Experimental study



Yüklə 1.04 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix05.08.2017
ölçüsü1.04 Mb.

JTCM

|

www. journaltcm. com

February 15, 2013

|

volume 33



|

Issue 1


|

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Online Submissions: http://www.journaltcm.com

J Tradit Chin Med 2013 February 15; 33(1): 119-124

info@journaltcm.com

ISSN 0255-2922

© 2013 JTCM. All rights reserved.



Microbial and heavy metal contamination in commonly consumed

traditional Chinese herbal medicines

Adelinesuyien Ting, Yiingyng Chow, Weishang Tan

aa

Adelinesuyien Ting, Yiingyng Chow, Weishang Tan,

School of Science, Monash University Sunway Campus, Ja-

lan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, 46150 Petaling Jaya, Se-

langor, Malaysia



Supported by Monash University Sunway Campus

Correspondence to: Prof. Adelinesuyien Ting, School of

Science, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon

Selatan, 46150 Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malay-

sia. adelsuyien@yahoo.com; adeline.ting@monash.edu



Telephone: +86-603-5514 6105

Accepted: October 6, 2012

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The increasing popularity and wide-

spread use of traditional Chinese herbs as alterna-

tive medicine have sparked an interest in under-

standing their biosafety, especially in decoctions

that are consumed. This study aimed to assess the

level of microbial and heavy metal contamination

in commonly consumed herbal medicine in Malay-

sia and the effects of boiling on these contamina-

tion levels.

METHODS: Four commonly consumed Chinese

herbal medicine in Malaysia-"Eight Treasure Herbal

Tea", "Herbal Tea", Xiyangshen (Radix Panacis Quin-

quefolii) and Dangshen (Radix Codonopsis) were

evaluated in this study. Herbal medicines were pre-

pared as boiled and non-boiled decoctions, and

their microbial enumeration and heavy metal de-

tection were conducted with plate assay and atom-

ic absorption spectroscopy, respectively.

RESULTS: Findings revealed that herbal medicines

generally had 6 log

10

cfu/mL microbial cells and that



boiling had significantly reduced microbial contam-

inants, where no Bacillus spp., Staphylococcus spp.

and Clostridium spp. were recovered. Heavy metals

such as Mn, Cu, Cd, Pb, Fe and Zn were also detect-

ed from all the samples, generally in low concentra-

tions (<1 mg/L) except for Mn (18.545 mg/L). All de-

coctions (after boiling) have reduced concentra-

tions of Cu, while others were not significantly dif-

ferent. Comparisons between samples with single

and multi-herbs suggest level of microbial and met-

al contamination is not influenced by number of

herbs in sample.



CONCLUSION: Herbal medicines generally have mi-

crobial and heavy metal contaminants. However,

the boiling process to generate decoctions was

able to successfully reduce the number of microbes

and Cu, ensuring safety of herbal medicines for con-

sumption.

© 2013 JTCM. All rights reserved.

Key words: Decoction processing; Drug contamina-

tion; Heavy metal poisoning, nervous system; Mi-

crobial consortia; Drugs, Chinese herbal

INTRODUCTION

The use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) as a nat-

ural remedy is a common practice among the Chinese

communities. This practice has slowly transcended to

other cultures especially with the introduction of Tradi-

tional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as alternative medi-

cine. The World Health Organization (WHO) report-

ed that 70% to 80% of the world population uses herb-

al medicine for primary healthcare.

1

In Singapore, a



country dominated by Chinese communities, 89% of

the children have consumed CHMs in the first 30

months of their life.

2

The high demand for CHMs is



119

JTCM

|

www. journaltcm. com

February 15, 2013

|

volume 33



|

Issue 1


|

Ting ASY et al. / Experimental Study

attributed to the generalized perception that CHMs

are natural, thus safer compared to synthetic drugs.

3

In

addition, CHMs are reportedly able to cure diseases



which are resistant to synthetic drugs such as the use of

Zemaphyte, a combination of 10 different CHMs, for

atopic eczema.

4

CHMs are also known to be easily ab-



sorbed by the human body.

5

Although the popularity of CHMs grew among the



consumers, regulations on the biosafety, production

and preparation of CHMs is very lacking.

6

Biosafety



testing on CHMs to evaluate microbial and metal con-

tamination levels are mostly absent from the monitor-

ing and regulatory exercise. In fact, tests are only con-

ducted when toxicity cases are reported. Although mi-

crobial contamination can be reduced by boiling, some

bacterial endospores and fungal spores still persist, caus-

ing health hazards.

7

There were reports that Rhodiola



root extracts in a well-known herbal product, was con-

taminated by Bacillus subtilis, causing liver damage in

consumers.

8

Aflatoxin from Aspergillu ssp., commonly



detected in CHMs such as Yuejebaohe Wan and Feier

Pian,


9

is another example of common hazard in the use

fo CHMs. It is therefore crucial to determine and un-

derstand the level of microbial contamination in

CHMs.

Heavy metal contamination in CHMs is also prevalent



and has been found in CHMs such as Radix codonopsis

and R. angelicae Sinensis, contaminated with lead and

arsenic, respectively.

10

In addition, Mn, Cu, Cd, Fe,



and Zn are also detected in a screening test done using

2080 CHMs samples, with 42 of these samples having

levels exceeding the permissible legal limits.

2

Unlike mi-



crobial contamination, heavy metal residues will persist

in the CHMs even after boiling, causing heavy metal

poisoning.

11

Therefore, it is crucial to determine the lev-



els of heavy metals in the CHMs before decoction to

evaluate biosafety of CHMs.

In our study, we aimed to evaluate the microbial and

heavy metal levels in four of the most common CHMs

consumed by the local Chinese community in Malay-

sia. These CHMs were recommended by practitioners

of CHM in Malaysia. As microbial and heavy metal

levels may differ prior to and after boiling, we evaluat-

ed this as well to determine the impact of boiling and

the biosafety of decoctions for consumption.



MATERIALS AND METHODS

"Eight treasure herbal tea" (CHM1), "Herbal tea"

(CHM2), "Xiyangshen root" (CHM3) and "Dangshen

root" (CHM4) were bought randomly from two shops.

One was designated as shop A (Taman Midah, Cheras,

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia) and the other as shop B (Ta-

man Dahlia, Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia). To re-

spect privacy, both shops have requested for anonymi-

ty. The samples were then labelled accordingly, i.e.

CHM1A to indicate herbal medicine sample 1 from

shop A whereas CHM1B to indicate herbal medicine

sample 1 from shop B. The composition of herbs in

each sample is provided in Table 1A, B, C and D. For

each sample, individual herbs were cut into pieces mea-

suring 1 cm × 1 cm, pooled together and subsequently

distributed equally for the microbial assay and heavy

metal determination.

Determination of microbial contaminants in CHMs

For sample CHM1A, 1g of the sample was mixed with

9mL sterile distilled water in a 50 mL Schott bottle.

The Schott bottle was then agitated on a rotary shaker

(250 rpm) for 1 h, at room temperature (27

℃±3℃).


Latin name

Spica Prunellae Vulgaris

12

Herba Lophatheri

13

Rhizoma Imperatae

12

Flos Bombacis

14

Herba Plantaginis

12

Folium Mori

12

Saccharumofficinarum L.

13

Flos Dendranthematis

2

Chinese Pinyin name



Xiakucao

Danzhuye


Baimaogen

Mumianhua

Cheqiancao

Sangye


Ganzhegan

Juhua


Table 1A Latin and Chinese Pinyin names of herbal plants in

"Eight Treasure Herbal Tea" [CHM1 (A and B)]

Latin name

Herba Schizonepetate Tenuifolia

15

Radix Saposhnikoviae

16

Notopeteryginm Incisum

15

Radix Angelicaepubescentis

15

Rhizoma Chuanxiong

17

Radix Bupleuri Chinensis

15

Radix Peucedani

13

Scutellaria Baicalensis Georgi.

15

Radix Ilicis Asprellae

18

Fructus Aurantii Submaturus

15

Poria

15

Radix Glycyrrhizae

15

Chinese



Pinyin name

Jingjie


Fangfeng

Jianghuo


Duhuo

Chuanxiong

Chaihu

Qianhu


Huangjing

Gangmeigen

Zhike

Fuling


Gancao

Table 1B Latin and Chinese Pinyin names of herbal plant

parts used for "Herbal Tea" [CHM2 (A and B)]

Latin name



Radix Panacis Quinquefolii

19

Chinese Pinyin name



Xiyangshen

Table 1C Latin and Chinese Pinyin names of herbal plant

parts used for "Xiyangshen" [CHM3 (A and B)]

Latin name



Radix Codonopsis

13

Chinese Pinyin name



Dangshen

Table 1D Latin name and Chinese common names of herbal

plant parts used for "Dangshen root" [CHM4 (A and B)]

120


Ting ASY et al. / Experimental Study

JTCM


|

www. journaltcm. com

February 15, 2013

|

volume 33



|

Issue 1


|

The mixture was then serially diluted (10

-1

to 10


-6

). Ali-


quots (0.1 mL) from dilution factors 10

-2

, 10



-4

and 10


-6

were spread-plated onto the following agar plates; Nu-

trient agar (NA), HiCrome

TM

Bacillus Agar, Mannitol-



Salt Agar (MSA), Reinforced Clostridial Agar (RCA),

and Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA). Triplicates were pre-

pared. All agar plates (except RCA) were incubated in

aerobic condition at room temperature (27

℃±3℃) for

24 h. The RCA plates were incubated in an anaerobic

jar at room temperature (27

℃±3℃) for 24 h. Negative

controls using 0.1mL of sterilized distilled water were

spread-plated on all agar plates. Observation was made

after 4 days of incubation. Procedure was repeated for

samples CHM2A, CHM3A, CHM4A and all samples

for shop B. For the effect of boiling on microbial con-

taminants in CHMs, the samples were boiled at 100

for 1 h and described procedures repeated.



Characterization of microbial contaminants

The microbial contaminants were characterized based

on their cultural and morphological morphologies on

the selective and differential agar used. Fungal contami-

nants were identified based on their spores structures

stained with Lactophenol Cotton Blue.



Quantification of heavy metals from CHMs

For sample CHM1A, 10 g of the sample was added in-

to 200 mL of sterile distilled water in a 500 mL Schott

bottle. Triplicates were prepared. The bottles were then

agitated on a rotary shaker (250 rpm) for 1h, at room

temperature (27

℃ ± 3℃ ) to allow the samples to mix

well. The mixture was then filtered using the Aspirator

A-3S EYELA vacuum pump. The collected herbal solu-

tions were then analyzed using PerkinElmer AAnalyst

100 atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for their

manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), cadmium

(Cd), zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) contents. Operational pa-

rameters are summarized in Table 2. Since the AAS

maximum detection limit is 20 ppm, a series of stan-

dard solution was prepared (4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 ppm).

The absorbance readings obtained were then calculated

using the equations generated from the standard curves

for each metal. For assay of boiled decoction, the herb-

al samples were boiled at 100

℃ for 1 h prior to heavy

metal quantification using similar procedures. Proce-

dure was also repeated for analysis of samples from

shop B.


Statistical analysis

The data was analysed with Statistical Package for the

Social Sciences (SPSS), version 18.0. T-test, one way

analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's studentized

range test were applied accordingly. Difference was con-

sidered significant at P<0.05.



RESULTS

Prior to boiling, microbial contamination was present

in all samples except CHM3A. These samples had be-

tween 4 to 6 log

10

cfu/mL microbial cells detected



which were reduced to 0 log

10

cfu/mL after boiling (Fig-



ure 1). This observation was consistent for all samples

except sample CHM4B enumerated on NA. For this

sample, 4.9 log

10

cfu/mL of bacterial cells were recov-



ered from boiled decoctions, although none were the

endospore forming Bacillus and Clostridium, as well as



Staphylococcus spp. (Figure 1). Comparison among the

three genera showed Bacillus spp. as the most prevalent

bacteria, detected from 7 of the 8 samples. The least

common bacteria recovered was the Clostridium spp.,

with only 2 samples (CHM3B, CHM4B) having these

bacteria, which coincidently was from the same shop

(Figure 1). Staphylocoocus spp. was also less prevalent

compared to Bacillus spp., detected only in samples

CHM1 and CHM2, obtained from both shops A and

B. Fungal contaminants were also prevalent in 6 of the

8 tested samples. This study also showed that a sample

of CHM was able to have many types of contamina-

tion. We also observed that there was no significant dif-

ference in number of contaminants recovered from

samples with single herbal species (CHM3, CHM4)

compared to CHMs with multiple herbal species

(CHM1, CHM2) on all agar tested. However, we noted

with interest that Clostridium contamination was ob-

served in two of the four samples obtained from shop B,

with both these samples having only a single type of herb.

The use of BHicrome agar, RCA and MSA were

helpful to determine the contaminants based on their

ability to grow on these media. Two species of Bacil-

lus were detected as a result of colony pigmentation

on BHiCrome agar. B. subtilis formed dark green,

flat colonies; while B. coagulans formed pink, small

raised colonies. Two common species of Staphylococ-



cus were also recovered from the samples; S. aureus

and S. epidermidis, which showed typical pink and

yellow colonies on MSA, respectively. The fungal iso-

late was identified as Aspergillu ssp. based on the for-

mation of conidia.

Of the 6 metals assessed, Mn had the highest concen-

tration detected from the CHMs samples with

1.394-18.545 mg/L, while Cd had the least amount de-

Element

Mn

Pb



Cu

Cd

Fe



Zn

Lamp current

(mA)

20

10



15

4

20



15

Wavelength

(nm)

279.5


283.3

324.8


228,8

248.3


213.9

Slit


(nm)

0.2


0.7

0.7


0.7

0.2


0.7

Table 2 AAS parameters and furnace temperature program

for determination of heavy metals

Notes: AAS: atomic absorption spectroscopy; Mn: manganese;

Pb: lead; Cu: copper; Cd: cadmium; Zn: zinc; Fe: iron.

121


JTCM

|

www. journaltcm. com

February 15, 2013

|

volume 33



|

Issue 1


|

Ting ASY et al. / Experimental Study

tected (0.105-.314 mg/L). Other metals such as Cu,

Pb, Fe, and Zn, were all <3 mg/L (Figure 2). All

these metals were found in all samples tested, with

CHM4A generally having higher concentrations of

Mn, Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn; while sample CHM1B

had the least concentration of metals compared to

the rest of the samples. After boiling, concentrations

of heavy metals varied according to the samples. We

observed that Cu was the only metal which concen-

tration was significantly reduced in all boiled decoc-

tions. Other metals such as Cd, Mn, Zn and Fe,

were either reduced or increased in metal concentra-

tions after boiling. Pb concentration was elevated af-

ter boiling; however the values were not significantly

different from non-boiled samples. We also noted

that there were no significant differences in concen-

tration of heavy metals between samples with single

herbal species (CHM3, CHM4) compared to multi-

ple herbal species (CHM1, CHM2).

DISCUSSION

The discovery of microbial contamination in CHMs is

common,

20

as microbes can be easily introduced any-



time during the cultivation and preparation of CHMs.

Thus to prevent microbial contaminants, CHMs

should be handled under strict regulations and pack-

aged using clean packaging materials.

21

In our study,



Bacillus spp. was the most commonly recovered con-

taminant compared to Clostridium and Staphylococcus

spp. This agrees with literatures.

20

Our focus on Bacil-



lus was because this endospore-forming bacterium was

known to produce pre-formed toxins which could

cause foodborne illness.

22,23


Interestingly, no Bacillus

spp. were recovered from the boiled decoctions in this

study, suggesting that boiled decoctions were generally

icines with reportedly 48% of American ginseng root

samples harbouring 10

5

cfu of Aspergillus/g sample



21

and


was detected in seeds of American ginseng as well.

25

As-



pergillus can continue to spread during storage if the

CHMs are not dried properly,

22

thus it is crucial to pro-



cess CHMs carefully.

For heavy metal contamination in CHMs, our resultof-

fered the novelty of documenting heavy metal concen-

Figure 1 Microbial contaminants (log

10

cfu/mL) recovered from CHM sampleson, (A) Nutrient Agar, (B) Potato Dextrose Agar, (C) Hi-



Crome Bacillus Agar, (D) Reinforced Clostridial Agar, and (E) Mannitol Salt Agar

CHM: Chinese herbal medicine; CHM1A:“Eight treasure herbal tea”sample from shop A; CHM1B:“Eight treasure herbal tea”sam-

ple from shop B; CHM2A: "Herbal tea" sample from shop A; CHM2B: "Herbal tea" sample from shop B; CHM3A: Xiyangshen root

sample from shop A; CHM3B: Xiyangshen root sample from shop B; CHM4A: Dangshen root sample from shop A; CHM4B: Dangsh-

en root sample from shop B. The effect of boiling on the microbial contaminants was evaluated within the same sample using

paired-sample t-test (

a

indicates significant difference between before and after boiling within the same sample at P≤0.05). Bars in-



dicate standard error.

A

B

C

D

E

122


Ting ASY et al. / Experimental Study

JTCM


|

www. journaltcm. com

February 15, 2013

|

volume 33



|

Issue 1


|

Figure 2 Concentrations of, (A) Cd, (B) Cu, (C) Zn, (D) Mn, (E) Pb and (F) Fe, detected in each sample before and after boiling.

CHM: Chinese herbal medicine; CHM1A:“Eight treasure herbal tea”sample from shop A; CHM1B:“Eight treasure herbal tea”sam-

ple from shop B; CHM2A: "Herbal tea" sample from shop A; CHM2B: "Herbal tea" sample from shop B; CHM3A: Xiyangshen root

sample from shop A; CHM3B: Xiyangshen root sample from shop B; CHM4A: Dangshen root sample from shop A; CHM4B: Dangsh-

en root sample from shop B. The effect of boiling on the metal concentration was evaluated within the same sample using

paired-sample t-test (

a

indicates significant difference between before and after boiling within the same sample at P≤0.05). Bars in-



dicate standard error.

A

B

C

D

E

F

trations in boiled decoctions, as existing literatures

mainly discussed metal levels in non-boiled CHMs.

26,27


We found that Pb concentrations in boiled and

non-boiled samples were 1.028 and 0.750 mg/L, well

within the permissible level of 10 mg/L.

28

However, we



detected higher concentrations of Cd from boiled de-

123


JTCM

|

www. journaltcm. com

February 15, 2013

|

volume 33



|

Issue 1


|

Ting ASY et al. / Experimental Study

coctions in samples CHM3A and CHM4A, exceeding

slightly the 0.3 mg/L permissible level.

28

The higher



concentrations of Cd in herbal medicine appeared to

be a common finding. High Cd levels were also detect-

ed in 79 samples of various herbal medicines in Italy

(up to 0.75 mg/L),

29

and in ginseng purchased from



the US, Europe and Asia.

30

We postulate that this



could be associated with the fact that most plants natu-

rally had active Cd uptake via roots which then re-

mained in the plant tissues.

31

We do not have permissi-



ble levels of Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe as they are not yet

identified as major health hazards in CHMs. Neverthe-

less, these trace elements are now increasingly found in

the environment as a result of heavy usage of pesticides

(Cu-based pesticides)

7

leading to groundwater contami-



nation,

32

and the overuse of Mn-based fungicides.



33

These heavy metals must be monitored especially since

Mn and Fe have potential to increase in concentrations

in boiled decoctions as determined in this study. These

metals must be monitored to reduce the risk of bioac-

cumulation of metals in our body upon consumption.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors extend their gratitude to Monash Universi-

ty Sunway Campus for the financial assistance and fa-

cilities to conduct the study.



REFERENCES

1

Akerele O

. Nature's medicinal bounty: don't throw it

away. World Health Forum 1993;14(4): 390-395.

2

Koh H

, Woo S. Chinese proprietary medicine in Singa-

pore-Regulatory control of toxic heavy metals and unde-

clared drugs. J Drug Safety 2000; 23(5): 351-362.

3

Ernst E

. Herbal medicines: balancing benefits and risks.

Novartis Found Symp 2007; 282: 154-172.

4

Atherton DJ

, Sheehan MP, Rustin MH, et al. Treatment

of atopic eczema with Traditional Chinese Medicinal

plants. Pediat Dermatol 1992; 9(4):373-375.

5

Liang YZ

, Xie PS, Chan K. Quality control of herbal med-

icines. J Chromatography 2004; 812(1-2): 53-70.

6

Saad B

, Azaizeh H, Hijleh GA, et al. Safety of traditional

Arab herbal medicine. J Safety Med Plants 2006; 3(4):

433-439.


7

Ochei J

, Kolhatkar A. Bacteriology, Medical Laboratory

Science: Theory and Practice. India: Tata McGraw-Hill

2000; 547-548.

8

Stickel F

, Droz S, Patsenker E, et al. Severe hepatotoxicity

following ingestion of Herbalife® nutritional supplements

contaminated with Bacillus subtilis. J Hepatology 2009; 50

(1): 111-117.

9

Lu ZY

, Ye JW, Yuan WP, et al. Determination and analysis

of the alfatoxin in seven Traditional Chinese Medicines.

Chin Arch Tradit Chin Med 2001; 5: 527-528.

10

Zhang HF

, Zhao CJ, Ni N. Determination of heavy met-

al elements in five beneficial traditional Chinese medi-

cines. J Shenyang Pharmac Univ 2003; (1):8-11.

11

Ernst E

. Toxic heavy metals and undeclared drugs in

Asian herbal medicines. Trends Pharmacol Sc 2002; 23(3):

136-139.

12

Chauhan NS

. Medicinal and aromatic plants of Himachal

Pradesh. 1st ed. New Delhi: Indus Publishing,1999: 129.

13

Hou JP

, Jin YY. The healing power of Chinese herbs and

medicinal recipes. New York: Haworth Press, 2005:

330-498.


14

Watson RR

, Preedy VR. Botanical medicine in clinical

practice. United Kingdom: CAB, 2008: 52-63.

15

Hempen CH

, Fisher T. A meteria medica for Chinese

medicine. China: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2009:

15-73.

16

Watson RR



. Complementary and alternative therapies in

the aging population. United States of America: Academic

Press, 2009: 256.

17

Watson RR

, Preedy VR. Botanical medicine in clinical

practice. United Kingdom: CABI, 2008: 112-120.

18

Hu SY

. Food plants of China. Hong Kong: The Chinese

University Press, 2005: 230-248.

19

Watson RR

, Preedy VR. Botanical medicine in clinical

practice. United Kingdom: CABI, 2008: 52-63.

20

Raman P

, Patino LC, Nair NG. Evaluation of metal and

microbial contamination in botanical supplements. J Ag-

ricul Food Chem 2004; 52(26): 7822-7827.

21

Tournas VH

, Katsoudas E, Miracco EJ. Moulds, yeasts

and aerobic plate counts in ginseng supplements. Int J

Food Microbiol 2006; 108(2): 178-181.

22

McGuire M

, Beerman KA. Nutritional sciences: from fun-

damentals to food. 3rd ed. Unites States of America:

Brooks Cole; 2012: 215-217.

23

Wearing J

. Bacteria: Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Clos-

tridium, and other bacteria. Canada: Crabtree Publishing

Company, 2010.

24

Sonenshein AL

, Hoch JA, Losick R. Bacillus subtilis and

its closest relatives: from genes to cells. Washington: ASM

Press, 2001: 128-129.

25

Zhang GZ

, Zhang SF. Fungal detection of American gin-

seng seeds from Beijing and northeast area in China.

Zhong Guo Zhong Yao Za Zhi 2002; (27): 658-661.

26

Ang HH

. Lead contamination in Eugenia dyeriana herbal

preparations from different commercial sources in Malay-

sia. Food Chem Toxicol 2008; 46(6): 1969-1975.

27

Caldas ED

, Machado LL. 2004. Cadmium, mercury and

lead in medicinal herbs in Brazil. Food Chem Toxicol

2004; 42(4): 599-603.

28

Harris ESJ

, Cao SG, Littlefield BA, et al. Heavy metal

and pesticide content in commonly prescribed individual

raw Chinese Herbal Medicines. Sc Total Environ 2011;

409(20): 4297-4305.

29

Pasquale AD

, Paino E, Pasquale RD, et al. Contamina-

tion by heavy metals in drugs from different commercial

sources. Pharmacol Res 1993; 27(1): 9-10.

30

Khan IA

, Allgood J, Walker LA, et al. Determination of

heavy metals and pesticides in ginseng products. J AOAC

Int 2001; 84(3): 936-939.

31

Kumar A

. Environmental Contamination bioreclamation.

1st ed. New Delhi: APH Publisher, 2004: 91-92.

32

Kirschmann JD

. Nutrition Almanac. 6th ed. New York:

McGraw-Hill, 2006: 75-83.

33

Howe P

, Malcolm HM, Dobson S. Manganese and its

compounds: environmental aspects. World Health Organi-



zation; 2004(63): 62-63.

124



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə