  administration  of  the  drugs,  0.1ml 

of  1%  w/v  carageenan  solution  in  normal  saline  was 

injected  into  the  subplantar  tissue  of  the  left  hind  paw 

and  the  right  hind  paw  of  the  rat  was  served  as  the 

control.    The  paw  volume  of  the  rats  were  measured  in 

the  digital  plethysmograph (Ugo  basile, Italy),  at  the end 

of  0  min.,  60min.,  120min.,  180min.    The  percentage 

increase  in  paw  oedema  of  the  treated  groups  was 

compared  with  that  of  the  control  and  the  inhibitory 

effect of the drugs were studied.  The relative potency of 

the drugs under investigations was calculated based upon 

the percentage inhibition of the inflammation. 

The  percentage  inhibition  of  the  inflammation  was 

calculated from the formula: 

Percentage Inhibition = D

o

-D

t



 / D

o

 ×100, where D



O

 was the 

average  inflammation  (hind  paw  oedema)  of  the  control 

group  of  rats  at  a  given  time;  and  D

t

  was  the  average 



inflammation  of  the  drug  treated  (i.e  extracts  or 

reference indomethacin) rats at the same time. 



RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

The  phytochemical  screening  of  ethanol  extract  of  E. 



floccosa  leaf  revealed  the  presence  of  alkaloid,  catechin, 

coumarin,  flavonoid,  tannin,  saponin,  steroid,  phenol, 

glycoside,  terpenoid  and  xanthoprotein.  Acute  toxicity 

study revealed the nontoxic nature of the ethanol extract 

of E. floccosa. 

The inhibitory effect of the ethanol extract of E. floccosa 

on carrageenan induced paw edema is shown in Table 1. 

For each of the two doses of extract tested (150 and 300 

mg/kg)  the  ethanol  extract  exerted  considerable 

inhibitory  effect  on  paw  increase  1  hour  after 

carrageenan  administration  with  about  a  50%  inhibition 

for  the  dose  300  mg/kg.  The  maximum  inhibition  60.9% 

(p<0.01) elicited by the ethanol extract of E. floccosa was 

recorded 

hours 


after 

carrageenan 

injection. 

Indomethacin which is a reference drug showed a similar 

inhibitory effect 3 hours after carrageenan administration 

(60.1%). 

Inflammation  has  different  phases;  the  first  phase  is 

caused  by  an  increase  in  vascular  permeability,  the 

second  one  by infiltrate  by  leucocytes  and  the  third  one 

by  granuloma  formation.  In  the  present  study,  anti-

inflammatory activity was determined by using inhibition 

of carrageenan induced inflammation which is one of the 

most  feasible  methods  to  screen  anti-inflammatory 

agents. The development of carrageenan induced edema 

is bi-phasic; the first phase is attributed to the release of 

histamine,  serotonin  and  kinins  and  the  second  phase  is 

related  to  the  release  of  prostaglandins  and  bradykinins 

12-15


.  In  the  present  study,  the  ethanol  extract  of  E. 

floccosa  leaf  showed  significant  inhibition  against 

carrageenan-induced  paw  edema  in  the  dose  dependent 

manner.  This  response  tendency  of  the  extract  in 

carrageenan  induced  paw  edema  revealed  good 

peripheral  antiinflammatory  properties  of  the  ethanol 

extract.  This  anti-inflammatory  effect  of  ethanol  extract 

of E. floccosa may be due to the presence of flavonoids. It 

has  been  reported  that  a  number  of  flavonoids  possess 

anti-inflammatory  activity

16

.  The  presence  of  flavonoid 



identified  might  be  responsible  for  the  antiinflammatory 

activity  in  ethanol  extract.  Tau-Muurolol,  α-Cadinol, 

phytol and oleic acid were reported in the ethanol extract 

of E. floccosa leaf by GC-MS analysis 

17

. These compounds 



may  have  the  role  in  anti-inflammatory  effect.  Further 

studies  will  be  carried  out  to  isolate  and  characterize 

other anti-inflammatory chemical constituents present in 

the ethanol extract of this plant. 



Table 1: Antiinflammatory activity of ethanol extract of Eugenia floccosa leaves 

Group 

Treatment 

(mg/kg) 

Paw volume in ml± SEM and percentage of inhibition 

0 min 

30 min 

60 min 

120 min 

180 min 

Group I 


0.5 ml saline 

0.565±0.04 

0.651±0.06 

0.682±0.007 

0.711±0.001 

0.780±0.01 

Group II 

150 


0.499±0.01 

0.520±0.02(20.0) 

0.412±0.07(39.6) 

0.353±0.03(50.3) 

0.311±0.02 (60.1) 

Group III 

300 

0.482±0.03 



0.491±0.002(24.5) 

0.434±0.07(36.3)* 

0.381±0.001(46.4)** 

0.334±0.06 (57.2)** 

Group IV 

10 


0.407±0.08 

0.531±0.05(18.5) 

0.479±0.002(29.7)* 

0.374±0.02(47.4)** 

0.305±0.02 (60.9)** 

No. of animal / in each group 6 Data expressed in mean ± SEM * p < 0. 05 when compared to control.   ** p < 0.01 



 

Acknowledgement:  Thanks  to  Dr.  Sampathraj,  Honorary 

Advisor, Samsun Clinical Research Laboratory, Tirupur for 

their  assistance  in  animal  studies.  The  last  two  authors 

are  thankful  to  University  Grants  Commission  –  New 

Delhi,  for  their  financial  support  (Ref.  No:  39-

429/2010(SR) dated 7

th

 JAN 2011). 



 

 

Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 28(2), September – October 2014; Article No. 11, Pages: 52-54                                              ISSN 0976 – 044X 

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

54

 



REFERENCES 

1.

 



Kumar  V,  Abbas  AK  and  Fausto  N,  Pathologic  basics  of 

disease.  (eds)  Robbins  and  Cotran.  7

th

  edition.  Elsevier 



Saundars. Philadelphia, Pennysilvania. 2004, pp. 47-86. 

2.

 



Sosa S, Balicet MJ, Arvigo R, Esposito RG, Pizza C and Altiner 

GA,  Screening of the  tropical  anti-inflammatory  activity  of 

some central American Plants. J. Ethnopharmacol, 8, 2002, 

211-215. 

3.

 

Kala  SMJ,  Tresina  Soris  P  and  Mohan  VR,  Antitumour 



activity  of  Eugenia  floccosa  Bedd  and  Eugenia 

singampattiana  Bedd  leaves  against  Dalton  ascites 

lymphoma  in  swiss  albino  mice.  Int.  J.  PharmTech  Res,  3, 

2011, 1796-1800. 

4.

 



Kala 

SMJ, 


Tresina 

Soris 


and 


Mohan 

VR, 


Pharmacochemical  characterization  of  Eugenia  floccosa 

Bedd. J.Econ. Tax. Bot, 36, 2012a, 320-323. 

5.

 

Kala  SMJ,  Tresina  Soris  P  and  Mohan  VR,  Antioxidant, 



antihyperlipidaemic  and  antidiabetic  activity  of  Eugenia 

floccosa  Bedd  leaves  in  alloxan  induced  diabetic  rats.  J. 

Basic Clinic. Pharm, 3, 2012b, 235-240. 

6.

 

Tresina  PS,  Kala  SMJ,  and  Mohan  VR,  HPTLC  finger  print 



analysis  of  phytocompounds  and  in  vitro  antioxidant 

activity of Eugenia floccosa Bedd. Biosci. Discover, 3, 2012, 

296-311. 

7.

 



Brinda  P,  Sasikala  P  and    Purushothaman  KK, 

Pharmacognostic studies on Merugan kizhangu. Bull. Med. 

Ethnobot. Res, 3, 1981, 84-96. 

8.

 



Kala  MJS,  Balasubramanian  T,  Mohan  VR  and  Tresina  PS, 

Pharma 


chemical 

characterization 

of 

Eugenia 

singampattiana Bedd. Advan. BioRes, 1, 2010, 105-108. 

9.

 



Vasantha  K,  Priyavardhini  S,  Tresina  PS  and  Mohan  V, 

Phytochemical  analysis  and  antibacterial  activity  of 



Kedrostis  foetidissima  (Jacq.)  Cogn.  Biosci.Discover,  3,  

2012, 06-16 

10.

 

Priyavardhini  S,  Vasantha  K,  Tresina  PS  and  Mohan  VR, 



Efficacy  of  phytochemical  and  antibacterial  activity  of 

Corallocarpus  epigaeus  Hook.f.  Int.  J.  PharmTech  Res,  4, 

2012, 35-43.    

11.

 

OECD.  Organisation  for  Economic  co-operation  and 



Development).  OECD  guidelines  for  the  testing  of 

chemicals/Section 4: Health Effects Test No. 423; Acute oral 

Toxicity- Acute Toxic Class method. OECD. Paris. 2002.  

12.


 

Vane J and Booting R, Inflammation and the mechanism of 

action of anti-inflammatory drugs. J. Fed. Amer. Soc. Exper. 

Bio, 1, 1987, 89-96.   

13.

 

Kavimani S, Mounissamy VM and Gunasegaran R, Analgesic 



and anti-inflammatory activities of Hispidulir isolated from 

Helichrysum bracteatum. Ind. Drugs, 37,  2000, 582.  

14.


 

Nivsarkar  M,  Mukherjee  M,  Patel  M,  Padh  H  and  Bapu  C, 



Launaea  nudicaulis  leaf  juice  exhibits  anti-inflammatory 

action  in  centre  and  chronic  inflammation  models in  rats. 

Ind. Drugs, 39, 2002, 290. 

15.


 

Patil  VV  and  Patil  VR,  Evaluation  of  anti-inflammatory 

activity of Ficus cania Linn. leaves. Ind. J. Nat. Prod. Resour, 

2, 2011, 151-155. 

16.

 

Mascolo  N,  Autore  G,  Capasso  F,  Menghini  A  and  Fasulo 



MP, Biological screening of Italian medicinal plants for anti-

inflammatory activity. Phytother. Res, 1, 1987, 28-31. 

17.

 

Mary Jelastin Kala S, Tresina Soris P and Mohan VR, GC-MS 



determination of bioactive components of Eugenia flocossa 

Bedd. (Myrtaceae). Int. J. Pharma and Biosci, 3,  2011, 277-

282. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Source of Support: Nil, Conflict of Interest: None. 

 

 





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə