D. W. Thomas Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, or 97331-2902, usa



Yüklə 322.78 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/6
tarix07.08.2017
ölçüsü322.78 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6

Abstract

We censused all trees ‡1 cm dbh in 50 ha of forest in Korup National Park,

southwest Cameroon, in the central African coastal forest known for high diversity

and endemism. The plot included 329,519 individuals and 493 species, but 128 of those

taxa remain partially identified. Abundance varied over four orders of magnitude,

from 1 individual per 50 ha (34 species) to Phyllobotryon spathulatum, with 26,741

trees; basal area varied over six orders of magnitude. Abundance patterns, both the

percentage of rare species and the dominance of abundant species were similar to

those from 50-ha plots censused the same way in Asia and Latin America. Rare

species in the Korup plot were much less likely to be identified than common species:

42% of taxa with <10 individuals in the plot were identified to species, compared to

95% of the abundant taxa. Geographic ranges for all identified species were gleaned

from the literature and online flora. Thirteen of the plot species are known only from

Korup National Park (all discovered during the plot census), and 39 are restricted to

the Nigeria–Cameroon coastal zone. Contrary to expectation, species with narrow

geographic ranges were more abundant in the plot than average. The small number of

narrow endemics (11% of the species), many locally abundant, mitigates short-term

extinction risk, either from demographic stochasticity or habitat loss.

D. Kenfack (

&)

Missouri Botanical Garden, 4500 Shaw Blvd., St, Louis, MO 63110, USA



e-mail: david.kenfack@mobot.org

D. W. Thomas

Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-2902, USA

G. Chuyong

Department of Life Sciences, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63, Buea, Cameroon

R. Condit

National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, 735 State St. Suite 300, Santa Barbara,

CA 93101, USA

R. Condit

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Unit 0948, APO AA 34002-0948, USA

123

Biodivers Conserv



DOI 10.1007/s10531-006-9065-2

O R I G I N A L P A P E R

Rarity and abundance in a diverse African forest

David Kenfack Æ Duncan W. Thomas Æ

George Chuyong Æ Richard Condit

Received: 10 April 2006 / Accepted: 15 May 2006

Ó

Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006



Keywords

Korup Æ Cameroon Æ Tree abundance Æ Dominance Æ Rarity Æ

Geographic range

Introduction

Rarity is central to tropical forest conservation. Diverse communities inevitably

include large numbers of species which are seldom recorded: the singletons in many

inventories. In typical forest plots of a single hectare or less, 30% of the tree species

may be singletons (Pitman et al. 1999). To exacerbate the difficulties with our

understanding of tropical communities, species identification is often problematic.

Even experts leave many specimens as ‘morphospecies’—recognizable within a site,

but not matched to named collections in herbaria. For these reasons—rarity and

difficult taxonomy—quantitative information on the abundances and distributions of

tropical organisms, not just trees, remains problematic, and conservation planning is

hindered by lack of basic knowledge about which species are most endangered. This

is probably true in Africa more than any other region.

In addition, African forests can have unusual abundance patterns. One or a few

species sometimes approach abundances observed in temperate forests (e.g. San-

kovski and Pridnia 1995; Shaw et al. 2004), where a single dominant tree comprises

more than half the forest (Makana 1998; Hart unpublished, 1990). This is known as

monodominance, and although it is known in tropical forests elsewhere, it is most

important in Africa (Marimon et al. 2001; Nascimento and Proctor 1997). Mono-

dominance should go hand-in-hand with low diversity (Connell and Lowman 1989)

and rarity, because the dominant trees force the scarce species to even lower

abundance. Enhanced rarity exacerbates the problems of studying the forests. More

exhaustive inventories are needed to document tree species abundances, and rarity

might enhance extinction risk for many species.

The coastal forests of Western Africa, especially Cameroon, are increasingly

recognized as important for the conservation of forest diversity. They are the richest

in plant species across Africa and repeatedly appear as a center of endemism for

plants and for animals (Lovett et al. 2000; Linder 2001; Ku¨per et al. 2004; Rodrigues

et al. 2004; Burgess et al. 2005). Because conservation of species and communities

depends on more than just species counts, we sought more detailed information

about the forests of coastal Cameroon. As part of a global network of large census

plots within the tropics, coordinated by the Center for Tropical Forest Sciences

(CTFS) of the Smithsonian Institution, we initiated a large-scale and precise forest

inventory, aimed at documenting the abundances of all tree species and testing

hypotheses about factors that regulate diversity and species composition. The plot

covers 50 ha in the Korup National Park, and all individual trees have been mapped

and identified (Thomas et al. 2003; Chuyong et al. 2004). Along with a companion

plot in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Makana et al. 2004), these are the

largest forest plot inventories in Africa, and provide quantitative assessments of

abundance and rarity.

Here we describe the floristic composition, structure, and physiognomy of the

Korup plot. We answer several basic questions about tree abundance: is the forest

monodominant, and how abundant are the dominant canopy tree species? Is the

understory also dominated by one or a few species? At the opposite extreme, how

Biodivers Conserv

123


many species are rare in 50 ha? We then consider whether the rare species at Korup

have narrow geographic ranges, as predicted by macroecological theory (Brown

1995; Gaston 2003). Conservation planning often relies on the local abundance of

species as well as their geographic ranges, and here we provide information for

judging the conservation importance of southwest Cameroon (Rodrigues and Gas-

ton 2000). Because a dozen other sites in the world now have comparable inventories

(Condit et al. 2005), abundance patterns at Korup can be compared against the rest

of the world, so that we can determine whether African forests differ fundamentally,

as Richards (1973) once suggested.

Materials and methods

The park and forest

The Korup plot (NW corner 5°03.86¢ N, 8°51.17¢ E) is located in southern Korup

National Park (4°54¢ to 5°28¢ N latitude and 8°42¢ to 9°16¢ E longitude), near the

coast of Cameroon and the Nigerian border. It is within a belt of evergreen forest

extending from southeast Nigeria to the mouth of the Congo River (Fig. 1) that is

called the Lower Guinea forest, containing one or more Pleistocene refugia (White

1979; Maley 1987). The belt is characterized by wet forested lowlands, often backed

by mountain ranges, and is generally reported to be rich in species (Linder 2001).

Letouzey (1968, 1985) described the southern part of the Korup National Park as

Biafran coastal forest, rich in gregarious Fabaceae-Caesalpinioideae.

Fig. 1 Map of tropical Africa showing the three major forest blocks, from west to east: Upper

Guinea, Lower Guinea, Congo (or Congolian). Inset in lower left is the detailed map of southeast

Nigeria and southwest Cameroon, with Korup National Park indicated

Biodivers Conserv

123


The plot measures 1,000·5,00 m

2

and is 150–240 m above sea level. The long axis



of the plot crosses a permanent creek which is fed by a number of small, seasonal

drainages (Fig. 2). One-third of the plot is a steep, rocky ridge, while the remaining

two-thirds are flat terrain (Fig. 2). Soils of southern Korup are mostly non-hydric,

skeletal, with a high sand content and low pH (Gartlan et al. 1986). Detailed soil

mapping within the plot has been initiated but will be reported elsewhere.

Census


We first surveyed the 50 ha, placing permanent stakes precisely every 20 m with

minimal damage to the vegetation (Condit 1998). Subsequently, all individuals

‡1 cm diameter-breast-height (dbh) were tagged with numbered aluminum tags,

mapped, measured, and identified to morphospecies. Stem diameter was measured

1.3 m above the ground, with swollen or buttressed trees measured at a spot where

the trunk was more regular; in these cases, the measurement spot was painted so

future measurements could match. Any stem fork or branch <1.3 m above the

ground was treated as a secondary stem and also measured. To map stems, ropes

were strung between adjacent stakes (including diagonals) and temporary stakes

were placed at 5-m intervals, then the position of each stem was marked by eye on

maps covering 10·10 m

2

. Additional details are given in Condit (1998).



Taxonomy and collection

Most of the trees enumerated lacked flowers and fruits, so we had to rely on veg-

etative characters to segregate morphospecies: color, odor, and texture of bark slash;

color of exudates from bark or leaves; leaf arrangement; petiole length; leaf shape;

the number and form of secondary veins; and indumenta. Vouchers were collected

from each morphospecies in the plot when first encountered. The first specimen was

considered the ‘‘type’’ and was carefully described. Each morphospecies was sub-

sequently collected at least five times (excepting those with <5 individuals) and

compared side-by-side with the ‘‘type’’ until we were confident we could recognize

Fig. 2 Topographic map of the Korup 50-ha plot, 1000 m · 500 m with 2 m contours. North and the

highest point in the plot is to the left

Biodivers Conserv

123


it. Flowers or fruits were eventually collected from most taxa. Matching and rec-

ognizing morphospecies is a matter of judgment, and our opinions changed through

time, but two of us (DK, DT) spent 700 days over 3 years in the plot, viewed nearly

every one of 330,000 individuals, and checked all morphospecies against reference

collections at herbaria in Cameroon, the U.K., and the U.S. (Herbaria YA, SCA, K,

MO) and against regional floras (Aubre´ville et al. 1963–2001, 1961–1991; Hutchin-

son et al. 1954–1972). We are reasonably confident in our current classification of

individuals into 493 morphospecies, but a few will change when fertile material is

studied. A few trees could not be sorted, mostly because they lacked leaves but

appeared to be alive. Our family classification follows the Angiosperm Phylogeny

Group (2003).

Abundance and diversity calculations

Because many inventories in tropical forest cover just 1 ha, we report abundance

and basal area on a per hectare basis as well as for all 50 ha combined. The former is

simply 0.02 times the latter, however, we can go further by estimating standard

deviations by dividing the 1000·500 m

2

into 50 non-overlapping 100 · 100 m



2

and


counting individuals (basal area) in each. Our counts of individuals do not include

multiple stems per tree, but multiple stems are included in the basal area calcula-

tions. Unidentified trees were included in calculations of total plot basal area and

density.


For species richness of trees ‡1 cm dbh, we report the tally for all 50 ha and the

mean per hectare, obtained by averaging the totals from 50 100·100-m

2

. The trees



not identified to morphospecies were not included in diversity estimates. All cal-

culations were repeated for trees ‡10 cm dbh.

Height categories of species

We classified all species into four growth-forms according to their estimated maxi-

mum height. Treelets and small trees include all species with adults generally less

than 10 m tall; understory trees are those with adults 10–20 m tall; lower canopy

species have heights 20–30 m; and upper canopy species are those often >30 m in

height and emergent above the main canopy. Corresponding adult stem diameters

were <10 cm, 10–30 cm, 30–60 cm, and >60 cm dbh, respectively. Information on the

heights of the species came from field estimates in the plot supplemented with

information from the literature, especially Aubre´ville et al. (1963–2001) and

Hutchinson et al. (1954–72).

Geographic range

Distribution patterns of the Korup tree species were tallied relative to the major

African phytochoria (White 1979, 1983), which are based on the three main blocks of

moist tropical forest in Africa (Fig. 1). White’s large eastern block, or Congolian

forest, falls largely in the two countries called Congo. His central block is the Lower

Guinean forest, and covers the coastal belt from eastern Nigeria south through

Gabon. The western block is Upper Guinea, mostly in Ivory Coast and Ghana. These

three blocks are considered Pleistocene forest refugia (White 1983; Maley 1987), and

Upper Guinea in the west is currently isolated from Lower Guinea by the Dahomey

Biodivers Conserv

123


Gap, a low rainfall area where savanna reaches the Atlantic coast; Lower Guinea

and the Congolian forest are presently contiguous.

Tree distributions were obtained from the literature (Aubre´ville et al. 1963–

2001, 1961–1991; Hutchinson et al. 1954–1972), supplemented by the TROPICOS

database (http://www.mobot.mobot.org/W3T/Search/vast.html). Ideally, we would

have considered ranges quantitatively, but species distribution data from tropical

Africa is too sparse to allow this. Instead, we assigned each species to one of

seven categories: (1) pan-African, including all moist forest and extending into dry

and montane forests around it; (2) Guineo–Congolian, including all three moist

forest blocks; (3) Lower Guineo–Congolian, meaning the central and eastern

blocks; (4) Upper and Lower Guinea, or the central and western blocks; (5)

Lower Guinea only; (6) coastal Nigeria–Cameroon only; and (7) Korup National

Park only. The only species in the last category are those we discovered in the 50-

ha plot.


We tested the hypothesis that geographic range was associated with abundance

within the 50-ha plot, and this required estimates of statistical confidence. For all

species in the same category of geographic range, we calculated the median abun-

dance per 50 ha. Confidence limits in those medians were estimated by a spatial form

of bootstrapping, because highly aggregated species distributions do not justify

standard statistics (Valencia et al. 2004). The plot was divided into 50 individual

hectares (non-overlapping 100 · 100 m

2

), and these were resampled with replace-



ment 1,000 times. For each sample, the median abundances were recalculated, and

the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles were used as confidence limits.

Results

Floristics and diversity



A total of 493 morphospecies were recorded within the 50-ha plot, including 365

(71%) identified to species, 96 (20%) identified to genus, 29 (6%) identified to

family, plus three not yet known at even the family level (Table 1). In addition, 680

individual trees have not been assigned a morphospecies. There were 245 genera and

62 families among the 493 species (Appendices 1–3). Among trees ‡10 cm dbh, there

were 306 species, 184 genera, and 53 families (Table 1).

So far, we have discovered 13 new species in the plot, and four of these have been

described (Kenfack et al. 2004, 2006; Sonke´ et al. 2002; Gereau and Kenfack 2000).

We anticipate more novel species among the 128 unnamed morphospecies and the

680 unassigned individuals.

The family Rubiaceae was the richest in the plot, with 86 species in 40 genera;

Fabaceae was next with 39 species in 25 genera. The traditional Euphorbiaceae had

37 species and 25 genera, but APG II (2003) divided this into the Phyllanthaceae (9

genera), the Euphorbiaceae (14 genera), and the Putranjivaceae (2 genera). The

Annonaceae and Malvaceae (including the traditional Sterculiaceae and Tiliaceae)

also had more than 20 species each in the plot, and the Annonaceae had 11 genera

(Appendix 3).

There were 233.1 species per ha among all individuals (Table 1), and 88.5 among

trees ‡10 cm dbh. Fisher’s alpha for the entire plot was 56.9, and 62.8 for trees

‡10 cm dbh, but was lower for individual hectares (Table 1).

Biodivers Conserv

123


Abundance

We recorded 329,319 trees with dbh ‡1 cm within the 50-ha plot, of which 24,591, or

7.5%, were ‡10 cm dbh; this amounts to 6,586 individuals ha

–1

, with 492 ha



–1

above


10 cm dbh. The plot had 32.0 m

2

ha



–1

basal area, and 26.0 m

2

ha

–1



in trees ‡10 cm.

Cola in the Malvaceae was the most abundant genus (Appendix 2), followed by

Rinorea (Violaceae), Phyllobotryon (Salicaceae, formerly Flacourtiaceae), and

Diospyros (Ebenaceae). The Malvaceae was the most abundant family, followed by

Violaceae, Salicaceae, and the Euphorbiaceae (Appendix 3). Oubanguia was the

dominant genus in basal area, almost entirely in one species, Oubanguia alata

(Lecythidaceae, formerly Scytopetalaceae). Lecythidaceae was the dominant family

in basal area, due mostly to Oubanguia alata, followed by Fabaceae, Malvaceae and

Euphorbiaceae (Table 2).

Several treelets were the most abundant species in the plot, with Phyllobotryon

spathulatum first and three other Cola close behind (Table 2). Two canopy species,

Oubanguia alata and Dichostemma glaucescens (Euphorbiaceae) were also among

the top 10 species in abundance. Oubanguia and Dichostemma ranked first and third

in total basal area, and Cola laterita ranked second, with low stem density but many

large trees (Table 2). The largest diameters overall were mostly Lecomtedoxa kla-

ineana (Sapotaceae), reaching 190 cm and including 13 of the 20 biggest trees; the

single biggest tree was a 205-cm Erythrophleum ivorense (Fabaceae).

At the other extreme, 221 of 493 species (45%) had a mean density of £1 tree

ha

–1

, and 34 species were singletons in 50 ha. Considering only trees ‡10 cm dbh,



there were 38 singletons in the 50 ha, and 239 species had density <1 ha

–1

(78% of all



species ‡10 cm).

Basal area had an even greater range: 12 rare species had 2·10

–6

m

2



ha

–1

(a single



1-cm sapling in 50 ha), while Oubanguia had 4.3 m

2

ha



–1

. The distribution of basal

area and abundance per species approached log-normal, though deviating slightly

with an excess of rarity (Fig. 3). These highly skewed abundance distributions pro-

duce extremes in the way that a few species dominate: the 10 most abundant species

(2% of the total) accounted for 42% of the individuals, while the 10 rarest species

accounted for <0.1%. In basal area, the 10 dominants accounted for 41% of the

forest, while the 10 rarest accounted for 0.0001%.

Species rare in the plot were considerably less likely to be fully identified than

abundant species. Of the 100 rarest species (£7 individuals), 47 were identified to

species, in contrast to 89 fully identified out of the 100 most common species (>500

Table 1 Structure and

diversity of the Korup 50-ha

plot. N refers to the total

number of, and BA the basal

area. SD = standard deviation

‡1 cm

‡10 cm


‡30 cm

Mean N ha

–1

6586.4


491.8

83.9


SD N ha

–1

987.6



49.7

14.9


Mean BA ha

–1

32.0



26.0

16.1


SD BA ha

–1

4.1



4.0

4.1


Mean species ha

–1

238



86.3

35.5


SD species ha

–1

17.5



12.0

8.2


Species (50 ha)

–1

493



306

192


Mean Fisher’s ha

–1

48.3



30.5

24.2


SD Fisher’s ha

–1

3.8



5.6

8.9


Fisher’s (50 ha)

–1

56.9



49.3

41.5


Biodivers Conserv

123


Table

2

Domin



ant

species


in

Koru


p

50-ha


plot,

in

fou



r

diamete


r

cat


egories

(‡

10,



100,


and

300



m

m

dbh)



,

and


in

tot


al

bas


al

area


Speci

es

N



10

(ran



k)

N



100

(ran


k)

N



300

(rank)


BA

(ran


k)

Phyllo


botryon

spathul


atum

(TL)


(Low

er

Guinea)



534.6

(1)


0.1

(215)


0.0

(315


)

0.24


57

(32)


Cola

se

mecarp



ophylla

(TL)


(SE

Niger


ia

and


SW

Camero


on)

490.4


(2)

0.4


(121.5)

0.0


(315

)

0.66



60

(7)


Dichos

temma


gla

ucescens


(C)

(Lower


G

uinea–Co


ngol

ian)


345.0

(3)


45.5

(2)


1.9

(7)


1.57

61

(3)



Cola

pra


eacuta

(TL)


(SE

Nigeria


and

SW

Camero






Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə