Article phytotaxa issn 1179-3155 (print edition) issn 1179-3163



Yüklə 1.4 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü1.4 Mb.

Phytotaxa 191 (1): 154–164

www.mapress.com/phytotaxa/ 

Copyright © 2014 Magnolia Press

Article

PHYTOTAXA

ISSN 1179-3155 (print edition)

ISSN 1179-3163 (online edition)

154    Accepted by Marcos Sobral: 29 Oct. 2014; published: 30 Dec. 2014

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/phytotaxa.191.1.10



Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Rediscovery of Eugenia fajardensis (Myrtaceae), a rare tree from the Puerto Rican 

Bank

JORGE  C.  TREJO-TORRES

1,*

,  MARCOS  A.  CARABALLO-ORTIZ



2,6,*

,  MIGUEL  A.  VIVES-HEYLIGER

3



CHRISTIAN  W.  TORRES-SANTANA



4,7

,  WILLIAM  CETZAL-IX

5

,  JOEL A.  MERCADO-DÍAZ



2

  &  TOMÁS A. 

CARLO

6



The Institute for Regional Conservation. 100 East Linton Boulevard, Suite 302B, Delray Beach, Florida 33483 USA.  

E-mail: karsensis@yahoo.com.mx



Herbario UPR, Jardín Botánico de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, 1187 Calle Flamboyán, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 00926. Current 

Address: 

6

.



Carr. 485 km 3.1, Barrio San José, Quebradillas, Puerto Rico, 00678.

4

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry, Jardín Botánico Sur, 1201 Calle Ceiba, Río 

Piedras, Puerto Rico, 00926.



Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, A. C., Herbario CICY,  A. P. 87, Cordemex, Mérida 97310, Yucatán, México.



Pennsylvania State University, Department of Biology, 208 Mueller Laboratory, University

 

Park, Pennsylvania, 16802, USA.

7

 Arboretum Parque Doña Inés, Fundación Luis Muñoz Marín, RR 2, Buzón #5, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00926.

*These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

Eugenia fragrans var.? fajardensis was described in 1895 and raised to species status in 1923 as E. fajardensis. In 1925, 

it was relegated to the synonymy of Anamomis fragrans (Myrcianthes fragrans). Since 2001, we have re-discovered wild 

plants and herbarium specimens, including a previously unidentified isotype of E. fajardensis, supporting the validity of this 

species. Here we designate a lectotype and an epitype for E. fajardensis. In addition, we provide: 1) an extended description 

for the species including the previously unknown flowers and fruits, an illustration, and photographs of live plants, 2) a key 

for the 24 taxa of Eugenia reported for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and 3) descriptions of the three known popula-

tions. These populations collectively hold 182 plants in the islands of Puerto Rico, Culebra, and Vieques. Based on the IUCN 

Red List Criteria, E. fajardensis meets the requirements to be considered a Critically Endangered species.



Resumen

Eugenia fragrans var.? fajardensis fue descrita en 1895 y elevada al estatus de especie en 1923 como E. fajardensis. En 

1925, esta especie fue relegada como un sinónimo de Anamomis fragrans (Myrcianthes fragrans). Desde el 2001, hemos 

redescubierto poblaciones silvestres y especímenes de herbario, incluyendo un isotipo previamente desconocido de E. faja-

rdensis, los cuales apoyan la validez de la especie. En este artículo designamos un lectotipo y un epitipo para E. fajardensis. 

Además, proveemos: 1) una descripción extendida de la especie incluyendo flores y frutos, anteriormente desconocidos, una 

ilustración, y fotografías de plantas vivas, 2) una clave para distinguir los 24 taxones del género Eugenia reportadas para 

Puerto Rico e Islas Vírgenes, y 3) descripciones de las tres poblaciones conocidas. Estas poblaciones en conjunto contienen 

182 plantas en las islas de Puerto Rico, Culebra y Vieques. De acuerdo con los Criterios de la Lista Roja del UICN, E. faja-

rdensis cumple con los requisitos para ser considerada una especie en Peligro Crítico de Extinción.

Key words: Antilles, Caribbean, Culebra, Fajardo’s big guava, “guayabota de Fajardo”, Puerto Rico, Vieques, West Indies.

Introduction

In 1885 Paul Ernst Emil Sintenis collected a new species of Eugenia Linnaeus (1753: 470) during his three-year 

expedition documenting the flora of Puerto Rico. The specimen was then sent to Berlin and described by Leopold 

Krug and Ignatz Urban as Eugenia fragrans (Swartz 1788: 79) Willdenow (1799: 964) var.? fajardensis Krug & Urban 



EUgEnIA FAJARDEnSIS (MYRTACEAE)

Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press   

•   

155

(1895: 665), honoring Fajardo, the municipality where it was first collected. The question mark in the original name 

indicates that the classification as a variety was tentative, a matter that Urban changed in 1923 by raising it to species 

rank as Eugenia fajardensis (Krug & Urban 1895: 665) Urban (1923: 109).

 

However, E. fajardensis was not accepted as a distinct species by Britton & Wilson (1925; 1926), who considered 



it a synonym of Anamomis fragrans (Swartz 1788: 79) Grisebach (1860: 240). Later authors considered it a synonym 

of Myrcianthes fragrans (Swartz 1788: 79) McVaugh (1963: 485) (Liogier 1994; Liogier & Martorell 1982; Acevedo-

Rodríguez & Strong 2007; 2012). Nevertheless, Roy Woodbury still recognized E. fajardensis as a distinct taxon, 

noting that it was a rare and poorly known species (Woodbury 1975; 1981).

 

The uncertainty regarding the status of E. fajardensis was reinforced by the use of the unpublished combination 



Myrcianthes fajardensis (Krug & Urban) Alain, as a synonym of M. fragrans, in important floristic studies for the 

region (Little et al. 1974; 1988). Woodbury (1981) also used the name M. fajardensis? in his unpublished report on 

the flora of Culebra. The confusion between E. fajardensis and M. fragrans was promoted further by the fact that 

Woodbury used the same collection code (Woodbury V-19) for specimens of both E. fajardensis and M. fragrans 

collected from the same site. 

 

We consider E. fajardensis to be a distinct species based on our examination of an undetermined isotype, additional 



herbarium material, and extant populations. We designate the isotype as lectotype for the name because the holotype 

was lost during WWII (Robert Vogt, curator of Herbarium B, pers. comm., 2014). This lectotype is sterile, therefore 

we designate an epitype to provide the missing fruiting characters that unambiguously distinguish E. fajardensis from 

M. fragrans. We provide 1) an expanded description of the species, an illustration, and photographs of live plants and 

habitats, 2) information on the distribution, habitat, phenology, and common names for E. fajardensis, 3) a discussion 

of the characters that distinguish it from similar species of Myrtaceae, 4) a key for the 24 taxa of Eugenia reported for 

Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, 5) counts of individuals in the three sites where we have documented the species 

and 6) a discussion on some aspects on the conservation of the species.

Rediscovery of Eugenia fajardensis in the wild

In 2001 MAVH discovered an unknown Myrtaceae (latter found to be E. fajardensis) on the upper slopes of Monte 

Pirata Mountain in western Vieques (an island-municipality of Puerto Rico) (Fig. 1). From 2005 to present, additional 

surveys throughout Vieques have resulted on the discovery of 20 individuals of E. fajardensis at all life stages, all 

restricted to Monte Pirata (Fig. 1). In Culebra (another island-municipality of Puerto Rico), field explorations throughout 

the island since 2005 have located 28 plants of E. fajardensis in the mid slopes of a small peninsula between Flamenco 

and Resaca beaches in the northern part of the island (Fig. 1). Explorations in the municipality of Fajardo have resulted 

in the discovery of 136 plants in the western part of Bahía Las Cabezas (Seven Seas Public Beach) and on a small 

hill at El Convento Norte (Fig. 1). In summary, E. fajardensis is currently known from 182 individuals (71 of them 

reproductive or potentially reproductive) representing all life stages, in three sites in the islands of Culebra, Puerto 

Rico, and Vieques (Table 1).

TABLE 1. Demographic and descriptive data of the populations of Eugenia fajardensis: Column 1.- Estimated number of 

individuals categorized by life stage (R = reproductive or potentially reproductive; SA = saplings; SE = seedlings); Column 

2.- Estimated percentage of plants protected (i.e., habitat legally protected, 

1

Culebra National Wildlife Refuge, 



2

Seven Seas 

Natural Reserve, 

3

Northeast Ecological Corridor Natural Reserve, and 



4

Vieques National Wildlife Refuge); Column 3.- Habitat 

description (the exact locality where the plant was collected within Culebrita is unknown); Column 4.- Elevation range (m.a.s.l. 

= meters above sea level); and Column 5.- Annual Average Rainfall (AAR), obtained from Daly et al. (2003).



Extant Populations

Number of individuals

(R / SA / SE)

Plant in protected 

lands (%)

Habitat

Elev. 

(m.a.s.l.)

AAR

(mm)

Culebra island

26 (19/6/1)

85

1



Coastal dry forest along 

rocky dry ravines

15–100

<1000

Culebrita islet

Unknown

100


1

Coastal dry forest

ca. 1–75

<1000

Fajardo (El Convento 

Norte & Seven Seas 

Public Beach)

136 (42/21/74)

100


2, 3

Moist forest on gentle 

slopes; coastal thickets on 

rocky cliffs

3–35

1500–1750



Vieques island

20 (10/10/0)

100

4

Moist forest on steep slopes 240–275



1000–1250

Total

182 (71/37/75)

98%

1275

<10001750

TREJO-TORRES ET AL.

156   

• 

  Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press

FIGURE 1. Distribution of Eugenia fajardensis. A. Map of the Bank of Puerto Rico and St. Croix. B. Close-up of the eastern municipalities 

of Puerto Rico, including Culebra and Vieques. The historical collection by Sintenis in 1885 (Sintenis 1859, C) was made at an unspecified 

locality along the coast of the municipality of Fajardo.

Eugenia fajardensis in herbaria

Four specimens of E. fajardensis were found by JCTT while revising specimens of rare Puerto Rican plants at several 

herbaria in the Caribbean, Europe and North America (visited herbaria are listed in the Acknowledgements section; 

acronyms follow Thiers (2014)). The oldest specimen of E. fajardensis was collected in 1885 by Sintenis on the coast 

of Fajardo. It was identified only at the generic level (Eugenia sp.) and deposited in the herbarium at the University 

of Copenhagen (C). The second specimen of E. fajardensis was collected in 1965 by Richard Howard in the Las 

Croabas area in Fajardo. This specimen was also determined as Eugenia sp. and deposited in the herbarium at Harvard 

University (HUH). Roy Woodbury collected the third and fourth specimens in 1966 at Vieques (Monte Pirata), and 

in  1967  at  Culebrita  (an  offshore  islet  of  Culebra),  respectively.  Both  specimens  were  found  at  the  herbarium  of 

the  Botanical  Garden  of  the  University  of  Puerto  Rico  (UPR). The  specimen  from Vieques  was  misidentified  as 



Calyptranthes thomasiana O. Berg (1855–1856: 26), whereas the specimen from Culebrita was misidentified as M. 

fragrans. Collection numbers for these four specimens are provided within the Taxonomy section.

Eugenia fajardensis in the literature

The  botanical  literature  and  research  reports  in  Puerto  Rico  played  an  important  role  for  the  rediscovery  of  E. 



fajardensis. Key evidence to determine the identity of the taxon emerged from the species protologue, as we noticed 

EUgEnIA FAJARDEnSIS (MYRTACEAE)

Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press   

•   

157

that the unidentified specimen found at C was an unstated isotype of E. fajardensis. We suspect that this duplicate 

specimen remained unidentified because it was sent to Copenhagen before Krug and Urban classified the species 

in  Berlin.  Important  insights  for  the  existence  of  the  species  also  came  from  two  governmental  reports  made  by 

Woodbury, who in 1975 reported E. fajardensis for Fajardo and in 1981 (as M. fajardensis?) for Culebra (Woodbury 

1975; 1981). However, we know of no herbarium specimens determined as E. fajardensis by Woodbury. Additional 

information on the existence of E. fajardensis was found on a publication on endangered plants from the Caribbean 

islands, in which Howard (1977: 111) mentioned the existence of “a probably new species of the Myrtaceae found in 

fruit” at El Conquistador Hotel in Fajardo, which we suspect corresponds to Howard’s abovementioned specimen of 

E. fajardensis collected in 1965 and deposited at HUH.

 

Other  publications  that  mention  E.  fajardensis  include  several  reports,  listings,  recovery,  and  conservations 



plans of endangered species, where it has been mistakenly identified as other species of Myrtaceae, such as Eugenia 

woodburyana Alain (Liogier 1980: 185) (USFWS 2007) and C. thomasiana (Woodbury 1975; Ayensu & DeFilipps 

1978; Little & Woodbury 1980; Center for Plant Conservation 1992; USFWS 1994; Silander 1997; Clubbe et al. 2003; 

DNER 2004; 2008; USFWS 2007; Center for Plant Conservation 2010). However, recent reports clarified that C. 

thomasiana is not present on Puerto Rico or its adjacent islands (Acevedo-Rodríguez & Strong 2012; Breckon in prep.; 

USFWS 2013).

 

Based on our information, E. fajardensis was listed as a “Critical Element” by the Department of Natural and 



Environmental Resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (DNER 2008). However, this status does not imply 

any legal protection for the species. Subsequently, E. fajardensis has also been mentioned as an accepted species 

in  a  thesis  (Castro-Canabal  &  López-Morales  2010),  on  governmental  documents  about  the  Northeast  Ecological 

Corridor Natural Reserve (DNER 2010), and in two recent floristic treatments for the region (Axelrod 2011; Breckon 

in prep.).

Taxonomy

Eugenia fajardensis (Krug & Urban) Urban, Symb. Ant. 9: 109. 1923. Figures 2 & 3.

Basionym: Eugenia fragrans (Swartz) Willdenow  var.? fajardensis Krug & Urban, Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 19: 665. 1895.



Type:

PUERTO RICO. Prope Fajardo, in fruticetis litoralibus, 22 May 1885, Sintenis 1859 (holotype at B destroyed; isotype at C! here 



designated as lectotype).

Epitype (designated here):

PUERTO RICO. Fajardo, Las Croabas, slopes below El Conquistador Hotel, 18 January 1965, Howard 



16063 (HUH!).

Tree or shrub up to 13 meters with one to several trunks, up to 13 cm in diameter; bark on trunks and mature branches 

vertically fissured and gray; twigs compressed, ferrugineous, glabrescent. Leaves coriaceous and fragrant when crushed; 

petioles up to 3.5 × 1.5 mm; blade obovate or obovate-elliptic, 4–6 × 2.5–4.2 cm, cuneate at base, edges entire, revolute 

and usually white or hyaline when fresh, apex obtuse or retuse; venation brochidodromus with secondary veins finely 

raised on both surfaces; adaxial blade bright and smooth with central vein slightly sunken basally; abaxial blade pale 

and punctate, turning mammillate when dry, glands black, with central vein raised. Inflorescences in short racemes of 

up to 7 mm long, with one or two decussate pairs of flowers. Flowers with pedicels up to 5 × 1 mm, papillate, hirsute, 

pale  green;  buds  globose-depressed,  papillate;  bracteoles  ovate-deltoid,  1  mm  long,  papillate,  ciliate;  hypanthium 

broadly conical, papillate, lanose outside, brown; staminal ring square-orbicular, flat, and slightly concave around 

the style; sepals 4, 4–5 mm in diameter, orbiculate, pubescent abaxially and more dense towards the edges, papillate, 

white; petals 4, 4–5 mm in diameter, orbiculate, pubescent abaxially, papillate, white; stamens numerous, filiform, 

white; style linear, ca. 6 mm long, stigma neither narrowed nor swollen at apex, white. Fruits baccate, 2–3.5 cm in 

diameter, globose, bright red when ripe; peduncles up to 5 × 2 mm; endocarp lignified, 1–2 mm thick; seeds solitary, 

1.7–3.2 cm in diameter; germination hypogeous.



 

Distribution:—Restricted to northeastern Puerto Rico and its adjacent islands of Culebra and Vieques, all of them 

under the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Fig. 1).



 

Habitat:—From sea level to approximately 275 m elev. (Table 1). The soil substrates on all populations are 

derived from volcanic rocks, and the climate is subtropical seasonally dry or moist (sensu Holdridge Life Zones; Gould 



et al. 2008), with a regional annual average rainfall ranging from <1000–1750 mm (Daly et al. 2003). The species has 

been found in several environments (Table 1).



TREJO-TORRES ET AL.

158   

• 

  Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press

FIGURE 2. Eugenia fajardensisA. Multiple trunks branching. B. Bark with vertical fissures. C. Young twig with flower buds. D. Twig with 

leaves showing adaxial (right) and abaxial (left) sides. Note gland punctuation in abaxial side. E. Inflorescence (upper view) showing the 

decussately-arranged flower buds. F. Flower in late anthesis, with some stamens and style remaining. G. Flower hypanthia (upper view) with 

all flower whorls fallen, except dry retrorse sepals. H. Twig with fruit. I. Transverse dissection of fruit. (AE, G. Based on photos from the 

authors. F. Artist reconstruction based on senescent flowers from Trejo et al. 3030 (UPR). HI. Based on Howard 16063 (HUH)).


EUgEnIA FAJARDEnSIS (MYRTACEAE)

Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press   

•   

159

FIGURE 3. Eugenia fajardensis. A. Opening flower bud. B. Fully developed fruit (ripening red, not shown). C. Branch with leaves and 

inflorescences with flower buds. D. Bark and leaves underneath. E. Seedling. F. Scrubland habitat in Culebra island. G. Forested habitat in 

Vieques island. H. Forested habitat in Puerto Rico island (El Convento Norte). Images: A–B, E–H by CWTS; C by MACO; D by JCTT.


TREJO-TORRES ET AL.

160   

• 

  Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press

 

Conservation:—According  to  the  IUCN  Red  List  Criteria, E.  fajardensis meets  the  requirements  of  the 

category Critically Endangered under the criteria C2(a)(i), which implies the highest risk of extinction (IUCN 2001). 

A  comprehensive conservation  assessment  is  in  progress  and  will  be  presented  elsewhere  (Torres-Santana 

et  al., 

unpublished data, 2014).



 

Phenology:—Evergreen  tree.  It  has  been  recorded  flowering  in  July, August  and  December,  and  fruiting  in 

January, July, and August. In August we observed abundant flowers on a large individual in Culebra, but no fruits were 

recorded during subsequent visits.

 

Common name:—No common name is known for this species. We propose the name “Fajardo’s big guava” 

(“guayabota de Fajardo”, in Spanish) based on the common names of similar species of Eugenia in Puerto Rico, and 

because the species was originally described from the municipality of Fajardo.

 

Additional  specimens  examined:—PUERTO  RICO.  Culebra:  Culebrita  islet,  1967,  Woodbury  s.n.  (NY! 

[#00946401], UPR! [# 028396], US! [#3532185]); Bo. Flamenco, western slopes of the peninsula between Flamenco 

and Resaca beaches. 19 m elev., 4 Aug. 2005, Caraballo et al. 480 (HUH!, K!, NY!, UPR!); slopes of the peninsula 

between  Flamenco  and  Resaca  beaches, Aug  4  2005,  Trejo  et  al.  3030  (MAPR!,  NY!,  UPR!,  US!);  Jan  7  2008, 



Caraballo & Torres 2197 (UPR!), 2198 (NY!); May 6 2009, Monsegur & Pacheco 1069 (MAPR!). Fajardo: Punta 

Cabeza Chiquita, west of Seven Seas Beach, Aug 27 2005, Carlo & Aukema 68 (UPR!); Mar 11 2006, Trejo 3061 

(UPR!); El Convento Norte, Feb 7 2008, Sustache et al. 1397 (SJ!); Aug 6 2011, Torres & Mercado 18 (MAPR!, 

UPR!, UPRRP!, NY!, US!); May 20 2013, Torres & Hogan 19 (UPRRP!); May 20 2013, Acevedo-Rodríguez et al. 



15599 (US). Vieques: Monte Pirata, southeastern slopes, Jun. 22 1966, Woodbury V-19 (MAPR!, UPR!); Jan 16 2005, 

Caraballo & Vives 370A (UPR!), 370B (MAPR!); Jun. 5 2005, Trejo et al. 2981 (UPR!).

 

Discussion:—Given that the original description of E. fajardensis was based on sterile material (leafy branches), 

the taxon was classified tentatively in the genus Eugenia. During our field expeditions we found one tree in full 

bloom (Caraballo et al. 480, Trejo et al. 3030), allowing the examination of its flowers. In addition, the herbarium 

specimen collected by Howard (16063) includes two fruits, both of them with single large seeds. The morphology these 

reproductive structures validates its identity as a Eugenia. As a matter of caution, the specimen collected by Sintenis 

(1859) includes fragments of the inflorescence of a different, albeit common congener: Eugenia biflora (Linnaeus 

1759: 1056) De Candolle (1828: 276).

 

Eugenia  fajardensis  has  been  confused  consistently  with  Myrcianthes  fragrans.  Although  the  leaves  of  M. 

fragrans are variable in shape and sometimes resemble those of E. fajardensis (Figs. 2D & 3C)the species can be 

easily distinguished even from sterile specimens. The main diagnostic characters are: (1) E. fajardensis has a vertically 

fissured rough dark-grey bark (Figs. 2B & 3D), in contrast to the smooth reddish-brown and grayish bark that peels in 

large irregular plates (guava-like) of M. fragrans; (2) the axillary leaf buds of E. fajardensis are inconspicuous with a 

loose ferrugineous puberulence, whereas they are conspicuous with an adpressed silvery pubescence in M. fragrans

(3) the flowers of E. fajardensis are born solitary or in simple short racemes (Figs. 2E & 3C), whereas those of M. 



fragrans are produced in elongate dichasia; and (4) the fruits of E. fajardensis measure up to 2.5 cm in diameter with 

short and stout peduncles (Figs. 2H & 3B), in contrast to those of M. fragrans, which are up to 1 cm in diameter on 

filiform peduncles. Eugenia fajardensis has been also confused with E. woodburyana because both species share leaf 

size, shape, and glandular dotting, as well as fruit size. However, E. woodburyana is distinctive in its ciliate leaves and 

winged fruits.

Population descriptions

In addition to the information presented in the Habitat section, we provide here information on geography, counts of 

individuals, estimated areas of occupancy, and occurrence within protected areas for each of the known populations of 

E. fajardensis (see also Figure 1 and Table 1).

 

Fajardo:—The largest known population of E. fajardensis is located in El Convento Norte and consists of 135 

plants, distributed along an area of ca. 3000 m

2

. The population is within the boundaries of the recently established 



Northeast  Ecological  Corridor  Natural  Reserve  (GELAPR  2013).  In  addition,  an  isolated  tree  has  been  recorded 

at Bahia Las Cabezas (Seven Seas Public Beach), 1.5 km southwest of El Convento Norte, within the Seven Seas 

Natural Reserve. The record from Las Croabas at the peninsula Las Cabezas de San Juan, reported by Howard in 

1965, was destroyed by building constructions; further explorations to locate additional individuals at the site were 

unsuccessful  (Howard  1977). The  historical  specimen  from  1885  was  collected  at  an  unspecified  coastal  locality 

within the municipality of Fajardo and provides no information on habitat or abundance.



EUgEnIA FAJARDEnSIS (MYRTACEAE)

Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press   

•   

161

 

Culebra:—The population of E. fajardensis at the eastern slope of the peninsula between Flamenco and Resaca 

beaches is distributed along an area of ca. 4000 m

2

. It consists of 25 individuals, of which 22 are located within the 



Culebra National Wildlife Refuge boundaries, and three of them (12%) inside private property. An isolated tree was 

found at the western slope of that peninsula. The record from the islet of Culebrita in 1967 lacks information on 

specific locality, abundance and habitat. Culebrita is within the Culebra National Wildlife Refuge.

 

Vieques:—The population of E. fajardensis at Monte Pirata is scattered along an area ca.  3000 m

2

 and consists 



of about 20 individuals. The site is within the Vieques National Wildlife Refuge.

Key to distinguish the Eugenia taxa reported for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands

Eugenia is the most species-rich genus in the West Indies with 239 recognized taxa, of which 218 (91%) are endemic 

(Acevedo-Rodríguez & Strong 2008). Myrtaceae is one of the ten most diverse families of flowering plants in the West 

Indies, with ca. 542 taxa, of which 494 (91%) are endemic (Acevedo-Rodríguez & Strong 2008). Such richness can 

pose a challenge to accurately identify taxa to species level and below, especially when the available taxonomic keys 

are outdated or incomplete, most of the specimens lack reproductive structures, many species are poorly known and/or 

have incomplete descriptions, and key characters to discern species in the field are rarely available.

 

Here we present a key to distinguish all the Eugenia reported for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. This key 



includes the taxa recognized for Puerto Rico by Axelrod (2011) and for the Virgin Islands by Acevedo-Rodríguez 

(1996). We also include notes on distributions and habitats whenever possible to assist with recognition of taxa in the 

field. Regional endemic taxa are indicated as follows: Puerto Rico (PR), and the Virgin Islands (VI).

1.  


Leaf apex obtuse, rounded or emarginate (a few acute leaves sometimes present in E. sessiliflora Vahl) . .................................... 2.

-  


Leaf apex acute, acuminate or mucronate ... .................................................................................................................................. 11.

2.  


Leaf base obtuse or cuneate . ............................................................................................................................................................ 3.

-  


Leaf base cordate .. ........................................................................................................................................................................... 9.

3.  


Mature fruits > 1 cm in diameter .. ................................................................................................................................................... 4.

-  


Mature fruits ≤ 1 cm in diameter . .................................................................................................................................................... 7.

4.  


Flowers sessile; PR and VI . .......................................................................................................................................... E. sessiliflora

-  


Flowers pedicellate . ......................................................................................................................................................................... 5.

5.  


Leaf margins ciliate; fruits distinctively winged; lowlands in southern PR . ......................................................... .. E. woodburyana

-  


Leaf margins glabrous; fruits without wings  ................................................................................................................................... 6.

6.  


Leaves 4–5 cm; margins revolute; pedicels 0.5 cm long; lowlands in eastern PR (including Culebra and Vieques islands) .. ........... 

 ....................................................................................................................................................................................... E. fajardensis

-  

Leaves 6–9 cm long; margins flat; pedicels 0.6–1 cm long; high elevation forests throughout PR . .................................................. 



 ................................................................................................................................................. E. stahlii ((Kiaerskov) Krug & Urban

7.  


Leaves broadly elliptic; margins flat .. ....................... . E. cordata (Swartz) De Candolle var. sintenisii (Kiaerskov) Krug & Urban

Leaves narrowly elliptic or obovate; margins revolute . .................................................................................................................. 8.



8.  

Leaves ≤ 3.7 cm long; petioles 0.5 cm; inflorescence cauliflorous; moist and wet forests in western PR . ........... E. padronii Alain

-  

Leaves > 3.7 cm; petioles 0.2 cm long or less; inflorescence axillary; mid and low elevations in dry forests and coastal habitats ...  



 ................................................................................................................................................................................ E. foetida Persoon

9.  


Leaves 1.8–2.5 [rarely –5] cm; pedicels absent or < 0.1 cm; fruits 0.6 cm diameter; lowlands in eastern PR and VI  ....................... 

 .................................................................................................................................... E. cordata (Swartz) De Candolle var. cordata

-  

Leaves 3.1–6.2 cm; pedicels > 0.5 cm; fruits > 1.5 cm diameter . ................................................................................................. 10.



10.  

Inflorescence axillary; pedicels 0.9–3.1 cm; fruits 1.8 cm diameter; summit of mountain forests in central and eastern PR  ............ 

 .................................................................................................................................................................... ... E. borinquensis Britton

-  


Inflorescence cauliflorous; pedicels 0.5–0.9 cm; fruits 2–3 cm diameter; deciduous and scrubby forests in VI (Saint John) .. ......... 

 ........................................................................................................................................................ . E. earhartii Acevedo-Rodriguez

11.  

Petioles ≤ 0.3 cm... ......................................................................................................................................................................... 12.



-  

Petioles > 0.3 cm... ......................................................................................................................................................................... 14.

12.  

Leaf base obtuse or cuneate; mountain forests at high elevations in central and western PR .. .................... E. stewardsonii Britton



-  

Leaf base cordate, oblique or truncate . .......................................................................................................................................... 13.

13.  

Leaf blade 1.8–2.5 [–5] cm; base cordate; petioles absent or < 0.1 cm; lowlands in eastern PR and VI ...... E. cordata var. cordata



Leaf blade 10–18 cm; base oblique, truncate or slightly cordate; petiole 0.2–0.3 cm; forests at middle and high elevations in PR .. 

...  .................................................................................................................................................................... E. haematocarpa Alain

14.  


Fruits > 1.5 cm diameter; PR  ............................................................................................................................................ ... E. stahlii

-  


Fruits ≤ 1.5 cm . .............................................................................................................................................................................. 15.

15.  


Pedicels absent (flowers sessile) or ≤ 0.2 cm long .. ...................................................................................................................... 16.

Pedicels > 0.2 cm long ................................................................................................................................................................... 19.



16.  

Leaves > 3.7 cm long ..................................................................................................................................................................... 17.

-  

Leaves ≤ 3.7 cm long .................................................................................................................................................................. ... 18.



TREJO-TORRES ET AL.

162   

• 

  Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press

17.  


Leaves elliptic or obovate; fruits rounded, ripening red .. ............................................................................ E. cordata var. sintenisii

-  


Leaves elliptic-ovate; fruits oblong, ripening black .. ................................................................... E. glabrata (Swartz) De Candolle

18.  


Leaves oblancelolate; leaf blade strongly revolute .. ......................................................................................................... . E. foetida

-  


Leaves ovate to narrowly ovate; leaf blade flat or revolute only at the base .. ......................... . E. monticola (Swartz) De Candolle

19. 


Inflorescences fasciculate, or with few flowers (≤ 5), or flowers solitary . ................................................................................... 20.

Inflorescences of numerous flowers (>5) in racemes or panicles . ................................................................................................ 26.



20.  

Inflorescences fasciculate ... ........................................................................................................................................................... 21.

Inflorescences of few flowers (≤ 5), or flowers solitary ... ............................................................................................................ 23.



21. 

Leaf blade strongly coriaceous and stiff; apex bent downward; petioles > 0.5 cm long .............................. E. confusa De Candolle

-  

Leaf blade slightly coriaceous; apex not bent; petiole ≤ 0.5 cm long  ........................................................................................... 22.



22.  

Fruits 0.6 cm in diameter . ...................................................................................................................... .. E. procera (Swartz) Poiret

-  

Fruits 0.9–1.5 cm in diameter ... ..............................................................................................  E. rhombea (O. Berg) Krug & Urban



23.  

Twigs with lancelolate or linear bracts .. ...................................................................................... . E. ligustrina (Swartz) Willdenow

-  

Twigs without lancelolate or linear bracts .. ................................................................................................................................... 24.



24.  

Petiole > 0.6 cm; inflorescence cauliflorous .. ....................................................................................................... . E. laevis O. Berg

-  

Petiole ≤ 0.6 cm; inflorescence axillary or terminal . ..................................................................................................................... 25.



25.  

Twigs pubescent; petioles often reddish or purple . ......................................................................... E. axillaris (Swartz) Willdenow

-  

Twigs glabrous; petioles green . ................................................................................................................ E. pseudopsidium Jacquin



26.  

Leaves > 6 cm long ........................................................................................................................................................................ 27.

-  

Leaves ≤ 6 cm long . .......................................................................................................................................................... .. E. biflora



27.  

Fruits smooth ... ............................................................................................................................................. E. domingensis O. Berg

-  

Fruits verrucose; PR .. ...................................................................................................................................... E. eggersii Kiaerskov



Acknowledgments

We thank: C. Clubbe, A. Lugo, N. Snow, and an anonymous reviewer for providing comments and suggestions to 

improve  the  manuscript;  J. Aukema,  M.  Barandiaran,  G.  Burgos,  R.  Colón,  O.  Díaz,  J.  García, W.  Hernández,  J. 

Martínez, M. Mercado, A. Morales, P.J. Rivera, R. Rivera, A. Román, E. Santiago, T. Talevast, the Herbarium UPR, and 

the USFWS for providing valuable logistic support during field expeditions; the curators of B, BM, C, F, FTG, GOET, 

HUH, JBSD, K, L, MAPR, NY, P, SJ, UPR, UPRRP, US, WAG, and W for facilitating the access to collections; J. 

Vélez (MAPR) and F. Areces (UPRRP) for preparing digital images of selected specimens; M. Quiñones for providing 

assistance on GIS and climate data; O. Díaz, O. Monsegur, C. Pacheco and J. Sustache for providing information on 

localities and abundance data; and G. Alvarado and J. Pérez from El nuevo Día newspaper, and the Sierra Club Puerto 

Rico Chapter for divulging on E. fajardensis to the general public. JCTT thanks  the USDA Forest Service International 

the Institute of Tropical Forestry for supporting initial research under cooperative agreement 00-CA-1112-0105-001 

with Ciudadanos del Karso, Inc.



References

Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. (1996) Flora of St. John, US Virgin Islands. Memoirs of the new York Botanical garden 78: 1–581.

Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. & Strong, M.T. (2007) Catalogue of the seed plants of the West Indies Website. National Museum of Natural 

History, The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Available from: http://persoon.si.edu/antilles/westindies/index.htm. (accessed 

August 21, 2014).

Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. & Strong, M.T. (2008) Floristic richness and affinities in the West Indies. The Botanical Review 74: 5–36.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12229-008-9000-1



Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. & Strong, M.T. (2012) Catalogue of seed plants of the West

 Indies. Smithsonian Contributions to Botany 98: 

1



1192.



 

http://dx.doi.org/10.5479/si.0081024x.98.1

Axelrod, F.S. (2011) A systematic vademecum to the vascular plants of Puerto Rico. Botanical Research Institute of Texas Press 34, Fort 

Worth, Texas, 428 pp.

Ayensu, E.S. & DeFilipps. R.A. (1978) 

Endangered, threatened, and recently extinct species of Puerto Rico and the 

Virgin 

Islands. I



n: 

Endangered and threatened plants of the United States. Smithsonian Institution and World Wildlife Fund – U.S., Washington D.C., 

pp. 225–232.

Berg,  O.C.  (1855–1856)  Revisio  Myrtacearum  Americae  hucusque  cognitarum  seu  Johann  Friedrich  Klotzschii,  “flora  Americae 

aequinoctialis” exhibens Myrtaceas, auct. Linnaea 27: 1–472.



EUgEnIA FAJARDEnSIS (MYRTACEAE)

Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press   

•   

163

Breckon, G. (in prep.) Report on the flora of Vieques Island, Puerto Rico. Herbarium MAPR, University of Puerto Rico – Mayagüez 

Campus, Mayagüez.

Britton, N.L. & Wilson, P. (1925) Botany of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands: descriptive flora – spermatophyta. In: Scientific survey of 



Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Volume 6, parts 1 & 2. New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 1–316.

Britton, N.L. & Wilson, P. (1926) Botany of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands: descriptive flora – spermatophyta, with appendix. In: 



Scientific survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Volume 6, part 3. New York Academy of Sciences, New York. pp. 317–521.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.10217



Castro-Canabal, E.M. & López-Morales, K.N. (2010) Recursos de educación ambiental para el Corredor Ecológico del noreste. M.A. 

Thesis, School of Environmental Affairs, Metropolitan University, San Juan. 218 pp.

Center for Plant Conservation (1992) Report on the r

are plants of Puerto Rico. Center for Plant Conservation, Missouri Botanical Garden, 

St. Louis, Missouri, 81 pp.

Center for Plant Conservation (2010) Calyptranthes thomasiana, CPC national collections plant profile. Missouri Botanical Garden, St. 

Louis, Missouri. Available from: http://www.centerforplantconservation.org. (accessed August 21, 2014).

Clubbe, C., Pollard, B., Smith-Abbott, J., Walker, R. & Woodfield, N. (2003) Calyptranthes thomasianaIn: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List 

of Threatened Species. Version 2013.1. Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org (accessed 21 August 2014).

Daly, C., Helmer, E.H., & Quiñones, M. (2003) Mapping the climate of Puerto Rico, Vieques and Culebra. International Journal of 

Climatology 23: 1359–1381.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/joc.937



De Candolle, A.P. (1828) Prodromus systematis naturalis regni vegetabilis. Volume 3. Treuttel and Würtz, Paris. 494 pp.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.286



DNER (2004) Reglamento para regir las especies vulnerables y en peligro de extinción en el Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico

Department of Natural and Environmental Resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, San Juan, 60 pp.

DNER (2008) Elementos críticos de la División de Patrimonio natural – plantas. Division of Natural Heritage, Department of Natural 

and Environmental Resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, San Juan, 12 pp.

DNER (2010) Documento de designación de la gran Reserva natural del Corredor Ecológico del noreste. Department of Natural and 

Environmental Resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, San Juan, 128 pp.

GELAPR (2013) Ley núm. 8 del 13 de abril de 2013 para enmendar la ley núm. 126 del 2012, ley de la Reserva natural del Corredor 

Ecológico del noreste.

 

Gobierno del Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico, San Juan.



Gould, W.A., Jiménez, M.E., Potts, G.S., Quiñones, M. & Martinuzzi, S. (2008) Landscape units of Puerto Rico: influence of climate, 

substrate, and topography (map). Scale 1: 260 000. IITF-RMAP-06. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, International 

Institute of Tropical Forestry, Río Piedras.

Grisebach, A.H.R. (1860) Flora of the British West Indian Islands. Lovell, Reeve & Co. London, 789 pp.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.56664



Howard, R.A. (1977) Conservation and the endangered species of plants in the Caribbean islands. In: Prance, G.T. & Elias, T.S. (Eds.) 

Extinction is forever: threatened and endangered species of plants in the Americas and their significance in ecosystems today and in 

the future. Proceedings of a symposium in commemoration of the Bicentennial of the United States of America, New York Botanical 

Garden, New York, pp. 105–114.

IUCN (2001) IUCN red list categories and criteria. Version 3.1. IUCN, Species Survival Commission, Gland, Switzerland. Available from: 

http://www.iucnredlist.org/info/categories_criteria2001.html.

Linnaeus, C. (1753) Species plantarum. Tomus I. L. Salvius, Stockholm, 560 pp.

Linnaeus, C. (1759) Systema naturae. ed. 10. vol. 2., pp. 825–1384.

Liogier, H.A. (1980) Novitates Antillanae VIII. Phytologia 47: 167–198.

Liogier, H.A. (1994) Descriptive flora of Puerto Rico and adjacent islands. Spermatophyta, Vol. 3. Editorial de la Universidad de Puerto 

Rico, Río Piedras, 462 pp.

Liogier, H.A. & Martorell, L.F. (1982) Flora of Puerto Rico and adjacent islands: a systematic synopsis. Editorial de la Universidad de 

Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, 342 pp.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fedr.4910980917



Little, E.L., Jr. & Woodbury, R.O. (1980) Rare and endemic trees of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Conservation Research Report 

No. 27. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, D.C. 26 pp.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.65042



Little, E.L. Jr., Woodbury, R.O. & Wadsworth, F.H. (1974) Trees of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Vol. 2. Agriculture Handbook 449, 

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, D.C., 1024 pp.

Little, E.L. Jr., Woodbury, R.O. & Wadsworth, F.H. (1988) Árboles de Puerto Rico y las Islas Vírgenes. Vol. 2. Agriculture Handbook 449-

S, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, D.C., 1177 pp.



TREJO-TORRES ET AL.

164   

• 

  Phytotaxa 191 (1) © 2014 Magnolia Press

McVaugh, R. (1963) Tropical American Myrtaceae, II. Notes of generic concepts and description of previously unrecognized species. 



Fieldiana 29: 395–532.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.3851



Silander, S. (1997) Calyptranthes thomasiana recovery plan. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta, Georgia, 17 pp.

Swartz, O. (1788) nova genera et species plantarum seu prodromus descriptionum vegetabilium. Stockholm-Uppsala, 158 pp.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.4400



Thiers, B. (2014) Index Herbariorum: A global directory of public herbaria and associated staff. New York Botanical Garden’s Virtual 

Herbarium. Available from: http://sweetgum.nybg.org/ih/ (accessed 11September 2014).

Urban, I. (1895) Additamenta ad cognitionem florae Indiae Occidentalis. Particula II: Myrtaceae. Botanische Jahrbücher für Systematik, 

Pflanzengeschichte und Pflanzengeographie 19: 577–681.

Urban, I. (1923) Plantae cubenses novae vel rariores a clo. Er. L. Ekman lectae. I. Symbolae Antillanae seu Fundamenta Florae Indiae 



Occidentalis 9: 55–176.

USFWS (1994) Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants: determination of endangered status for Myrcia paganii and Calyptranthes 



thomasiana, Final rule. Federal Register 59: 8138–3142.

USFWS (2007) Vieques national Wildlife Refuge comprehensive conservation plan and environmental impact statement. U.S. Department 

of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Southeast Region, Atlanta, Georgia, 353 pp.

USFWS (2013) Thomas’ Lindflower (Calyptranthes thomasiana) 5-year review: summary and evaluation. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 

Southeast Region, Caribbean Ecological Service Field Office, Boquerón, Puerto Rico, 22 pp.

Willdenow, C.L. (1799) Linnaeus, species plantarum. Tomus II, Part II. Editio Quarta. Impensis G.C. Nauk, Berlin. 1340 pp.

Woodbury, R.O. (1975) Rare and endangered plants of Puerto Rico: A committee report. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation 

Service and the Department of Natural Resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, San Juan, 85 pp.

Woodbury, R.O. (1981) The flora of Culebra. Unpublished report submitted to the Department of Natural Resources of the Commonwealth 

of Puerto Rico, San Juan, 27 pp.



Каталог: research
research -> Oncology handbook
research -> Qonaqpяrvяrlik tяdqiqatlarы Beynяlxalq jurnal
research -> 2017 university of queensland development fellowships c1 research-industry capacity area plan
research -> Learn About Your Health
research -> Research your Way to Good Health with the Internet What Kind of Health Information is on the Internet?
research -> A genome-wide crispr screen in Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes
research -> Revised january 30, 2009 a tangled web
research -> 6000 – 7000 species Ectothermic Pulmonary respiration
research -> The Misdiagnosis Of Bipolar Disorder As Major Depression In The Primary Care Setting Nasa Valentine, md
research -> Solid Pollen Germination Medium (pgm): (Zhengbio Yang laboratory, University of California, Riverside)


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə