Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. (2016). 3(2): 163-169



Yüklə 220.85 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix15.08.2017
ölçüsü220.85 Kb.

Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. (2016). 3(2): 163-169

163


Research Article

Genetic Analysis of Eugenia singampattiana Bedd.- A Critically

Endangered Plant

Erkings Michael Y. and Dharmar K.

*

Research Department of Botany, Pasumpon Thiru Muthuramalinga Thevar Memorial College, Kamuthi-623 604,

Tamilnadu, India

*Corresponding author: dharmarsk@gmail.com



Abstract

The Molecular markers have been widely used in analysing genetic diversity of species for the conservation approach. Eugenia



singampattiana Bedd. is an endemic and critically endangered species in the Southern Western Ghats of India due to the loss of

habitat. There were 20 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers applied to find out genetic diversity among the

five existing populations. The Result showed that the genetic diversity (H) ranged from 0.13 to 0.28, the genetic diversity overall

groups  (H



T

)  on  an  average  was  0.39,  genetic  diversity  within  populations  (Hs)  was  0.31,  genetic  differentiation  (G



ST

)  between

populations overall loci was 0.26. Inter population gene flow (Nm) was 4.89. Highest percentage of polymorphism showed only

37.5%. This low percentage of polymorphism within the populations is attributed to small population size and reduced gene flow.

The result showed on evidence of the species become extinct due to loss of genetic richness among the population.

Keywords:

Genetic diversity, Eugenia singampattiana Bedd., RAPD, Critically endangered.



Introduction

The Western Ghats of India is one of the ecologically

sensitive zones in the World. It represents about 4000

species  of  flowering  plants  and  out  of  this,  nearly  38

percent  are  endemic  (Nair  and  Daniel,  1986).  This

high level of diversity and endemism has conferred as

the hot spots status (Johnsingh, 2001). Globally, there

are  229  plant  species  are  represented  as  threatened  in

the  Western  Ghats.  Among  these,  39  are  Critically

Endangered,  111  are  Endangered,  and  79  are

Vulnerable. Eugenia  singampattiana is  one  of  the

critically  endangered  endemic  species  based  on

population  size  reduction  of ≥90%  over  the  last  10

years or  three  generations  due  to  loss  of  habitat.  It

belongs  to  the  family  Myrtaceae.  It  is  a  small

evergreen  medicinal  tree  found  at  the  tail  end  of

Southern Western Ghats regions of Tamil Nadu.  The

plant  has  potential  activity  like  anticancerous,

antitumerous,  antioxidative,  antimicrobial,  antifungal,

anti inflammatory, antihyperlipidaemic and

antidiabetic  agents  (Viswanath

et  al.,

2014).


Therefore,  there  is  an  urgent  need  to  analyse  genetic

diversity  for  development  of  modern  conservation

system. Intra  species  variation  is  prerequisite  for

adaptive  change  for  long  term  conservation  of  the

species.

The  Molecular  markers  have  been  widely  used  in

analysing  genetic  diversity  and  to  find  out  highly

adaptive population (Warude et al., 2003). Polymerase

Chain  Reaction  (PCR)-based  methods  such  as  RAPD

marker  system  has  been  used  because  of  its  wide

usage  of  genetic  diversity  study  and  it  reflects  the

variation  of  the  whole  genomic  DNA.  It  would  be  a

better  parameter  to  measure  the  pattern  of  genetic

diversity of the rare and endangered plants (Lal et al.,

2011). Hence, the present study deals with the analysis

of genetic diversity of Eugenia singampattiana to find

out highly adaptive population for future conservation

approach.



SOI: http://s-o-i.org/1.15/ijarbs-2016-3-2-22

Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. (2016). 3(2): 163-169

164


Materials and Methods

Plant materials

The  plant  materials  were  collected  from  five  existing

populations  such  as  Inchikuzhi  (ES

1

),  Kannikatti



(ES

2

),  Oothu  (ES



3

),  Karaiyar  (ES

4

)  and  Kothaiyar



(ES

5

) . The plant was identified and checked with the



Herbarium  of  Jawaharlal  Nehru  Tropical  Botanical

Garden  and  Research  Institute  (JNTBGRI)  and  the

voucher 

specimen 

(Collection 

No.76845) 

was

deposited in JNTBGRI.



Fig 1. Habit of Eugenia singampattiana Bedd

DNA fingerprinting

Genomic DNA isolation and purification

The  total  genomic  DNA  was  extracted  using  the

modified  CTAB  method  (Doyle  and  Doyle,  1987)

from  tender  uninfected  leaf  samples  and  purified

according  to  the Sambrook  and  Russel  (2000).

Concentration  of  the  purified  genomic  DNA  in  each

case was adjusted to 10 ng/ µl in different aliquots and

stored at - 4° C for PCR amplification.



PCR reaction

Thirty 


RAPD 

primers 


were 

used 


for 

PCR


amplification  of  the  genomic  DNA  (Williams et  al.,

1990).  PCR  reactions  were  carried  out  in  a  final

volume  of  25  µl,  which  contained  2.5  µl  10X  taq

polymerase  buffer,  2.0  µl  of  deoxyribonucletides

(dNTPs),  3.5  µl  MgCl

2

,  0.1  µl  of  taq  DNA



polymerase, 2.0 µl of deca oligonucleotide primer, 2.0

µl of template DNA and 12.9 µl of sterile dis.H

2

0. The


reaction  mixture  was  subjected  to  programme  PCR-

amplification 

in 



Thermocycler 



(Eppendorf

mastercycler  nexus  gradient).  Amplification  process

contain,  initial  denaturation  of  DNA  at  95ºC  for  5

minutes,  denaturation  at 94ºC  for  30  seconds,

annealing at 35ºC for 1 minute and extension at 72ºC

for 2 minutes  followed by thirty five cycles and final

extension  at  72ºC  for  5  minutes.  The  amplified

products  are  stored  at  4ºC  till  electrophoresis.  The

PCR products were resolved by electrophoresis on 1.5

% agarose gel containing ethidium bromide along with

1 Kb ladder DNA as a standard molecular weight size

marker.  The  gels  were  visualized  under  UV

transilluminator.


Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. (2016). 3(2): 163-169

165


Data analysis

Amplification  profiles  of  populations  were  compared

with  each  other.  Genetic  similarity  matrix  among

populations of each samples were calculated using the

standard coefficient method (9). The dendrogram was

constructed  using  the  UPGMA  (Unweighed  Pair

Group Method with Arithmetic Average) (Sneath and

Sokal, 1973) algorithm in SHAN clustering module of

NTSYS-pc  software  version  1.5  (Rohlf,  1989 ).  The

genetic  diversity  within  and  between  populations

according to Nei’s formula (Nei, 1973) was calculated

using POPGENE package  version 1.31software (Yeh,



et al., 1999).

Results and Discussion

A  total  of  30  arbitrary  10-mer  primers  screened,  of

which  20  primers  produced  reproducible,  multiple

band  profiles  with  a  number of  amplified  DNA

fragments  that  varied  from  4  to  10.  A  sum  of  152

polymorphic  bands  was  observed.  The  size  of  the

RAPD fragments varied from 0.2 to 1.0 kbp (Plate 2).

Plate 2. RAPD-PCR fingerprinting of Eugenia singampattiana

Genetic  and  gene  diversity  measures  were  calculated

according  to  Nei’s  index  using  POPGENE  software

and  results  were  depicted  in  the  Table1.  The  mean

genetic  heterozygosity  or  diversity  (H)  ranged  from

0.1320 to 0.2863. The ES

1

population was found to be



least diverse (0.13). The ES

4

population displayed the



highest  level  of  variability  (0.28)  and  the  ES

3

population revealed intermediate diversity (0.14). The



observed  number  of  alleles  (Na)  ranged  from  1.3224

to  1.6250.  The  ES

2

population  was  found  to  be  least



diverse  (1.32).  The  ES

4

population  displayed  the



highest level of variability (1.62) and average was 1.4.

The mean effective number of alleles (Ne) was 1.3103.

The  highest  was  1.5433  in  ES

4

population  and  the



lowest  was  1.2375  in  ES

1

population



.

Shannon


Information  Index  (I)  ranged  from  0.1928  to  0.4052

and  the  average was  0.2431.  The  mean  number  of

polymorphic loci (NPL) was 53 and ranged from 49 to

57  for  all  the  accessionsThe  highest  percentage  of

polymorphism was 37.50 in ES

4

accession



.

Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. (2016). 3(2): 163-169

166


Table1. Analysis of polymorphism in different accessions of E. singampattiana

Accession

Na

Ne

H

I

NPL

% of polymorphism

ES

1



1.3355

1.2375


0.1320

0.1928


51

33.55


ES

2

1.3224



1.2468

0.1351


0.1949

49

32.24



ES

3

1.3421



1.2541

0.1400


0.2031

52

34.21



ES

4

1.6250



1.5433

0.2863


0.4052

57

37.50



ES

5

1.3750



1.2698

0.1506


0.2196

56

36.50



ES

1

– Inchikuzhi; ES



2

– Kannikatti; ES

3

– Oothu; ES



4

– Karaiyar; ES

5

– Kothyar



Na – Observed number of alleles; Ne – Effective number of alleles; – Gene diversity;

– Shannon Information Index; NPL – Number of Polymorphic Loci

The  overall  observed  and  effective  number  of  alleles

was  about  1.500  and  1.3365  respectively  and  the

overall  percentage  of  polymorphic  loci  was  50.  Nei’s

overall genetic diversity or heterozygosity was 0.1958.

The  genetic  distance  between  the  population  ranged

from 0.2117 to 0.4389 and the genetic identity ranged

from  0.6447  to  0.8092  (Table  2).  The  average  gene

diversity within populations (Hs) was 0.31, the highest

Hs was  0.35826  and  the  lowest Hs was  0.1453.  The

total diversity (H



T

) ranged from 0.2179 to 0.4835 and

the  average  was  0.3924.  The  mean  genetic

differentiation (G



ST

) between populations over all loci

was  0.26  and  the G

ST

ranged  from  0.1532  to  0.4620.

The gene frequency ranged from 0.7394 to 0.7527 and

the  average  was  0.7464. The  average  gene  flow  from

one  population  to  other  population  (Nm)  was  4.8989

while  the  lowest  was  0.6677  and  the  highest  were

21.88 (Table 3).

Table 2. Nei’s unbiased measures of Genetic distance and Genetic identity of E. singampattiana

Accession

ES

1

ES

2

ES

3

ES

4

ES

5

ES

1



****

0.7697


0.7632

0.7697


0.6447

ES

2



0.2617

****


0.8092

0.7763


0.7303

ES

3



0.2617

0.2117


****

0.7829


0.7237

ES

4



0.2617

0.2532


0.2448

****


0.7829

ES

5



0.4389

0.3144


0.3234

0.2448


****

Nei's genetic identity (above diagonal) and genetic distance (below diagonal)

In order to study the correlation between populations,

UPGMA  algorithm  was  used  to  draw  a  dendrogram

for the  five  populations  of E.  singampattiana (Fig  2).

A Jaccard’s matrix was used to produce a dendrogram

based  on  SI,  which  showed  distinct  separation  of the

collected  accessions  from  five  locations  into  two

major groups having 77 % similarity. Among the two

major  clusters,  the  accession  belonging  to  the  lower

cluster (LC) was collected from ES

3

, while accessions



belonging  to  the  upper  cluster  (UC)  were  collected

from ES


1

, ES


2

, ES


4

and ES


5

. Further the accessions of

the  UC  was  grouped  into  two  major  sub  clusters

(USC1  &USC2)  having  79  %  similarity.  The  upper

sub  cluster  1  (USC  1)  was  sub  divided  into  two  sub

clusters  USC1A  which  was  collected  from  ES

1

and


USC1B  collected  from  ES

2

having  83%  similarity.



USC2  was  sub  divided  into  two  sub  cluster  USC2A

collected  from  ES

4

and  USC2B  collected  from  ES



5

and they showed 93 % similarity.



Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. (2016). 3(2): 163-169

167


Fig 2. UPGMA dendrogram showing the genetic relationship of five populations of E. Singampattiana

Table.3 Genetic and gene diversity within and between the populations of E. singampattiana for

RAPD markers

S.No

Primers

Sequence 5’-3’

No. 

of

polymorphic

fragments

H

T

Hs

G

ST

Nm

Band

Frequency

1.

OPA 01


CAGGCCCTTC

4

0.4051



0.4987

0.3305


0.7166

0.7457


2

OPA03


AGTCAGCCAC

9

0.35758



0.2389

0.3615


1.1006

0.7471


3

OPA11


CAATCGCCGT

8

0.2179



0.1453

0.2494


3.5093

0.7436


4

OPA12


TCGGCGATAG

7

0.3026



0.2304

0.2455


2.1221

0.7468


5

OPA13


CAGCACCCAC

10

0.3518



0.3047

0.1532


6.3651

0.7476


6

OPB02


TGATCCCTGG

5

0.3314



0.2595

0.2500


3.4576

0.7447


7

OPB05


TGCGCCCTTC

7

0.4565



0.3692

0.1807


4.0933

0.7498


8

OPB08


GTCCACACGG

7

0.4130



0.2945

0.3420


2.8021

0.7481


9

OPB11


GTAGACCGGT

8

0.3684



0.2093

0.4538


2.5829

0.7452


10

OPB14


TCCGCTCTGG

6

0.4067



0.2152

0.4620


0.6677

0.7452


11

OPB20


GGACCCTTAC

9

0.4572



0.3402

0.2495


1.881

0.7453


12

OPH03


AGACGTCCAC

8

0.4189



0.3251

0.2196


2.9665

0.7464


13

OPH04


GGAAGTCGCC

8

0.3150



0.6898

0.3170


4.4826

0.7394


14

OPH06


ACGCATCGCA

9

0.4767



0.3751

0.2121


1.9300

0.7481


15

OPH09


TGTAGCTGGG

7

0.4424



0.3179

0.2747


1.8631

0.7441


16

OPX05


CCTTTCCTTC

7

0.4283



0.0226

0.0226


21.5831

0.7527


17

OPX08


CAGGGGTGGA

10

0.4492



0.3633

0.1909


17.5125

0.7471


18

OPX09


GGTCTGGTTG

7

0.4236



0.5826

0.2421


4.0929

0.7466


19

OPX12


CAGACAAGCC

8

0.4835



0.3275

0.3213


2.1254

0.7503


20

OPX15


CAGACAAGCC

8

0.3436



0.2588

0.2809


12.1254

0.7449


H

T

- Total diversity; Hs – Gene diversity within populationsG

ST

- Genetic differentiation; Nm – Gene flow

The  polymorphism  percentage  are    low  due  to  small

population  size

because    geographically  restricted

species showing lower levels of genetic variation than

widely distributed species (Hamrick and Godt 1996,).



Eugenia  singampattiana is  geographically  distributed

on only lat. l8°33’N to 8°42’46’’N and between long.

77°17’55’’E  to77°21’37’’E    with  two fragmented

population  (Gobalan  and  Henry,  2000).

These

narrowly 



distributed 

nature 


causes 

lower


polymorphism. Similarly  low  rate  of  polymorphism

was also reported (Catana et al., 2013, Bantawa et al.,

2011) in endangered plants. The habitat type is another

important  factor  shaping  the  degree  of  genetic

diversity  and  differentiation  (Shikano et  al., 2010).

Because  of  the  poor  knowledge  of  the  historical

distribution,  it  is  difficult  to  explain  the  historical

factors  that  may  have  contributed  to  the  low  genetic

variation in this species. This species grows on sandy


Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. (2016). 3(2): 163-169

168


clay  loam  with  a  pH  between  6  and  6.6  at slopes  in

different altitudes from 300 m to 900 m (Sarcar et al.,

2006). The average gene flow from one population to

other  population (Nm)  was  4.8989  and gene flow  can

occur through seed dispersal (Ellstrand, 1992). In field

observation,  number  of  seedlings  were  very  less

because  seed  germination  requires  65  to  85  days

(Sarcar


et  al.,

1999). The  low  percentage  of

polymorphism,  reduced  gene  flow due  to small

population size and loss of genetic richness among the

population are  molecular  evident  of  this  species

become extinct.



Conclusion

Analysis  of  RAPD  data  can  be  used  to  detect  genetic

variation  of E.  singampattiana.  It  showed  that  the

populations  which

exhibited  low  percentage  of

polymorphism, small  population  size,  reduced  gene

flow and other historical factors disclose the alarm of

species extinction. Among the natural populations, the

Karaiyar  (ES

4

)  accession  has possessed the  highest



percentage  of  polymorphism.  Hence,  this  population

can be adapted for the long term conservation through



ex-situ and in-situ approach.

Acknowledgments

The  authors  are  thankful  to  University  Grant

Commission (UGC), Government of India, New Delhi

for financial assistance under Major Research Project.



References

1. Bantawa,  P.,  Das  A.,  Ghosh,  P.D.  and  Mondal,T.

K.  2011.  Detection  of  natural  genetic  diversity  of

Gaultheria  fragrantissima  landraces  by  RAPDs:

An  endangered  woody  oil  bearing  plant  of  Indo-

China  Himalayas. Ind.  J.    Biotechnol. 10  :  294-

300.

2. Catana,R.,  Mitoi,  M.,  and  Ion,  R.  2013.  The



RAPD  techniques  used  to  assess  the  genetic

diversity in Draba dorneri, a critically endangered

plant 

species.


Advan. 

Biosci. 

Biotechnol.

4:164,169.

3. Doyle,  J.J.  and    Doyle  J.L.  1987. A  rapid  DNA

isolation  procedures  for  small  quantities  of  fresh

leaf tissues. Phytochem. 19: 11-15.

4. Ellstrand, N.C. 1992. Gene flow among seed plant

populations. New Forests. 6 :241-256.

5. Gobalan,  R.  and    Henry,  A.N.  2000.  Endemic

plants of India.,Bishen singh Mahendra Pal singh.,

DehraDun.178-180

6. Hamrick, 

J.L. 


and 

Godt, 


M.J.W. 

1996.


Conservation  genetics  of  endangered  plant

species. 

In: 

Avise  JC,Hamrick 



JL 

(eds),


Conservation  Genetics:  Case  Histories  from

Nature, Chapman & Hall, London. 281-304.

7. Johnsingh, 

A.J.T., 


2001. 

The 


Kalakad-

Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve: A global heritage of

biological diversity. Curr. Sci. 80: 378-388.

8. Lal  S., Kinnari  N., Mistry,  B.  P.,  Vaidya, D.S.  S.

and  Riddhi  A.  2011.Thaker  Genetic  Diversity

Among  Five  Economically  Important  Species  Of



Asparagus Collected From Central Gujarat (India)

Utilizing  RAPD  Markers  (Random  Amplification

of 

Polymorphic 



DNA).

Internat. 

J.Advan.

Biotechnol. Res. 2: 414-421.

9. Nair,  N.C.,  and  Daniel,  P.  1986.  The  floristic

diversity  of  the  Western  Ghats  and  its

conservation: A review. Proceedings of the Indian



Academy  of  Sciences  (Animal  Science/Plant

Science) Supplement, 127:163.

10. Nei, M.   and Li, M. 1979. Mathematical mode for

studying  genetic  variation  in  terms  of  restriction

endonucleases. Proc.  Natl.  Acad.  Sci. 76  :5269-

5273 .

11. Nei,  M.  1973.  Analysis  of  gene  diversity  in



subdivided  populations. Proc.  Nat.  Acad.  Sci.,

USA. 70 : 3321-3323.

12. Rohlf, 

R.J. 


1989. 

NTSYS-PC. 

Numerical

taxonomy  and  multivariate  analysis  system,

version, 1.50, Exeter Publication Ltd., New York.

13. Sambrook  and  Russell  2000.  Molecular  Cloning:

A Laboratory Manual. Third Edi. CSHL. 78-85 .

14. Sanal  C.,  Viswanath  ,  V.B.  Sreekumar,    P.

Sujanapal,  R.  Suganthasakthivel,  and  Sreejith,

K.A.  2014. Eugenia  singampattiana Beddome:  a

critically endangered medicinal tree from Southern

Western Ghats, India. J. Pharmaco. Phytochem. 3

:178, 182.

15.Sarcar,  M.K.,    Gobalan,  R.    and  Chelladurai,  V.

1999.    Floral  study  from  Karaiyar  to  kannikatti

Forst  rest  house.  Kalakad  Mundandurai  Tiger

reserve (KMTR)., Tirunelvelli.

16.Sarcar,  M.K.,Sarcar,  A.B.,  and  Chelladurai,  V.

2006. 

Rehabilitation 



approach 

for


Eugenia

singampattiana

Beddome-


an  endemic  and

critically  endangered  tree  species  of  Southern

tropical  evergreen  forest  in  India., Curr.  Sci., 91

(4): 472-481.



Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. (2016). 3(2): 163-169

169


17.Shikano,  T.,    Shimada,  Y.,    Herczeg,  G.  and

Merila, J. 2010. History vs. habitat type: explaining

the  genetic  structure  of  european  nine-spined

stickleback  (Pungitius  pungitius)  populations.



Molecul. Ecol. 19 :1147-1161.

18.Sneath,  P.H.A.  and    Sokal,  R.R.  1973. Numerical

Taxonomy, WH  Freeman  and  Company,  San

Francisco.

19.Warude, D., Chavan, P., Joshi, K. and  Patwardhan,

B.    2003.  DNA  isolation  from  fresh  and  dry

samples  with  highly  acidic  tissue  extracts, Plant

Mol. Biol. Report. 21: 467a-467f.

20.Williams, J.G.K.,  Kubelik, A.R.,  K.J. Livak, and

Rafalski, 

J.A. 


1990.

DNA 


polymorphisms

amplified by arbitrary primers are useful as genetic

markers. Nucl. Acids Res. 18 : 6531-6535.

21.Yeh,  F.C., Yang,  R.C.,  Boyle,  T.J.B.,    Ye,  Z.H.,

and  Mao, J.X. 1999.  POPGENE, the user-friendly

shareware 

for 

population 



genetic 

analysis.

Molecular  Biology  and  Biotechnology  Centre.

University of Alberta. Canada.



Access this Article in Online

Website:

www.ijarbs.com

Subject:

Plant Genetics

Quick Response

Code

How to cite this article:

Erkings Michael Y. and Dharmar K. (2016). Genetic Analysis of Eugenia singampattiana Bedd.-

A Critically Endangered Plant . Int. J. Adv. Res. Biol. Sci. 3(2): 163-169.


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə