Bioscience Discovery, 3(3): 296-311, No



Yüklə 1.72 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix07.08.2017
ölçüsü1.72 Mb.
  1   2   3

 http://www. biosciencediscovery.com 

296                                            ISSN: 2231-024X (Online) 

Bioscience Discovery, 3(3): 296-311, Nov. 2012   

      

                   

     ISSN: 2229-3469 (Print) 

 

HPTLC FINGER PRINT ANALYSIS OF PHYTOCOMPOUNDS AND IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF 

EUGENIA FLOCCOSA BEDD. 

 

Tresina, P.S.

 1

, Mary Jelastin Kala, S



 2

 and Mohan, V.R.

1

 

 



1

Ethnopharmacology Unit, Research Department of Botany, V.O.Chidambaram College, Tuticorin-628008, 

Tamil Nadu, India. 

2

 Department of Chemistry, St. Xavier’s College, Palayamkottai, Tamil Nadu, India. 



vrmohan_2005@yahoo.com 

 

 

ABSTRACT 

This  paper  has  reported  the  preliminary  phytochemical  screening,  HPTLC  analysis  of 

phytocompounds  and  in  vitro  antioxidant  activities  of  ethanol  extract  of  Eugenia  floccosa  leaves. 

This  is  the  first  report  on  the  antioxidant  activity  of  this  plant.  The  preliminary  phytochemical 

analysis  showed  the  presence  of  alkaloids,  coumarin,  catechin,  steroids,  flavonoids,  saponins, 

phenols,  glycosides  and  terpenoids.  HPTLC  analysis  also  confirmed  the  presence  of  alkaloids, 

steroids, flavonoids, saponins, phenols, glycosides and terpenoids. The antioxidant activities of the 

leaves in ethanol extract are assessed using different models like DPPH, superoxide radical, hydroxyl 

radical and ABTS

+

 cation radical and reducing power at different concentrations. The ethanol extract 



at 800µg/ml showed maximum scavenging activity. Results obtained revealed that, ethanol extract 

of leaves of E. floccosa possess highly antioxidant activity. Thus his study suggests that,  E. floccosa 

plant can be used as a potent source of natural antioxidant. 

Key words: E. floccosa, HPTLC analysis, antioxidant activity, DPPH, reducing power. 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

A  free  radical  is  a  molecule  with  one  or 

more unpaired electrons in the outer orbital. Many 

of  these  free  radicals  are  in  the  form  of  reactive 

oxygen  and  nitrogen  species,  these  can  occur  due 

to oxidative stress brought about by the imbalance 

of the bodily antioxidant defense system and free-

radical  formation  (Wong  et  al.,  2000).  Oxidative 

stress  has  been  linked  to  cancer,  aging,  ischemic 

injury,  inflammation  and  neurodegenerative 

diseases.  Reactive  oxygen  species  (ROS)  such  as 

superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical 

and nitric oxide  radical attack  biological molecules 

such  as  lipids,  proteins,  enzymes,  DNA  and  RNA, 

leading  to  cell  or  tissue  injury  associated  with 

aging,  antherosclerosis,  carcinogenesis  and  may 

lead  to  the  development  of  chronic  diseases 

related  to  the  cardio  and  cerebrovascular  systems 

(Chen et al., 2005; Halliwell and Gutteridge, 1986). 

The  most  commonly  used  synthetic  antioxidants 

presently  used  as  butylatedhydroxyanisole  (BHA), 

butylatedhydroxy toluene (BHT), propylgallate (PG) 

and  tert  butylatedhydroquinone.  However,  these 

synthetic  antioxidants  have  side  effects  such  as 

liver  damage  and  carcinogenesis  (Wichi,  1988). 

Free-radical scavengers are antioxidants which can 

provide  protection  to  living  organisms  from 

damage  caused  by  uncontrolled  production  of 

reactive  oxygen  species  and  subsequent  lipid 

peroxidation,  protein  damage  and  DNA  strand 

breaking (Ghosal et al., 1996). 

 

In  the  past  few  years  natural  antioxidants 



have generated considerable interest in preventive 

medicine.  The  food  industry  also  uses  natural 

antioxidants  as  a  replacement  of  conventional 

synthetic  antioxidants  in  food  by  natural  products 

that  are  considered  to  be  promising  and  a  safe 

source  (Zupko  et  al.,  2001).  As  a  result  of  which, 

much  attention  has  been  directed  towards  the 

characterization  of  antioxidant  properties  of  plant 

extracts  /their  functions  and  identification  of  the 

constituents  responsible  for  those  activities 

(Valentao  et  al.,  2001;  Haraguchi  et  al.,  1996; 

Soares et al., 1997). 

 

The  present  study  aims  to  assess  the 



antioxidant  capacity  of  ethanol  extract  of  E. 

floccosa  leaf.  Plant  extracts  were  tested  for 

phytochemical  screening,  HPTLC  analysis  and 

different free radical scavenging activities including 

the  1,  1-diphenyl  picryl  hydrazyl  (DPPH), 

superoxide  radical,  ABTS

+

  cation  radical,  hydroxyl 



radical  and  their  reducing  power  capacity.

 http://www. biosciencediscovery.com 

297                                            ISSN: 2231-024X (Online) 

Tresina et al., 



 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

PLANT  MATERIAL  AND  PREPARATION  OF  PLANT 

EXTRACT 

 

The  leaves  of  E.  floccosa  were  collected 

from  upper  Kothiyar,  Agasthiarmalai  Biosphere 

Reserve,  Western  Ghats,  Tamil  Nadu.  The  leaf 

samples  were  air  dried  and  powdered.  Required 

quantity of powder was weighed and transferred to 

stoppered flask  and treated with the ethanol until 

the powder is fully immersed. The flask was shaken 

every  hour  for  the  first  6  hours  and  then  it  was 

kept  aside  and  again  shaken  after  24  hours.  This 

process  was  repeated  for  3  days  and  then  the 

extract was filtered. The extract was collected and 

evaporated  to  dryness  by  using  a  vacuum 

distillation  unit.  The  final  residue  thus  obtained 

was  then  subjected  to  HPTLC  analysis  and 

assessment  of  antioxidant  activity.  The  extracts 

were subjected to qualitative test the identification 

of  various  phytochemical  constituents  as  per 

standard  procedures  (Brindha  et  al.,  1981;  Lala, 

1993). 


HPTLC ANALYSIS FOR PHYTOCOMPOUNDS 

 

Test  solution  2µl  and  4  µl  of  standard 



solution  was  loaded  as  6mm  band  length  in  the 

4x10  silica  gel  60F

254

  HPTLC  plate  using  Hamilton 



syringe  and  Camag  Linomat  5  instrument.  Mobile 

phase  was  chloroform-methanol  (9.9:0.1)  for 

alkaloid,  ethyl  acetate-  butanone-  formic  acid- 

water  (5:3:1:1)  for  flavonoid,  ethyl  acetate-

methanol-ethanol-water 

(8:1:1:1:0.4:0.8) 

for 

glycosides,  chloroform-methanol-water  (9:1:0:1) 



for  saponin,  ethyl  acetate-methanol-acetic  acid-

water  (10:2.2:1.1:2.6)  for  steroid  and  n-hexane-

ethyl  acetate  (1:1)  for  terpenoid  were  used.  The 

plate  was  kept  in  photo-documentation  chamber 

(CAMAG REPROSTAR 3) and captured the images at 

white  light,  UV  254nm  and  UV366nm.  Finally,  the 

plate was fixed in a scanner stage and scanning was 

done  at  254nm  for  alkaloid,  flavonoid,  366nm  for 

glycosides,  terpenoids  500nm  for  saponin  and 

steroid.  The  peak  table,  peak  display  and  peak 

densitogram were noted. 

ANALYSES OF ANTIOXIDANTS 

DPPH RADICAL SCAVENGING ACTIVITY 

 

The  DPPH  is  a  stable  free  radical 

and is widely used to assess the radical scavenging 

activity  of  antioxidant  component.  This  method  is 

based  on  the  reduction  of  DPPH  in  methanol 

solution  in  the  presence  of  a  hydrogen  donating 

antioxidant due to the formation of the nonradical 

form DPPH-H Blois, 1958. 

 

The  free  radical  scavenging  activity  of  all 



the  extracts  was  evaluated  by  1,  1-diphenyl-2-

picryl-hydrazyl  (DPPH)  according  to  the  previously 

reported  method  Blois  (1958)  Briefly,  an  0.1mm 

solution  of  DPPH  in  methanol  was  prepared,  and 

1ml  of  this  solution  was  added  to  3  ml  of  the 

solution  of  all  extracts  in  methanol  at  different 

concentration  (50,  100,  200,  400,  800  μg/ml).The 

mixtures  were  shaken  vigorously  and  allowed  to 

stand  at  room  temperature  for  30  minutes.  Then 

the absorbances were measured at 517 nm using a 

UV-VIS 

spectrophotometer 



(Genesys 

10UV: 


Thermo  electron  corporation).Ascorbic  acid  was 

used as the reference. Lower absorbance values of 

reaction  mixture  indicate  higher  free  radical 

scavenging  activity.  The  capability  to  scavenging 

the  DPPH  radical  was  calculated  by  using  the 

following formula. 

DPPH 

scavenging 



effect 

(% 


inhibition)= 

100


1

Ao

A

Ao

 

Where, A



0

 is the absorbance of the control 

reaction,  and  A

1

  is  the  absorbance  in  presence  of 



all  of  the  extract  samples  and  reference.  All  the 

tests were performed in triplicates and the results 

were averaged. 

 

SUPEROXIDE RADICAL SCAVENGING ACTIVITY 

Superoxide  anion  scavenging  activity  was 

measured  according  to  the  method  of  Robak  and 

Gryglewski (1988) with some modifications. All the 

solutions  were  prepared  in  100mM  phosphate 

buffer  (pH  7.4)1ml  of  reduced  Nicotinamide 

adenine dinucleotide (NADH, 468 µm) 3ml of plant 

extract  of  different  concentration  (50,  100,  200, 

400,  800  μg/ml)  were  mixed.  The  reaction  was 

initiated  by  adding  100ml  of  phenanzine 

methosulphate  (PMS,60µm).the  reaction  mixture 

was  incubated  at  25

o

C  for  5  min,  followed  by 



measurement  of  absorbance  at  560nm.the 

percentage  inhibition  was  calculated  by  using  the  

following equation 

 

Superoxide radical scavenging activity =  

100

1

Ao



A

Ao

 

 



 http://www. biosciencediscovery.com 

298                                            ISSN: 2231-024X (Online) 

Bioscience Discovery, 3(3): 296-311, Nov. 2012   

      

                   

     ISSN: 2229-3469 (Print) 

 

Where, A



0

 is the absorbance of the control 

reaction,  and  A

1

  is  the  absorbance  in  presence  of 



all of the extract samples and reference. All the test 

were performed in triplicates and the results were 

averaged 

ANTIOXIDANT  ACTIVITY  BY  RADICAL  CATION 

(ABTS. +) 

 

ABTS  assay  was  based  on  the  slightly 



modified  method  of  Re  et  al.  (1999).  ABTS  radical 

cation  (ABTS.+)  was  produced  by  reacting  7mM 

ABTS 

solution 



with 

2.45 


mM 

potassium 

persulphate  and  allowing  the  mixture  to  stand  in 

the  dark  at  room  temperature  for  12-16  h  before 

use . The ABTS.+ solution was diluted with ethanol 

to  an  absorbance  of  0.70+0.02  at  734  nm.  After 

addition  of  100μL  of  sample  or  trolox  standard  to 

3.9 mL of diluted ABTS.+ solution ,absorbance was 

measured  at  734  nm  by  Genesis  10s  UV-VIS 

(Thermo scientific) exactly after 6 minutes. Results 

were  expressed  as  trolox  equivalent  antioxidant 

capacity (TEAC).   

ABTS radical cation activity =  

100


1

Ao

A

Ao

 

Where,  A



0

  is  the  absorbance  of  the  control 

reaction,  and  A

1

  is  the  absorbance  in  presence  of 



all  of  the  extract  samples  and  reference.  All  the 

tests were performed in triplicates and the results 

were averaged. 

HYDROXYL RADICAL SCAVENGING ACTIVITY 

The  scavenging  capacity  for  hydroxyl 

radical  was  measured  according  to  the  modified 

method of Halliwell et al. (1987). Stock solutions of 

EDTA (1mM), FeCl3 (10mM), Ascorbic Acid (1mM), 

H

2



O

2

  (10mM)  and  Deoxyribose  (10  mM),  were 



prepared in distilled deionized water. 

 

The  assay  was  performed  by  adding  0.1ml 



EDTA  ,  0.01ml  of  FeCl

3

,0.1ml  H

2

O

2



,  0.36ml  of 

deoxyribose,  1.0ml  of  the  extract  of  different 

concentration  (50,  100,  200,  400,  800  μg/ml) 

dissolved  in  distilled  water,0.33ml  of  phosphate 

buffer  (50mM  ,  pH  7.9),  0.1ml  of  ascorbic  acid  in 

sequence . The mixture was then incubated at 37

0



for  1  hour.      1  A  1.0ml  portion  of  the  incubated 



mixture was mixed with 1.0ml of 10%TCA 1.0ml of 

0.5%  TBA  (in  0.025M  NaOH  containing  0.025% 

BHA) to develop the pink chromogen measured at 

532nm. The  hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of 

the  extract  is  reported  as  %  inhibition  of 

deoxyribose degradation is calculated by using the 

following equation 

Hydroxyl 

radical 

scavenging 

activity 

=  


100

1

Ao



A

Ao

 

Where, A



0

 is the absorbance of the control 

reaction,  and  A

1

  is  the  absorbance  in  presence  of 



all  of  the  extract  samples  and  reference.  All  the 

tests were performed in triplicates and the results 

were averaged. 

REDUCING POWER  

 

The  reducing  power  of  the  extract  was 



determined  by  the  method  of  Singh  et  al,  (2009). 

1.0ml of solution containing 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 

μg/ml of extract was mixed with sodium phosphate 

buffer  (5.0  ml,  0.2  M,  pH6.6)  and  potassium 

ferricyanide  (5.0ml,  1.0%):  The  mixture  was 

incubated at 50

o

C for 20 minutes. Then 5ml of 10% 



trichloroacetic  acid  was  added  and  centrifuged  at 

980gm  (10  minutes  at  5

o

C)  in  a  refrigerator 



centrifuge. The upper layer of the solution (5.0 ml) 

was diluted with 5.0ml of distilled water and ferric 

chloride  and  absorbance  read  at  700nm.  The 

experiment was performed thrice and results were 

averaged. 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

PHYTOCHEMICAL AND HPTLC ANALYSIS 

 

The  phytochemical  analysis  of  ethanol 



extract  of  E.  floccosa  leaf showed the  presence  of 

alkaloid,  catechin,  coumarin,  tannin,  saponin, 

steroid,  flavonoid,  phenol,  sugar,  glycoside, 

xanthoprotein  and  fixed  oil.  The  HPTLC  results 

were  tabulated  in  peak  tables  (Tables  1-6).  Peak 

display and peak densitogram were noted (Figures 

1-18). The HPTLC analysis showed the presence of 

alkaloids, 

steroids, 

terpenoids, 

glycosides, 

flavonoids and saponins in the ethanol extract of E. 



floccosa leaf.  

 

PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES 

Presence  or  absence  of  certain  important 

compounds  in  an  extract  is  determined  by  colour 

reactions of the compounds with specific chemicals 

which  act  as  dyes.  This  procedure  is  a  simple 

preliminary  pre-requisite before going for detailed 

phytochemical  investigation.  Various  tests  have 

been  conducted  qualitatively  to  find  out  the 

presence  or  absence  of  bioactive  compounds. 

Phytochemical evaluation is one of the tools for the 

quality  assessment,  which  includes  preliminary 

phytochemcial screening; 

 


 http://www. biosciencediscovery.com 

299                                            ISSN: 2231-024X (Online) 

Tresina et al., 

 

chemo  profiling  and  marker  compound  analysis 



using modern analytical techniques. In the last two 

decades, HPTLC has emerged as an important tool 

for 

the 


qualitative, 

semi-quantitative 

and 

quantitative phytochemical analysis of herbal drugs 



and  formulations.  An  HPTLC  method  is  fast, 

precise,  sensitive  and  reproducible  with  good 

recoveries for standardization of herbal drugs. 

In  the  present  study,  the  preliminary 

phytochemical study on Eugenia floccosa leaf have 

revealed  the  presence  of  alkaloid,  coumarin, 

catechin,  flavonoid,  phenol,  saponin,  steroid, 

glycoside,  terpenoid,  sugar  and  xanthoprotein. 

HPTLC  investigations  also  confirmed  the  presence 

of  alkaloids,  glycosides,  flavonoids,  steroids, 

terpenoids  and  saponins,  which  could  made  the 

plant  useful  for  treating  different  ailments  as 

having  a  potential  of  providing  useful  drugs  of 

human  use.  This  is  because;  the  pharmacological 

activity of any plant is usually traced to a particular 

compound. 

           Therapeutically 

terpenoids 

exert 

wide 


spectrum of activities such as antiseptic, stimulant, 

diuretic,  anthelmintic,  analgesic  and  counter-

irritant.  Many  tannin  containing  drugs  are  used  in 

medicine  as  astringent.  They  are  used  in  the 

treatment of burns as they precipitate the proteins 

of  exposed  tissues  to  form  a  protective  covering. 

They  are  also  medically  used  as  healing  agents  in 

inflammation,  leucorrhoea,  gonorrhoea,  burns, 

piles  and  antidote.  Tannins  have  been  found  to 

have  antiviral,  antibacterial,  antiparasitic  effects, 

antiinflammatory, 

antiulcer 

and 

antioxidant 



property  for  possible  therapeutic  applications.  It 

was  also  reported  that,  certain  tannins  were  able 

to  inhibit  HIV  replication  selectively  and  was  also 

used  as  diuretic  (Akiyama  et  al.,  2001;  Lv  et  al., 

2004; Kolodziej and Kiderlen, 2005).           

Saponins,  a  group  of  natural  products 

occur in the leaf extract of E. floccosa. In plants, the 

presence  of  steroidal  saponins  like,  cardiac 

glycosides  appear to be  confined to many families 

and  these  saponins  have  great  pharmaceutical 

importance  because  of  their  relationship  to 

compounds such as the sex  hormones,  cortisones, 

diuretic  steroids,  vitamin  D  etc.,  (Evans  and 

Saunders, 2001). From plant sapogenins a synthetic 

steroid  is  prepared  and  to  treat  a  wide  variety  of 

diseases  such  as  rheumatoid  arthritis,  collagen 

disorders, allergic and asthmatic conditions (Claus, 

1956).  Saponin  reduces  the  uptake  of  certain 

nutrients  including  glucose  and  cholesterol  at  the 

gut 


through 

intra-luminal 

physicochemical 

interactions.  Hence,  it  has  been  reported  to  have 

hypocholesterolemic  effect  and  thus  may  aid 

lessening  metabolic  burden  that  would  have  been 

placed in the liver (Price et al., 1987). 

Several  authors  reported  that  flavonoids, 

sterols/terpenoids, phenolic acids are known to be 

bioactive  antidiabetic  principles  (Oliver-Bever, 

1986;  Rhemann  and  Zaman,  1989).  Flavonoids  are 

known to regenerate the damaged beta cells in the 

alloxan  induced  diabetic  rats  (Chakravarthy  et  al., 

1980).  Flavonoids  act  as  insulin  secretagogues 

(Geetha et al., 1994). Most of the plants have been 

found  to  contain  substances  like  glycosides, 

alkaloids,  terpenoids,  flavonoids  etc,  which  are 

frequently implicated as having antidiabetic effects 

(Loew and Kaszhin, 2002).  

 

ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY 

 

Oxidative stress has been implicated in the 

pathology  of  many  diseases  and  conditions 

including 

diabetes, 

cardiovascular 

disease, 

inflammatory conditions, cancer and ageing (Marx, 

1987).  Antioxidants  may  offer  resistance  against 

the  oxidative  stress  by  scavenging  free  radicals, 

inhibiting  lipid  peroxidation  and  by  many  other 

mechanisms  and  thus  prevent  disease  (Evans  and 

Miller, 1997).  

DPPH is a relatively stable free radical. The 

assay  is  based  on  the  measurement  of  the 

scavenging  ability  of  antioxidants  towards  the 

stable  radical  DPPH.  From  the  present  results  it 

may  be  postulated  that,  E.  floccosa  leaf  extract 

reduces the radical to the corresponding hydrazine 

when  it  reacts  with  the  hydrogen  donors  in  the 

antioxidant  principles  (Sreejayan  and  Rao,  1996). 

DPPH  radicals  react  with  suitable  reducing  agents, 

the  electrons  become  paired  off  and  the  solution 

loses  colour  stochiometrically  depending  on  the 

number  of  electrons  taken  up  (Evans  and  Miller, 

1997).  The  results  of  the DPPH  scavenging  activity 

of  E.  floccosa  leaf  extract  are  shown  in  Figure  19. 

The  scavenging  ability  of  ethanol  extracts  was 

comparable to ascorbic acid.  

Superoxide  anion  is  an  oxygen-centered 

radical  with  selective  reactivity.  This  species  is 

produced by a number of enzyme systems in auto-

oxidation  reactions  and  by  nonenzymatic  electron 

transfers that univalently reduce molecular oxygen. 



 http://www. biosciencediscovery.com 


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə