Contents Mayor’s message 3 Why grow local plants? 4



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Local Native Plants Guide

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Contents

Mayor’s message ____________________________ 3

Why grow local plants?_______________________ 4

Where to begin __________________________________ 5

Plant selection and planting out  ___________________ 6

Planting your local plants _________________________ 6



List of specialist nurseries ____________________ 7

Watering ___________________________________ 8

 

When to water ________________________________ 8 



 

What irrigation to use __________________________ 8



Pruning ____________________________________ 9

 

When to prune ________________________________ 9 



 

How to prune _________________________________ 9 

 

Tips for pruning _______________________________ 9



Mulch ____________________________________ 10

 Why 


mulch? 

_________________________________ 10 

 

What makes a good mulch? ___________________ 10 



 

When to mulch?  _____________________________ 10 

 

How much mulch? ___________________________ 10 



 

What to avoid?  ______________________________ 10 



Fertilisers _________________________________ 11

 

When to apply fertiliser _______________________ 11 



 

Best to use __________________________________ 11



Local plant list __________________________ 12-15

Cottage garden ____________________________ 16

 

Cottage garden plant list ______________________ 17



Water features _____________________________ 18

 

Water feature plant list ________________________ 19



Mediterranean gardens ______________________ 20

 

Mediterranean plant list _______________________ 21



Japanese style garden ______________________ 22

 

Japanese plant list ___________________________ 23



2

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It’s important to understand why it’s better to plant 

local plants before you embark on planting your dream 

garden. 

The planting of exotic plants in your garden can lead 

to a variety of problems. Firstly, they require more water 

which is increasingly a concern in Australia. Secondly 

they require more fertiliser which enters groundwater and 

street drainage, contributing to toxic algal blooms in the 

Swan River and wetlands.

They can also become environmental weeds as they 

can spread into native bushland and compete with our 

native  species. Native plants unlike non-natives occur in 

local bushlands around Bayswater and so rarely become 

a problem.

Native gardens use less water, need less fertilisers and 

don’t invade other areas of bushland. Not only will you 

have a colourful garden all year round but you’ll lessen 

your water bill and feel good about doing something for 

the environment.

Many of our native plants also provide food and habitat for 

native birds, insects, butterflies and frogs while providing 

vegetation islands for these animals to rest. 

So not only do local, native plants stop environmental 

degradation but they also increase biodiversity in your 

suburb!

Why grow local plants?

4

4

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Where to begin

Here are some handy tips to think about when designing 

your garden:

  try drawing the colours you want on graph paper to 

give you a good idea of the colours and types of plants 

you want, where you want to plant them and how the 

result may look;

 rid yourself of weeds before you plant and mulch. 

Try not to plant larger plants near fences and walls, 

because they can be damaged as the plants grow 

larger;

  most plants now come in different forms, so remember 



to ask about dwarf and groundcover varieties of your 

favourite plants to better fit your garden;

 for all year round colour, select plants that flower in 

different seasons. Ask your nursery for plants with 

different coloured foliage, such as Agonis flexuosa 

‘Burgundy’ which has deep red leaves, to bring more 

colour to your garden; and

  don’t be afraid to be creative, mix up species, colours 

and sizes in differing numbers for a natural yet 

effective look.



5

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6

Plant selection and planting out

These tips will help you in selecting the types of plants you would like in your garden:

go for smaller plants in larger pots as they won’t be root bound and more likely to survive 

when you put them in the ground. If you’re looking for a more instant effect buy more  

mature plants;

read the label on the plants as they tell you how much water and sunlight it will need as well as how 

big it  will grow;  

 take advantage of the winter rains and plant in April through August. Plants will get plenty of water 

and have time to establish before the spring growing season and survive the summer; and

  

Planting your local plants

Consider the following when planting your native plants:

set out your plants in their pots where you want them to be, keep shuffling them until you have the 

look you desire.

give the plant, the hole and the soil around it, a good water before planting. Try adding a wetting 

agent to improve water retention, and a little bit of low phosphorus fertiliser;

dig a hole that is a bit larger than the pot. Take the plant from its pot and gently loosen the roots 

before placing it in the middle of the hole and carefully fill in with soil;

 gently but firmly pat the soil around the plant concentrating on the area around the stem. 

 

The plant should be slightly lower than the surrounding soil, forming a small depression around  



its stem so the water is directed towards the roots. 

finish off with a 5 cm deep and 20 cm wide layer of mulch around the plant base (try not to have the 

mulch too close to the stem because it can encourage rotting). 

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7

List of specialist nurseries that sell local plants 

Here are a number of nurseries where you will be able to buy the plants you need. The City of Bayswater  

doesn’t necessarily endorse these nurseries, and alternatives are available in the phone book.   

Nursery   

Street

Suburb   

Phone

Fax   

APACE Nursery    

1 Johanna Street  

North Fremantle  9336 1262     9430 5729   

Australian Native Nursery Group     141 King Road 

Oakford   

9525 1324     9525 4703   

Boola Wongin Nursery    

619 Armadale Road    

Forestdale    

9397 0160     9397 1430   



Carramar Coastal  Nursery     

Lot 5 Mandurah Road     Secret Harbor     9524 1227     9524 1777   



Environment House

61 Eighth Avenue    

Maylands    

9271 4488    9271 9005



Lullfitz Nursery     

Caporn Street    

Wanneroo    

9405 1607    9306 2933   



Men  Of The Trees      

Corner Amherst Road/     Hazelmere    

9250 1888     9250 2735    

 

Stirling Crescent  



Muchea Tree Farm     

Lot 214 Archibald Street  Muchea   

9571 4090     9571 4297   

Native Flora Technologies   

30 Malvern Street    

West Swan    

9250 3491     9250 3491   

 

 

 



9377 0444       

Zanthorrea Nursery    

155 Watsonia Road    

Maida vale    

9454 6260     9454 4540   

Also check out www.bayswater.wa.gov.au for more native nurseries

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What irrigation to use

It’s important to choose the correct irrigation methods to 

get the maximum benefit from your garden.

Methods where the water is directed straight towards the 

roots are best, like adjustable dripper or trickle systems 

and subsurface irrigation. For plants with a high water 

demand, simply use a high flow rate dripper. 

Another option is to use grey water from the everyday 

running of your household. Grey water is waste water from 

your household such as the shower and laundry. 

Wherever this system is used it’s important the grey water 

is disposed of below the ground and a licence is obtained 

from your local Council’s Health Section so is doesn’t 

cause a health hazard. For more information contact 

the City of Bayswater Environmental Health Section on 

 

9272 0648.



Watering

When to water

Choosing local plants reduces water wastage.

It’s a great idea to use local plants because they are 

suited to Perth’s climate and require little summer 

watering. While they are establishing however they will 

require some watering. This is also true during extended 

dry periods at any time of year.

Water a couple of times a week in the first week of planting. 

Keep this up during the summer months for the first year 

to give your plants a kick start. More established plants 

won’t need much water, but if they start to look stressed 

or if a heat wave hits, a ‘one off’ on your designated 

watering day will be enough to see them through.

The best time to water would be in the morning, but be sure 

not to over water as this could lead to rotting, diseases 

and shallow root growth, as well as the encouragement 

of weeds. If water repellence occurs, you may need to 

apply a wetting agent.



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Pruning

When to prune

Your best time to prune is in late spring or early summer. 

Pruning in winter or mid summer should be avoided because this 

can lead to extensive die back in your plants. Young plants should 

be pruned lightly and regularly while older plants can handle more 

extensive pruning and love a good trim.



How to prune

After the plant has finished flowering, cut the stems just behind the 

seed pod to prune new season growth. For old wood just prune the 

centre of the plant and leave the younger growth on the outsides. 



Tips for pruning:

  cut off the whole branch cleanly at the joint leaving a flat edge;

  remove low branches to make weeding easier; and

 the softer wooded plants aren’t as tough as the hardier woody 

plants, so they should only be pruned lightly. 

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9

Hot Tip!

Tough love

To help prevent black ink disease, be brutal and cut back 

Kangaroo Paws after flowering each year. They’ll thank you for it 

in the long run!

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10

Mulch

Why mulch?

Adding suitable mulch to your garden after planting not 

only helps the soil to retain moisture and keep your plants 

cooler, but it also reduces the number of weeds in your 

garden and therefore the amount of weeding you have 

to do. The best mulches are a mixture of different plant 

materials of different sizes.

What makes a good mulch?

The best mulch is the one that if you walk on it without 

shoes, it hurts your feet. Coarse material is best, like the 

natural leaf litter from your garden.



When to mulch?

All mulches break down over time so you will need to 

replace it every spring or early summer.  

How much mulch? 

To aid water retention, create a circular depression around 

the plant in a 10 cm thick layer of suitable mulch.

What to avoid?

Applying mulch too close to the plant stem can encourage 

disease and rotting. Not a desirable outcome!

Mulches made from exotic species and soft leaved plants 

can degrade too quickly and release nutrients into the soil 

too fast for WA plants.

Some commercial mulches are higher in nitrogen and 

phosphorus and not suitable for local WA plants. They 

are usually already composted and are more a soil 

conditioner rather than a mulch. Look for native plant or 

low phosphorus fertilisers.

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11

Fertilisers

Native plants evolved to the low nutrient levels in most 

of Bayswater’s soils. This is why exotic plants need 

heaps more fertilisers than natives.

Native plants can’t handle traditional fertilisers because 

they don’t like high nutrient levels, in particular, 

phosphorus. 

To keep your garden looking stunning, add a little 

native fertiliser and follow the instructions on the bag. 

Remember excess nutrients are a waste and only cause 

algal blooms in our waterways. 

When to apply fertiliser

The best option is to apply the fertilisers to the bottom 

of the hole when planting. Only apply fertiliser during 

the growing season and over the root zone when the 

plant shows signs of nutrient deficiencies. 

Hot Tip! 

Not all bugs are bad

For a more organic solution try seaweed fertiliser or 

fish emulsion to encourage more healthy microbial 

activity in your soil. It will also help your plants to 

grow and fight off diseases.

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12

Trees & Small Trees

Allocasuarina fraseriana

 

Sheoak/Kondil 



15 

Brown  


May - Oct

Banksia attenuata

 

Candle Banksia/Piara 



5 to 8 

Yellow 


Sep - Oct

Banksia grandis

 

Bull Banksia/Pulgaria 



10 

Yellow 


Sep - Dec

Banksia ilicifolia

 

Holly-leaf Banksia  



10 

Red & cream 

Mar - Jan

Banksia littoralis

 

Swamp Banksia 



10 

Pale yellow 

March - Aug

Banksia menziesii

 

Firewood Banksia 



10 

Red & silver 

Feb - Aug

Banksia prionotes

 

Acorn Banksia 



10 

Bright orange 

March - May

Eucalyptus ficifolia

 

Red Flowering Gum 



Red 


Dec - May 

Eucalyptus lane-poolei

 

Salmon White Gum 



12 to 15 

Creamy-white 

Jan - Sep

Eucalyptus rudis

 

Flooded Gum 



 to 20 

Creamy-white 

Aug

Eucalyptus todtiana

 

Coastal Blackbutt/Prickly Bark 



9 to 16 

Creamy-white 

Feb

Nuytsia floribunda

 

Christmas Tree 



to 10 

Bright orange 

Oct - Jan

Paraserianthes lophantha

 

Albizia 



10 

Greenish-yellow 

Aug - Feb

Xylomelum occidentale

 

Woody Pear 



to 8 

White 


Dec - Feb

Shrubs (3 to 5m)

Acacia rostellifera

 

Summer-scented Wattle 



2 to 5 

Yellow 


Aug - Oct

Acacia saligna

 

Kudjong 



Yellow 


Aug - Oct

Actinostrobis pyramidalis

 

Swamp Cypress 



Brown 


Aug - Nov

Adenanthos cygnorum

 

Common Woollybush 



2 to 4 

Red 


Sep - Feb

Conospermum triplinervium

  Tree Smokebush 

Grey 


Aug - Nov

Hakea bucculenta

 

Red Pokers 



Red 


Aug - Sept

Hakea prostrata

 

Harsh Hakea 



White 


Aug - Nov

Hakea victoria

 

Royal Hakea 



White 


Jun - Jul

Oxylobium lineare

 

River Pea 



Red, Yellow 

Sep - Jan

Shrubs (1 to 3m)

Acacia dentifera

 

 



Golden  


Aug - Nov

Acacia pulchella

 

Prickly Moses 



Yellow 


Jun - Oct

Adenanthos obovatus

 

Basket Flower 



Scarlet, Orange 

Aug - Nov

Local Plant List

(Coastal & Eastern)

Botanical Name

Common/Nyoongar Name

Height (m)

Flower Colour

Flower Time

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13

Beaufortia squarrosa

 

Sandplains Brush Myrtle/Puno 



Red 


Jan - Apr

Calothamnus quadrifidus

 

One sided Bottle Brush/Kwowdjard  1 to 2 



Red 

Aug - Dec



Calothamnus sanguineus

 

Silky-leaved Blood Flower/Pin-dak 



Blood Red 

Mar - Oct

Conospermum incurvum

 

Plume Smokebush 



0.4 to 1 

White-grey 

Jul - Nov

Dampiera teres

 

Terete-leaved Dampiera 



0.2 to 0.6 

Blue 


Aug - Nov

Darwinia citriodora

 

Lemon Scented Myrtle 



Yellow, Red 

Jul - Dec

Dryandra armata

 

Prickly Dryandra 



Yellow 


Jun - Nov

Eremaea pauciflora

 

Orange-flowered Eremaea 



1.5 to 2 

Orange 


Sep - Dec

Eremaea purpurea

 

Purple-flowered Eremaea 



Pink-purple 

Oct - Feb

Grevillia obtusifolia

 

 



0.5 to 2 

Red 


Sep - Oct

Hakea lissocarpha

 

Honey Bush 



White-yellow, Pink 

Jun - Sep

Hakea ruscifolia

 

Candle Hakea 



White 


Dec - Mar

Lambertia multiflora

 

Many-flowered Honeysuckle 



Yellow 


Jun - Dec

Macrozamia riedlei

 

Zamia Palm/Djiridji 



Red 


Sep - Oct

Melaleuca acerosa

 

Coast Honey Myrtle 



Cream 


Sep - Dec

Melaleuca conothamnoides

   


0.3 to 1.5 

Pink-purple 

Apr - Jan/Sep - Nov

Melaleuca radula

 

Graceful Honey Myrtle 



Pink, Mauve 

Sep - Nov

Persoonia saccata

 

Thread-leaf Snottygobble 



0.2 to 1.5 

Yellow 


Jul - Jan

Xanthorhoea preissii

 

Grasstree/Palga 



White 


Nov - Jan

Shrubs (Less than 1m)

Acacia lasiocarpa

 

Dune Moses/Panjang 



0.5 to 1 

Yellow 


Jun - Aug

Acacia preissiana

 

 



0.05 to 0.35 

Yellow 


Dec - Jan

Acacia stenoptera

 

Narrow-winged Wattle 



0.3 to 1 

Creamy-yellow 

May - Sep

Acacia willdenowiana

 

Grass Wattle 



0.3 to 0.6 

White, Yellow 

Jun - Oct

Actinostrobus acuminatus

 

Dwarf Cypress 



0.3 to 0.75 

Brown  


Oct - Dec

Andersonia lehmanniana

 

 



0.15 to 0.6 

White, Pink-purple 

May - Sep

Baeckea camphorosmae

 

Camphor Myrtle 



White, Pink 

May - Feb

Beaufortia elegans

 

 



Purple, Pink 

Nov - Feb

Beaufortia purpurea

 

 



Purple 


Oct - Jan

Boronia crenulata

 

Aniseed Boronia 



Pale Red 

Aug - Oct

Botanical Name

Common/Nyoongar Name

Height (m)

Flower Colour

Flower Time

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Local Plant List

(Coastal & Eastern) cont.

Bossiaea eriocarpa

 

Common Brown Pea 



0.2 to 1 

Brown & Yellow 

Jul - Oct

Calytrix flavescens

 

Summer Starflower 



0.3 to 0.8 

Yellow 


Nov - Jan

Calytrix fraseri

 

Pink Summer Calytrix 



0.6 to 1 

Pink, Purple 

All Year

Chorizema dicksonii

 

Yellow-eyed Flame-pea 



Orange-red & Yellow  Aug - Oct



Chorizema ilicifolium

 

Holly flame pea 



0.75 

Red & Yellow 

Jul - Aug 

Dampiera linearis

 

Common Dampiera 



0.15 to 0.6 

Indigo 


Jul - Nov

Darwinia citriodora

 

Lemon Scented Myrtle 



Yellow, Red 

Jul - Dec

Dryandra lindleyana

 

Couch Honeypot/Pudjaun 



Low 

Gold  


May - Sep

Eremophila glabra

 

Tarbush 



0.5 to 1 

Orange 


Mar - Dec

Gompholobium tomentosum

  Hairy Yellow Pea 

0.3 to 1 

Yellow 


Aug - Dec

Grevillea bipinnatifida

 

Fuchsia Grevillea 



0.3 to 1 

Dull Red-Orange, Red  Mar - Nov



Grevillea pressii

 

Sea Spray 



to 1m 

Red 


Jun - Sep

Grevillea thelmanniana

 

Spider-net Grevillea 



0.4 to 1 

Red 


May - Sep

Grevillea wilsonsii

 

Wilson’s Grevillea 



0.5 to 1 

Bright Red 

May - Nov

Hakea myrtoides

 

Myrtle Hakea 



Dark Pink 

Jul - Aug

Hibbertia hypericoides

 

Buttercups 



0.75 

Brilliant yellow 

May - Oct 

Hibbertia racemosa

 

Stalked Guinea-flower 



0.1 to 0.75 

Yellow 


Jul - Nov

Hovea pungens

 

Devil’s Pins/Puyenak 



Purple 


Jun - Nov

Hovea trisperma

 

Common Hovea 



0.1 to 0.7 

Purple 


Jun - Sep

Hypocalymma angustifolium

  Coconut Ice 

0.75 

White or pink-tinged 



Jul - Oct

Hypocalymma robustum

 

Swan River Myrtle 



Pale Deep-pink 

Jul - Oct

Isopogon dubius

 

Rose Conebrush 



Pink 


Jul - Oct

Isotropis cuneifolia

 

Granny’s Bonnets 



0.05 to 0.3 

Yellow & Red 

Aug - Oct

Jacksonia sericea

 

Waldjumi 



0.6 

Orange  


Dec - Feb

Labichea punctata

 

Lance-leaved Cassia 



Yellow 


Jul - Oct

Melaleuca scabra

 

Rough Honey-myrtle 



Pink-purple 

Sep - Dec

Melaleuca trichophylla

 

 



0.15 to 1 

Pink-purple 

Nov - Jan

Petrophile linearis

 

Pixie-mops 



0.2 to 1 

Pink, mauve 

Sep - Nov

Petrophile macrostachya

 

 



Yellow 


Aug - Nov

Pimelea rosea

 

Rose Banjine 



Pale Deep-pink 

Aug - Nov

14

Botanical Name

Common/Nyoongar Name

Height (m)

Flower Colour

Flower Time

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15

Pimelea sulphurea

 

Yellow Banjine 



0.15 to 0.7 

Yellow 


Oct - Nov

Scaevola calliptera

 

 



0.1 to 0.4 

Blue 


Sep - Jan

Sphaerolobium medium

 

 



0.1 to 0.6 

Yellow-Orange-Red 

Aug - Nov

Verticordia densiflora

 

Bushy Featherflower 



Pink, White 

Nov - Jan

Verticordia huegalii

 

Variegated Featherflower 



0.6 

Cream, Yellow 

Aug - Oct

Verticordia plumosa

 

Plumed Featherflower 



Pink 


Sep - Dec

Perennial Herbs

Anigozanthos humilis

 

Catspaw 



0.1 to 1 

Orange 


Aug - Oct

Anigozanthos manglesii

 

Kangaroo Paw/Kurulbrang 



Red & Green 

Sep - Nov

Anigozanthos viridis

 

Green Kangaroo Paw 



Green 


Sep - Nov

Austrostipa flavescens

 

Tall Speargrass 



0.2 to 1.2 

Silver 


Sep - Oct

Austrostipa semibarbata

 

Bearded Speargrass 



0.3 to 0.1 

White hairy 

Aug - Nov

Chamaescilla corymbosa

 

Blue Squill 



0.05 to 0.4 

Pink 


Aug - Oct

Conostylis aculeata

 

Grey Cottonheads 



0.4 

Yellow 


Aug - Sep

Conostylis candicans

 

Spiny Cottonheads 



0.4 

Yellow 


Sep - Nov

Conostylis setigera

 

Bristly Cottonheads 



0.4 

Yellow 


Sep - Oct

Dianella revoluta

 

Blueberry Lilly/Native flax 



Purple 


Sep - Jan

Neurachne alopecuriodes

 

Foxtail Mulga-grass 



Grey 


Aug - Nov

Orthrosathus laxus

 

Morning Iris 



0.15 to 0.55 

Blue 


Aug - Nov

Patersonia occidentalis

 

Purple Flag/Kom-ma 



0.5 to 0.8 

Purple 


Sep - Oct

Climbers & Groundcovers

Hardenbergia comptoniana

 

Native Wisteria 



Climber 

Purple 


Jun - Sep

Hemiandra pungens

 Snakebush 

Climber 

Mauve 


All 

Year


Kennedia coccinea

 

Coral Vine 



Climber 

Red-yellow 

Jul - Nov

Kennedia nigricans

 

Black Coral Pea 



Climber 

Black & Yellow 

Jul - Nov 

Kennedia prostrata

 

Running Postman 



Low 

Red 


Aug - Nov

Pronaya fraseri

 

Pronaya 



Climber 

Pale Mauve 

Dec - Feb

Sollya heterophylla

 

Australian Bluebell 



Low & climber  Sky Blue 

Oct - Feb



Botanical Name

Common/Nyoongar Name

Height (m)

Flower Colour

Flower Time

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Cottage garden

Everyone loves that ‘cottage garden’ look.

A cottage garden is a mixture of fast growing native annuals and 

herbaceous perennials, with winding pathways and  peaceful 

alcoves. 

Follow  these few simple guidelines to ensure successful cottage 

garden planting:

  your garden beds should not be formally structured, mix it 

up a little and plant randomly. Remember if it isn’t the look 

you desire,  you can always move them around;

 self seeding plants will mean your garden will develop 

without continual planting;

  scented plants will give a lingering fragrance over the garden 

and add to the effect;

  create focal points by placing different colour foliaged plants 

around benched, arches and statues;

  cottage gardens are all about the blooms, so replace some 

lawn with garden beds;

  cover unattractive sights such as old sheds and boring walls 

with climber covered lattice and if you’re feeling adventurous 

run a climber up your arches; and

 arches, arbors, lattice, picket fences, rustic ornaments, 

garden furniture, pots, statues and ornaments will all look at 

home in your cottage garden.



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Tree

Common name

Eucalyptus ficifolia 

Red flowering gum



Eucalyptus victrix

Shrub

Acacia lasiocarpus Dune 

Moses


Eremea purpurea/elegans

Eremophila calorhabdos Red 

rod


Pimelea ferruginea

Small shrub

Dryandra nivea Honeypot 

Dryandra


Leschenaultia biloba Blue 

Leschenaultia



Cottage garden plant list

Try the below plants to achieve that ‘cottage’ look.



17

Patersonia occidentalis

Leschenaultia biloba

Anigozanthos manglesii

Little strappy plants

Common name

Anigozanthos manglesii Kangaroo 

paws


Conostylis candicans Spiny 

Cottonheads



Orthrosanthus  

laxus/multiflorus Morning 

Iris


Climber

Hardenbergia  

comptoniana Native 

Wisteria


Groundcover

Adenanthos cuneatus  

(low groundcover form) 

Coastal Jugflower

Eremophila glabra Kalbarri 

carpet


Hemiandra pungens Snakebush

Melaleuca pentagona Little 

Penta


Pimelea ferruginea

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Water features

Water features always lift the look of a garden and can 

really create a great ‘feel’.

A water feature can be as large or as small as you want or 

as space allows. Your water feature can be anything from 

water slowly spilling over the edges of an ornamental pot 

to a cascading fountain. 

Most people don’t realise that many species adapted 

to Perth soils are also great for water gardens. Ask your 

nursery about native sedges. 

Not only is a water feature a great element in your design

but it also attracts birds and frogs into your garden.



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Water feature plant list

Here are some native species that are great for water gardens.



Tree

Common name

Melaleuca priessiana Moonah

Melaleuca rhaphiophylla Swamp 

Paperbark



Shrubs

Acacia pulchella Prickly 

Acacia


Conostylis sitergia Bristly 

Cottonhead



Dampiera linearis Common 

Dampiera


Dianella revoluta 

Blue Berry Lilly



Sedges and rushes

Baumea juncea 

Bare Twig Rush



Ficinia nodosa 

Knotted Club Rush



Juncus kraussii Shore 

Rush 


Juncus pallidus Pale 

Rush


 

19

Dianella revoluta

Juncus kraussii

Acacia pulchella

Ficinia nodosa

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Mediterranean gardens

The Mediterranean garden is a great garden for 

entertaining in Perth’s hot summers. 

This design is a mixture of courtyards surrounded by 

planter beds filled with bright flowers. You can use some 

statues, bright ornamental pots or garden arches to add a 

bit of flair to your design.

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Tree

Common name

Eucalyptus torquata Coral 

Gum


Eucalyptus victrix

Shrub

Acacia lasiocarpa Dune 

Moses


Anigozanthos manglesii Kangaroo 

Paw


Conostylis candicans Spiny 

Cottonheads



Eremophila calorhabdos Red 

Rod


Hypocalymma robustum  Swan River Myrtle 

Macrozamia reidlei Zamia 

Palm


Xanthorrhea sp Grass 

Tree


Mediterranean garden plant list

Below is a list of plants you may want to have a look at if you 

like the idea of a Mediterranean garden. 

21

Groundcover / Climber

Eremophila glabra 

Tarbush


Hardenbergia  

comptoniana Native 

Wisteria


Kennedia prostrata Running 

Postman


Perennial herb

Dianella revoluta Blueberry 

Lily


Kennedia prostrata

Hypocalymma 

robustum

Eremophila glabra

Conostylis candicans

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Japanese style garden

Why not add some spirituality to your garden?

The Japanese style garden draws influences from Shinto, 

Buddhist and Taoist philosophies to bring a sense of 

spirituality  to the garden. 

Rocks are positioned first because they change the 

least and represent stability in the garden. Rocks should 

be of similar colour, texture and form. Pebbles are also 

a regular feature and are used to represent the flow of 

water and continuity of life. They can also be used to form 

pathways.

Small bamboo water features like a deer scarer are 

common in a Japanese garden and bring the sound of 

tranquillity to the space, as well as mark the passing of 

time. 

Gazebos are a good way to enjoy and observe the garden 



in all seasons, while statues of lions are placed at the 

entrance to a garden to guard against intruders.

The common rule of the Japanese garden is ‘less is more!”

azebos are a good way to enjoy and observe the garden 

all seasons, while statues of lions are placed at the 

ntrance to a garden to guard against intruders.

he common rule of the Japanese garden is ‘less is more!”

22

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Tree

Common name

Agonis flexuosa Peppermint 

‘Burgundy’



Pittosporum  

phylliraeoides Weeping 

Pittosporum



Shrub

Banksia blechnifolia

Hakea bucculenta 

Red Poker



Xanthorrhoea sp Grass 

Tree


Groundcover / Climber

Grevillea obtusifolia 

Gin Gin Gem



Hemiandra Pungens 

Snakebush   



Perennial Herb

Dianella revoluta Blueberry 

Lily


Ficinia nodosa

Japanese garden plant list 

Below is a list of plants that may inspire your creativity  

when choosing plants.

23

Grevillea obtusifolia

Xanthorrhoea preissii

Hakea bucculenta

Hemiandra pungens

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City of Bayswater 

61 Broun Avenue 

Morley WA 6062 

Tel: (08) 9272 0622 

Fax: (08) 9272 0665 

Email: mail@bayswater.wa.gov.au 

Website: www.bayswater.wa.gov.au

Where to from here?

The City of Bayswater hopes you have enjoyed the booklet and have found 

the information useful. With all this talk about the world’s environmental 

problems, it can all seem hard to know where you can help. This book 

represents the ways in which you can begin to soften your eco footprint by 

increasing biodiversity in your garden and stopping algal blooms, all while 

having a beautiful garden with Australian values. 

For more information on the booklet visit the  City’s website 

 

www.baywater.wa.gov.au  under  the Environment section for updates 



on garden designs, nurseries  recommended books, plant photos and 

plant facts.



This book has been produced with 100% recycled paper.

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