Health problems related to breeding



Yüklə 100.27 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix29.12.2016
ölçüsü100.27 Kb.

                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 1

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 

 



What causes ewes to abort?

 

 



 

 



The exact cause of abortion requires the knowledge of clinical signs, 

flock history and, in some cases, laboratory diagnostics. 

 

Samples (fetus, placenta) can be submitted to your veterinarian  



for diagnosis. 

 

 



What are the different types of abortions?

 

 



 

 



Enzootic Abortion:  

o

 



Caused by Chlamydia psittici.  

o

 



Spreads through infected (aborted) fetuses, placentas, 

vaginal discharges and feces of carriers.  

o

 

Enters a non-pregnant ewe and lays dormant, accumulating 



in the placenta until the ewe conceives. 

o

 



The organism does not initiate an immune response during 

the dormant stage. 

o

 

During pregnancy, the organism enters the uterus and 



causes inflammation of the placenta and death of the fetus.  

o

 



Placenta is often severely damaged and may be retained; 

membranes are opaque, reddened and thick. 

o

 

If infection occurs before conception, the ewe will abort 



during mid-pregnancy.  

o

 



If infection occurs during early pregnancy, abortion will 

occur 60 to 90 days thereafter.  

o

 

If infection occurs during mid or late pregnancy, stillbirths 



and weak lambs at birth may result.  

o

 



Newly purchased ewes and ewe lambs are most susceptible 

in contaminated farms. 

o

 

Recovered ewes are usually resistant for two to three years. 



o

 

Ewe usually only aborts once in her lifetime; but may 



remain a carrier. 

o

 



Infected ewe may have a normal lamb, but spread the 

bacteria when stressed.  

o

 

A vaccine is available and generally considered to be 



effective in sheep.  

The exact cause of 

abortion requires the 

knowledge of clinical 

signs, flock history and

 in some cases,  

laboratory diagnostics. 

 

                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 2

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 

o



 

Crowding at lambing increases the risk of abortion in the 

same or subsequent lambing season. 

o

 



No effective way to identify infected or carrier animals. 

o

 



Control measures:   

 



Accurate diagnosis. 

 



Good hygiene (e.g. isolation of aborting ewes and 

disinfecting infected pens). 

 

Vibriosis Abortion: 



o

 

CampylobacterCampylobacter jejuni.  

o

 

Ewes become infected by ingesting infected membranes or 



fluids or through consumption of feeds contaminated with 

Campylobacter sp.  

o

 



If infection occurs during early pregnancy, the ewe likely 

will reabsorb the fetus.  

o

 

If infection occurs during mid-pregnancy, abortion will 



occur 10 to 20 days later.  

o

 



Abortion rates may reach 80-90% in a previously  

unexposed flock.  

o

 

A late-pregnancy infection will result in stillbirths and weak 



lambs at birth.  

o

 



Infected ewes generally recover following abortion and can 

be expected to be immune to re-infection for several years.  

o

 

Some ewes die of complications such as infected uterus or 



fetal/placental retentions. 

o

 



New and young ewes most likely to abort in flocks with a 

history of vibrio. 

o

 

Clean flocks should be vaccinated if replacement ewes are 



purchased from other flocks. 

o

 



Replacements should be vaccinated when brought into a 

flock of vibrio carriers. 

o

 

Vaccinate just prior to flushing, breeding or at  



weaning time. 

 



Toxoplasmosis Abortion:  

o

 



Caused by Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoa that causes 

coccidiosis in cats.  

o

 

Ewes become infected by ingesting feed or water that has 



been contaminated with oocyst-laden cat feces.  

o

 



In healthy, non-pregnant ewes, toxoplasmosis will not 

cause clinical symptoms or detrimental effects. 

o

 

If infection occurs during early pregnancy, the embryo or 



fetus generally will be reabsorbed.  

                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 3

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 

o



 

If infection occurs during mid-pregnancy, abortion will 

occur and the ewe may be susceptible to a  

secondary infection.  

o

 

During late pregnancy, infection will lead to abortion, 



stillbirths, mummified fetuses or weak lambs at birth.  

o

 



In stressed and immune-suppressed ewes, neurological 

signs and death occur on rare occasions. 

o

 

Risk of infection is greatly reduced by preventing 



contamination of sheep feed with cat feces. 

o

 



Keeping cats out of the sheep barns to prevent 

toxoplasmosis must be weighed against the benefits  

of rodent control.  

 



Salmonella Abortion:  

o

 



Occurrence is rare.  

o

 



Caused by various salmonella organisms.  

o

 



Stress and the number of ingested salmonella bacteria will 

determine whether the pregnant ewe aborts.  

o

 

If abortion does occur, it usually is during the final month  



of pregnancy.  

o

 



Most of the ewes will exhibit diarrhea.  

o

 



Some will die from metritis, peritonitis and/or septicemia.  

o

 



Healthy, young lambs also may contract the disease  

and die.  

o

 

Ewes that have aborted are immune but can carry and shed 



bacteria for up to four months.  

 

 



What is vaginal prolapse (VP)?

 

 



 

 



In the last two to three weeks prior to lambing, a producer may notice 

a pink to reddish swelling just below the anus, sometimes only when 

the ewe is recumbent but eventually at all times.  

 



This swelling is inflamed vaginal tissue which, if the ewe continues to 

strain, will prolapse. 

 

In severe cases, the bladder will be contained inside the swelling 



preventing the ewe from urinating properly, and the cervix may be 

visible as a red knot centrally and low on the mass. 

 

In very severe cases, the rectum may also prolapse.   



 

Ewes with even a mild VP 

one year are almost 

certain to re-prolapse the 

following year and so 

should be culled after 

weaning their lambs. 

 

                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 4

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 

 



What factors contribute to vaginal prolapse?

 

 



 

 



Age may be a factor of VP, but this is somewhat complicated by the 

flock level risk factors. 

 

Outbreaks of VP are often more common in ewe lambs – possibly due 



to their small size and body capacity compared to adults, but older 

ewes may be more at risk because of “wear and tear.”  

 

Body condition has been associated with a higher risk, with fat ewes or 



ewes being overfed having a higher risk. 

 



Fetal numbers has been implicated with ewes bearing twins more at 

risk than ewes bearing singles – but this may be again related to body 

capacity and size of the ewe. 

 



Ewes with even a mild VP one year are almost certain to re-prolapse 

the following year and so should be culled after weaning their lambs. 

 

Genetics has been suspected but very little research has been 



published in this regard and only in a few breeds. 

 



Outbreaks of VP are strongly associated with diet and  

feeding management. 

 

Forages that are of poor digestibility is the most common cause of VP.   



 

Over-conditioned sheep offered free-choice forage will increase their 



dry matter intake in late pregnancy. When they lie down, there is a 

lack of room from the enlarged rumen and uterus containing the 

fetuses. Once the vaginal tissue becomes irritated due to exposure to 

the air or environment, the ewe will strain and eventually prolapse. 

 

Feeds containing estrogenic compounds (phytoestrogens) are also 



postulated as contributing to outbreaks of VP. These compounds cause 

a softening of the ligaments and swelling of the tissues in the vulvar 

area.  When the ewe is recumbent, again the vaginal tissue protrudes 

and is irritated. Feeds associated with phytoestrogens include red 

clover hay or haylage, disease stressed alfalfa and grains affected by 

the mycotoxin zearalenone. More research is needed to confirm  

this association. 

 



Diets that contain a high percentage of the forage source as alfalfa or 

red clover, or in which the forage is of poor quality should be avoided.  

A source of energy, i.e. grain should be offered to also avoid  

pregnancy toxaemia. 

 

Animals kept in confinement and unable to exercise may also be more 



susceptible. 

 



Feeder design and management is also important. Crowding at the 

feeders or ewes forced to stand on their hind legs to feed out of 



                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 5

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 

elevated hay racks during late gestation may have a higher incidence  



of prolapsed vagina.  

 

 



How should I treat a VP?

 

 



 

 



VPs should not be ignored. 

 



Early cases may only appear when the animal is lying down and these 

should be monitored for progression.  

 

It is advisable to have prolapses corrected within 24 hours of their 



appearance so as to prevent excessive straining and permanent 

damage to the vagina.  

 

A veterinarian can be called to replace the prolapse and suture the 



vulva closed.  

 



Once this has been done, the female must be watched closely for signs 

of birthing and the suture untied when lambing is imminent.  

 

If the female does not lamb when expected the suture can often be 



retied and close observation should be continued.  

 



Control of prolapsed vaginas should be based on culling affected ewes 

after weaning and not keeping any of their offspring as replacements.  

 

 

What is pregnancy toxaemia?



 

 

 



 

Pregnancy toxemia (pregnancy ketosis) usually occurs in the last few 



weeks of pregnancy when the fetal growth and nutritional needs of the 

ewe is at a maximum. 

 

The cause is very simple – affected sheep are not consuming enough 



energy to meet the growing needs of the fetus(es).  

 



Pregnant ewes carrying multiple fetuses require more than double the 

feed energy as those carrying singletons.  

 

Ewes that are already thin when entering late gestation are at 



increased risk than ewes in good body condition. Ewes that are over-

conditioned are also at risk of pregnancy toxaemia, although they do 

not respond well to treatment and are more likely to die than  

thin ewes. 

 

Initially, the signs are subtle – ewes are still eating forage but not grain, 



and will separate from the group but may still appear bright. They will 

quickly become more depressed and if left untreated will progress to a 

coma and death.  

Pregnant ewes carrying 

multiple fetuses require 

more than double the  

feed energy as those 

carrying singletons. 

 


                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 6

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 



 

Because glucose levels are low in the blood and the brain, the ewe may 

show neurological signs which are: walking with her head held 

abnormally high, stumbling, having a fine head tremor and appearing 

blind. She has a severe headache and may grind her teeth and press 

her head against the wall. At this point, she is not eating at all. 

 

Normally, the ewe obtains energy mostly from the ration and much 



less from her fat stores. If that energy is not coming from the feed, she 

will mobilize fat and process it through her liver. This process produces 

by-products called ketones of which the most common is  

β-hydroxybutyrate, which can be measured in the blood and urine.  

The fat clogs up the liver and causes liver failure – causing more 

depression. Brain damage eventually becomes irreversible and she 

slips into a coma. The fetuses die, decompose and the ewe also 

becomes toxic. All of these factors contribute to her death. 

 

Animals displaying any of these signs should be examined by a 



veterinarian. Once a ewe enters a coma, it is unlikely she will respond 

to any treatment as the liver and brain are severely damaged. It is 

important to intervene when she still has some appetite and is  

treated appropriately.  

 

Similar signs may occur with other diseases including hypocalcemia,  



polioencephalmalacia and some other toxicities such as lead poisoning. 

 



Prevention of pregnancy toxaemia is based on proper feeding of ewes 

in late pregnancy and also controlling any diseases or management 

issues that will cause a ewe not to be able to eat properly or will 

increase her energy needs (e.g. footrot, bad teeth, inclement weather, 

shearing, crowded feeders, mixing of ages and sizes).  

 



Efforts should be made to ensure that all pregnant females have 

adequate body condition as they enter late gestation (3 to 4 on a  

5-point scale).  

 

 



What is hypocalcaemia?

 

 



 

 



Calcium is in great demand by the ewe in late pregnancy because the 

fetal skeletons are being formed.   

 

If the diet is low in calcium (e.g. cereal hays such as oat hay have 



almost no calcium), or if the diet is very high in phosphorus (e.g. high 

grain diet with very poor quality “first cut” grassy hay), then the ewe 

will not have enough calcium in the diet to stay healthy.   

 



Any other stress (e.g. shearing, transportation, inclement weather) will 

tip her over the edge. 



                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 7

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 



 

The muscles need calcium to contract. Low calcium causes the ewe to 

be unsteady on her feet and eventually she cannot rise. She is cold, 

bloated, salivating and her hind legs are most often out behind her 

rather than tucked up. 

 



Untreated she will die due to heart failure or aspiration of rumen 

contents from bloating. 

 

The disease can look very much like pregnancy toxaemia but the onset 



is often more rapid. 

 



This is a medical emergency; a veterinarian can administer calcium 

salts into the blood stream to save her life. But a misdiagnosis, or if the 

calcium is given to a sheep with another disease, it can stop her heart. 

 



Make sure that the forage is of good quality (a balance of legumes and 

grasses) and digestible. 

 

 

What 



health problems may impact a ram’s 

ability to breed?

 

 

 



 

Ram epididymitis is the name given to a disease syndrome in which 



specific bacteria cause inflammation of the epididymis or tube which 

connects the testicles to the urethra and is responsible for  

sperm transport.  

 



One type is caused by a group of organisms that include Histophilus 

and Actinobacillus. They are opportunistic bacteria and often called 

lamb epididymitis as it is more common in young rams.   

 



The other is Brucella ovis and is more problematic as the ewes can be a 

reservoir of infection. Both causes result in reduced fertility in both the 

ram and ewe and are spread by veneral transmission. 

 



Fortunately B. ovis is rare in western Canada and likely absent in 

central and eastern Canada. 

 

Chronic infections with B. ovis – not related to brucellosis in cattle and 



bison – causes damage to the epididymis so that sperm cannot be 

ejaculated properly. Fertility is reduced or is absent. 

 

Signs within a flock include non-pregnant ewes, a decreased number of 



lambs born per ewe, abortions, the birth of weak lambs and a longer 

lambing season.  

 

Typical signs of an infected ram include lumps or swellings within the 



epididymis, but often there is nothing detected on examination and  

a blood test must be used to absolutely rule this disease out.  

 

There is no treatment and control is achieved by culling all 



infected rams.  

Hypocalcaemia is  

a medical emergency;  

a veterinarian can 

administer calcium salts 

into the blood stream  

to save her life. 

 

                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 8

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 

 



 

What is balanoposthitis (pizzle rot, sheath rot)?

 

 

 



 

Balanoposthitis is a painful inflammation involving the prepuce and 



penis and is most commonly seen in rams being fitted for show or sale. 

 



Affected rams rarely want to breed because of the discomfort.  

 



The tissue is inflamed with a yellowish purulent exudate which without 

treatment will lead to scarring and the inability to breed.  

 

The cause is feeding too much protein (> 14%), which leads to 



excretion of high amounts of urea in the urine. The bacteria 

Corynebacterium renale grows in the urea leading to severe infection. 

 



Treatment is changing the diet and washing the penis and prepuce 

with mild astringents and applying antibiotic salves. If scarring is 

severe, surgery is required to correct this – leading to a long  

recovery time.  

 

Feeding more grass hay verses high protein legume hay will prevent 



the problem from occurring. 

 

 



What is testicular hypoplasia?

 

 



 

 



Testicular hypoplasia means that the testes are much smaller in size 

than what is expected for a normal breeding age ram. 

 

This can be congenital, i.e. the ram never has normal-sized testicles, or 



can be acquired from injury or disease. 

 



Hypoplastic testes have reduced sperm production capacity or may not 

be capable of producing sperm at all.  

 

Sperm morphology is often abnormal in affected males.  



 

Rams with only one testicle are not desirable for breeding purposes. 



Selection for rams with adequate testicular size will go a long way 

toward establishing a fertile flock. 

 

 

References



 

 

 



Sheep and Goat Management in Alberta; Reproduction Chapter  

Alberta Lamb Producers and Alberta Goat Breeders Association, 2009 

http://www.ablamb.ca/producer_mgmt/sheep_goat_mgmt.html 


                        HEALTH PROBLEMS RELATED TO BREEDING 

SECTION 8

 

Page 9

  

   

 

              

Section 8

 

 

Abortions in Sheep Causes, Control and Prevention  

Justin S. Luther, NDSU Extension, 2006 

http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/ansci/sheep/as1317w.htm 



 

Introduction to Sheep Production Manual  

Ontario Sheep Marketing Agency 

http://www.ontariosheep.org/Intro%20to%20Sheep%20Production/6.%20Reproduction%20and%20Lambing.pdf

 

 



Infectious Causes of Abortion in Ewes 

Susan Schoenian, Western Maryland Research and Education Center, 2000 

http://www.sheepandgoat.com/articles/abortion.html 

 

Sheep Health and Management  

Thomas Thedford, Joe Hughes, Bill Crutcher and Gerald Fitch, Oklahoma 

Cooperative Extension Service  

http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-2146/ANSI-3860web.pdf

 

 



 

Каталог: user
user -> Penitensiar sistemdə Vərəmə nəzarət üzrə TƏLİmat
user -> Рабочая учебная программа дисциплины «эндодонтия» для специальности 060201. 65 «Стоматология» Всего зет 6 Всего часов 216, из них
user -> Рабочая учебная программа дисциплины «пародонтология» для специальности 060201. 65 «Стоматология» Всего зет 4
user -> Dunedin study of all children born in 1972, to age 21
user -> Kafedra: “Biznesin təşkili və idarə olunması” Fənn: “Antiböhranlı idarəetmə” Müəllim: Nəbiyev Aydın Xalıq oğlu
user -> Concept The 8th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns Call for Contributions
user -> Şəhərsalmanın əsasları” fənnindən testlər


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə